Mark Zuckerberg is a Rich Guy who will pay $1 Billion in Taxes

Posted by PITHOCRATES - March 31st, 2013

Week in Review

It’s open season on rich people.  The favorite target of the Left.  And governments everywhere that are spending far more money than they have.  To buy votes.  So to make up that shortfall they continuously attack the rich.  For how can the rich complain with all that money?  So they attack them.  To get them to pay their ‘fair’ share of taxes.  Despite the huge tax bills they pay (see Report: Zuckerberg facing $1billion tax bill by Brett Molina posted 3/29/2013 on USA Today).

So how much will Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg have to pay in taxes for taking his social network public..?

Citing three certified public accountants based in California, CNN says Zuckerberg’s final tally, after deducting charitable donations, sits at $1 billion.

The median U.S. income is $52,762.  Based on the 2012 tax rates a single person earning the median income will pay approximately $17,442 in federal income taxes.  Which means one rich person, Mark Zuckerberg, will pay the same amount of taxes 57,333 Americans will pay.  And if a rich guy is paying what 57,333 Americans are paying it’s pretty hard to say they aren’t paying their fair share.

Zuckerberg paid these taxes while the economy was limping along in one of the worst recoveries in history.  So it would seem we should be encouraging people to get filthy rich.  For they will be able to pay huge sums in income taxes.  No matter how low the tax rate is they pay.  Even in one of the worst economic recoveries in history.

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Singapore going ‘Solyndra’ to find the next Mark Zuckerberg?

Posted by PITHOCRATES - January 26th, 2013

Week in Review

While public education teaches kids the fear of global warming, the evils of capitalism and the goodness of government Singapore is having their schools teach business and entrepreneurial skills.  The U.S. is suffering through the worst economic recovery since the Great Depression.  While Singapore is doing quite well.  And should continue to do well because they don’t teach kids the evils of capitalism in school (see Singapore Hunts for New Zuckerberg With Stanford-Style Dorm by Sharon Chen posted 1/25/13 on Bloomberg).

Singapore became Southeast Asia’s only advanced economy by moving up the technology ladder, turning a trading port into the region’s biggest banking center and a manufacturer of electronics, petrochemicals and pharmaceuticals. Now, the nation is looking to gain a bigger share of a software industry that raised $28 billion in initial share sales last year.

N-House, which opened in August 2011, is one strand of a five-year plan by the government that includes offering new technology companies grants of as much as S$500,000, supporting venture capital funds, and encouraging high schools to teach business and entrepreneurial skills, in an effort to groom the next Mark Zuckerberg, co-founder of Facebook Inc…

The island of 5 million people, ranked the easiest place to do business for seven straight years by the World Bank, is the second-easiest place in Asia after Hong Kong for entrepreneurs to gain access to capital, according to a study by the Milken Institute published in 2010.

Singapore is a success story because it’s an easy place to do business in.  Businesses like that.  So businesses do business in Singapore.  This is a lesson the United States could learn.  Making it easy for businesses to do business.  Detroit, the Motor City, birthplace of the automated assembly line, is a horrible place to do business.  Being the home of the Big Three (General Motors, Ford and Chrysler) you’d think they’d have an edge on manufacturing automobiles.  Yet not one new auto manufacturer has chosen Detroit.  Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Mercedes, BMW, Volkswagen, Hyundai, and Kia all built assembly plants in the United States.  But not one of them picked Detroit.  Because Detroit, the Motor City, is not an easy city to make automobiles in.

So Singapore knows a thing or two about how to do business.  Which, for the most part, is just leaving business the hell alone.  For a business is a lot like a dog having puppies.  They can do it without any help.  In fact, trying to help can actually do more harm to a business than good.  For when the government steps in and provides money the private sector won’t supply you can pretty much guarantee that the government is backing a bad investment.  Think Solyndra in the U.S.  And all those jobs of the future we were supposed to get with all those investments into green energy.  President Obama begins his second term with the worst recovery since the Great Depression.  Despite all that spending to invest into the jobs of the future.  Here’s a lesson Singapore can learn from the U.S.  Creating a business-friendly environment is good.  But trying to influence things in that environment, well, that rarely ends well.  Again, think Solyndra.

“Singapore has done the best job of any government to spawn an entrepreneurial ecosystem,” said Ressi, who travels to the city about three times a year to meet with government officials. “However, I think they’ve gone a little bit too far in making it easy. If they can’t actually raise money from people privately, they probably aren’t worthy of being in existence.”

There are venture capitalists out there with money burning holes in their pocket.  They want to invest it.  They want to groom the next Mark Zuckerberg.  And if these greedy bastards are NOT willing to bet their money on someone there’s a reason for it.  These people are in the business of finding entrepreneurs to back and groom.  And if they don’t invest in an entrepreneur they must have determined that the entrepreneur just doesn’t have what it takes.  So they keep looking for one who does have what it takes.  And if that person is out there the free market will find that entrepreneur.  While governments pour millions into other Solyndras.

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