The Left’s War on Women brought about the Vicious Cycle of Thong Use and Bacterial Vaginosis

Posted by PITHOCRATES - October 20th, 2013

Week in Review

The left say the Republicans have a war on women.  Because they want to restrict abortion.  Make women pay for their own birth control.  And other heinous anti-women behavior.  Such as encouraging them to marry instead of having casual sex with multiple partners.  The left says Republicans want to turn women into the housewives of the Fifties.   Having sex only with one man and getting pregnant when they do.  Instead of a woman exploring her sexuality.  And enjoying it.  That’s how uptight Republicans are.

Of course, the left’s idea of a liberated woman probably pleases men more than women.  Once upon a time men married one woman and either stayed with her or had ‘discrete’ affairs on the side.  Then the Sexual Revolution came along and women were just giving it away.  Short shorts.  Miniskirts.  Going braless.  Men just loved the women’s movement.  As women no longer wore shape-hiding dresses but revealing clothing showing all of their curves.  Then the ladies took it up a notch.  Bare midriffs.  Low rise jeans.  And thongs.  Allowing women to wear tight clinging dresses without showing any visible panty lines.  Or showing some thong riding out the back of their low-rise jeans for the men to see just to be super sexy.

Of course when we ask why women want to wear tight and clinging dresses or low-rise jeans there is but one answer.  They want men to look at them.  To see them as a sexual object.  It has to be.  For they sure aren’t doing it for the comfort.  Or the hygiene (see Why Your Thong May Be Bad For Your Health by Ellie Krupnick & Rebecca Adams posted 10/15/2013 on The Huffington Post).

Many thongs, particularly the sexy lacy kinds, are made of non-breathable materials, as opposed to cotton.  “We should all always be wearing all cotton underwear,” Dr. Ghofrany advises…”When patients say [to me], ‘But the crotch is cotton,’ my response is that the layer outside the crotch is not, thus making the cotton less breathable and thus allowing more moisture to be trapped and more possible imbalance leading to infections.”

Plus, even if the entire garment is cotton, the skinny shape creates an inherent risk. “The patient’s vulva is much more ‘exposed’ to whatever they’re wearing,” Dr. Ghofrany explains, “and given the increase in leggings and ‘skinny’ jeans, all of which have Lycra, Spandex, etc., there again is trapped moisture.”

Lastly, the thin band of material at the crotch tends to move around, possibly transferring bacteria from one spot to another. As Dr. Rabin tells, us, “If you have a little bacteria — E. coli is the most common bacteria in the colon — in the back part of the fabric and you’re physically active, that material may move. All it has to do is move an inch or two and it’s next to the vagina or urethra. That thong may be depositing colonic bacteria into your vagina or urethra.”  Yikes.

Infections can occur when the balance of the vaginal environment, including the moisture levels from vaginal secretions, is thrown off, says Dr. Ghofrany. The most common? Yeast infections and bacterial infections, mainly bacterial vaginosis. The extra bacteria usually manifests with increased discharge, which leads to what Dr. Ghofrany calls the “vicious cycle of thong use”: the increase in discharge leads to an increased use of panty liners, which leads to even more trapped moisture, which leads to more infections and more discharge.

Thongs also carry the risk of external irritation. “I see more patients with skin tags on their vulva and near their rectum, in the exact distribution of the thongs,” Dr. Ghofrany tells us. “I sometimes will be mid-pap and ask a patient, ‘So you wear thongs a lot?’ And their response is always ‘Ya! How can you tell?’ And it’s because of the skin tags, small ‘piles’ of soft tissue that occur from the skin being constantly rubbed in the same spot. These happen traditionally at bra lines and neck lines, and now increasingly at thong lines!”

Infections?  Bacteria?  E. coli?  Bacterial vaginosis?  Vicious cycle of thong use?  Skin tags?  Piles?  That’s a pretty steep price to pay to be sexy for men.  But in our highly sexualized world where the left has sexualized women this is how women feel good.  By being sexy.  To, of course, please men.  Yet it is the right that has a war on women.  Go figure.

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LESSONS LEARNED #42: “Romantics often don’t have a clue about what they romanticize about.” -Old Pithy

Posted by PITHOCRATES - December 2nd, 2010

From Underwear to Fashion Thong

Nowadays, underwear is more of a fashion statement.  A thong rising out of a lady’s low-rise jeans with a tramp stamp above says, hey, I like to be sexy.  It doesn’t say go ahead and enjoy that bran muffin.  Unless you carry wet wipes in your purse.

Disgusting things happen under our clothes.  Being mammals, we poop and pee.  Sweat.  And get dirty.  Most of us shower daily.  And use deodorant.  We didn’t always.  But we always pooped, peed, sweated and got dirty.  And probably always will.

As we entered more modern times, we started to wear nicer clothes.  Clothes that weren’t so easy to wash.  And were expensive.  We weren’t bathing all that often yet.  So we came up with an idea of how to keep all our bodily filth off of our spiffy new clothes.  Underwear.

Gallant Knights no Doubt had Skid Marks in their Armor

People are fascinated with medieval court life.  Dashing princes.  Gallant knights.  Fair maidens.  Chivalry.  The stuff of fairy tales.  Every little girl dreams of having Prince Charming sweep her up onto his steed and gallop off into the sunset.  If you brought these people into our modern world, though, you wouldn’t want to be anywhere near them.  Their stench would make you want to vomit.

Modern people would not believe how bad this stink was.  Of course, back then, when everyone stunk, it didn’t smell so bad.  Stink is, after all, relative.  Someone would have to stink a lot worse than you for you even to notice their stink.  But filth is absolute.  So we started to wear underwear to keep the skid marks off of our fancier outer clothes.

Even the dashing ladies and gentlemen of 19th century America were still pretty smelly.  They didn’t bathe every day.  And they didn’t wash their outer clothing all that often.  But they tried to do like mother said.  And wear clean underwear.

Clean Underwear is as Good as a Shower in the 19th Century

One of the finest military memoirs ever written were those of General Ulysses S. Grant.  He would advance to command all Union forces during the American Civil War.  One time, his army was advancing so quickly that his baggage trains couldn’t keep up.  And with no baggage, he had no clean underwear to change into.  For many, many days.

Back then you wore clean underwear when soiled.  Today, you shower.  And if you don’t have clean underwear, you still shower.  Some may turn dirty underwear inside out to wear.  Some may go commando (not wear any underwear).  But we wash to keep our outer clothes clean.  We don’t depend on underwear alone to do that job.

Because of that, our underwear got smaller.  Instead of covering our entire bodies, most wear it to just cover our naughty bits.  Or enhance our naughty bits.  Like a piece of ‘floss’ running up a lady’s butt crack.  And some even go without.  We have come a long way.  With underwear.

Drinking the Water you Poop in will Give you Cholera

With going poopies, too.  Before modern toilets, we pooped into a bowl.  If we were in an upstairs room, we would just dump it out of a window.  If we were wealthy, our servants would empty our chamber pots for us in the morning.  They’d fill a large tub full of our waste and then trudge it down to the river.  In early New York City, the Hudson River received many a tub of poop throughout any given day.

Convenient, yes, but we also did something else with rivers.  We drew our drinking water from them.  And the interesting thing about our poop?  It’s not potable.  You drink it and you get sick.  It took us a while to figure this out, though.  And during a cholera outbreak in London, we did.  Well, John Snow did.  With an able assist from the Reverend Henry Whitehead. 

The Broad Street well drew drinking water from an area of the Thames River with a high concentration of human waste.  In those days, people had cesspits under their houses.  They collected their poop in them where it would eventually dissolve into the ground.  And into the ground water.  To keep them from overflowing, they’d sometimes transport some of the waste to, you guessed it, the Thames River.   Ergo the cholera.

Smell that Smell

You ever work in a sanitary lift station?  Smell that fragrant odor as it wafts up to you from an open manhole?  If you have you know what I’m talking about.  And how it buckled your knees the first time you smelled that smell.

We take a lot for granted these days.  Like smells.  And the lack of them.  Because once upon a time, we didn’t have sewers.  We had cesspools.  And open gutters for our waste to flow in.  Down to a river.  Now that’s a special odor.  And few today can really appreciate it.  Unless they’ve worked up close and personal in one of our waste water treatment systems.

A little more than a hundred years ago, that odor permeated some of our bigger cities.  And it was everywhere.  Where our kids played.  Where we cooked our meals.  Where we ate them.  It was with us when we slept.  It came out of our pores.  It was horrible beyond belief.  This stink.  Made by the gentry of high society.  Those beautiful people we romanticize about.  Like Scarlet O’Hara.  Dashing princes.  And fair maidens.  Of course, there was an upside to this foul stench.  It concealed our vile body odor.

Screw the Past

There’s a lot to being human that is disgusting.  And the farther back you go, the more disgusting we were.  The fact that a woman can wear a thong or go without underwear these days says a lot about how far our hygiene has advanced.  We can wear less and we’ve never been cleaner.  Or smelled better.  You can romanticize all you want about those quaint, charming days before the 20th century, but you can’t beat the here and now. 

We’re clean.  We don’t stink.  Our cities are clean.  And they don’t stink.  We have flush toilets.  And safe drinking water.  And if you want to find a cholera outbreak these days, you have to go to a third world country.  Call me new-fashioned, but give me the here and now and “screw the past” (to borrow a line from Perfume by Sparks).

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