Canadian Public Sector Workers average 18.2 Paid Sick Days a Year

Posted by PITHOCRATES - June 15th, 2013

Week in Review

Nations around the world are suffering financial crises due to the costs of their public sectors.  Which they pay for by taxing the private sector.  Even though people in the private sector don’t enjoy anywhere near the generous benefits the public sector enjoys (see Government to target public service’s sick days in next round of bargaining by BILL CURRY posted 6/10/2013 on The Globe and Mail).

The Conservative government is putting public-service unions on notice that sick days will be targeted in the next round of collective bargaining.

Treasury Board president Tony Clement said the government wants to move away from the current rules, where workers can use up to 15 paid sick days and five family days a year, in addition to vacation time.

The Minister stopped short of accusing public servants of abusing the system, but questioned why the federal absentee rate is higher than that of other governments and the private sector, where he said the average number of sick days is 6.7.

“Look, I think that the great majority of public servants are, when they take time off, they are sick. But there’s no question that the rate of sick leave, when you’re looking at 18.2 days as an average in a year, is well beyond not only private sector norms but other public-sector norms,” Mr. Clement said Monday at a news conference on Parliament Hill…

Union leaders also took issue with comparisons of public- and private-sector absenteeism, arguing the private sector does not document sick days in the same way as governments do…

“Mental illness, stress, anxiety, depression were not admitted to or acknowledged,” he said. “Cancer was much less treatable than it is today. So the workplace has changed dramatically in the past 40 years, but the disability management system has not. Employees are getting lost or forgotten in the system.”

Yes, we admit and acknowledge those illnesses more today than we used to.  And we do treat cancer more than we once did.  However, these illnesses do not affect the public sector differently than they affect the private sector.  So if the private sector is averaging 8.7 sick days there is no reason why the public sector should be averaging 18.2 sick days.  On top of 5 family days.  Holidays.  And vacation time.

One of the arguments for a single-payer health care system in the United States is that people will be healthier.  With access to health care doctors will catch disease early and stop it in its tracks.  Now either the Canadians are milking the system or a single-payer health care system doesn’t make people healthier.

If the organization a person works for can get by for a month (after you add together all that paid time off) without that person being there chances are that they can get by the other 11 months of the year without that person being there.  Which is why you don’t see 18.2 sick says in the private sector.  Because it’s too great a cost burden to pay people for not working.  As private sector employers can’t just raise their prices to cover this cost.  Whereas the government can raise taxes.  Or print money.

But there even is a limit for government, too.  As we can see by the Eurozone sovereign debt crisis.  And the need to cut back on generous sick pay in Canada.  Higher taxes reduce economic activity.  Which reduces government revenues.  Which they make up with borrowing.  Until they suffer a sovereign debt crisis.  Like in the Eurozone.  Where a country is so deep in debt that no one wants to loan them anymore.  For it is unlikely that a nation so deep in debt will ever repay that debt.  Which is why these generous public sector benefits are simply not sustainable.  When you can no longer tax or borrow you have but one option left.  You have to cut costs.  And the public sector will have to live more like the private sector.  Less exalted and privileged.  As public servants should.

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