Spain is Taking Center Stage in the Eurozone Crisis

Posted by PITHOCRATES - May 5th, 2012

Week in Review

To be a generous welfare state requires one of two things.  Either a population making babies like bunnies.  To keep the base of the pyramid of the welfare state expanding greater than the top.  Or a booming economy that showers money onto the treasury.  If you have neither than you better have good credit (see Spanish borrowing costs to jump at auction, bank buying eyed by Paul Day posted 5/3/2012 on Reuters).

Spain has jumped to the forefront of the euro zone debt crisis due to concern over its public deficit and shrinking economy and pressure is growing for a plan to recapitalize its banks, which are burdened with bad debts from a property market crash…

Spanish banks, virtually cut out of wholesale debt markets after losing billions since a decade-long property bubble burst in 2008, snapped up cash the European Central Bank pumped into the euro zone banking system in December and February, in operations totaling more than a trillion euros.

Recent data from the Bank of Spain suggests that they used a portion of the ECB’s ultra-cheap three-year money to buy up high-yielding sovereign debt.

According to the central bank, Spanish lenders held just over 13 percent of domestic debt in November 2011, but that total soared to almost 30 percent by March. Non-residents held almost 56 percent of all Spanish debt in November, but by March, that proportion had fallen to 38.8 percent.

Spain has neither a population boom nor an economic boom.  Nor is her credit looking all that good.  Which does not bode well for the Eurozone. 

Too many countries look to the housing market as the panacea for all that ills an economy.  Keep money cheap to borrow.  To encourage people to borrow.  So they can borrow.  And buy overvalued houses.  This is the kind of government Keynesian tinkering that never ends well.  And there are so many examples in history you’d think we’d have learned this lesson by now.  Japan, Ireland, Spain and the United States.  And now even China is growing a little housing bubble of their own.  Bubbles are not good.  They are artificial economic growth.  And they always pop.  Just ask our good friends in Japan, Ireland, Spain and the United States.

And when those bubbles pop recessions set in.  To correct all of those overvalued prices.  There’s deflation.  Old debt that becomes impossible to repay.  So banks fail.  Just because government Keynesians had to tinker.  Playing with interest rates.  To keep them below what the market would have them.  It was good on the upside.  Great new government spending and benefits.  Which have to go away on the downside.  Because there isn’t the robust economic activity to pay for it.  Even the interest on the debt becomes difficult to pay.  And because all of this is in play no one wants to buy their sovereign debt anymore.  Which raises the interest they must pay on new debt to retire old debt.  And the vicious cycle just continues.

Trying to fix the debt problem is looking at a system and not the disease.  The disease is the welfare state.  And until they cut that spending the debt problem will never go away.

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