Flood Insurance Premiums rise following Katrina and Sandy beyond what Some can Afford

Posted by PITHOCRATES - June 9th, 2013

Week in Review

Few things are as enjoyable as a beachfront view.  What a way to live.  Seeing the sunrise over the ocean.  Breathing that sea air.  Walking out your door to the water’s edge.  How lucky those lucky few are who live on the ocean’s edge.  Of course, there are some drawbacks to living on the ocean’s edge (see After Sandy, a new threat: Soaring flood insurance by Katie Zezima and Meghan Barr, Associated Press, posted 6/10/2013 on Yahoo! News).

George Kasimos has almost finished repairing flood damage to his waterfront home, but his Superstorm Sandy nightmare is far from over.

Like thousands of others in the hardest-hit coastal stretches of New Jersey and New York, his life is in limbo as he waits to see if tough new coastal rebuilding rules make it just too expensive for him to stay.

That’s because the federal government’s newly released advisory flood maps have put his Toms River home in the most vulnerable area — the “velocity zone.” If that sticks, he’d have to jack his house up 14 feet on stilts at a cost of $150,000 or face up to $30,000 a year in flood insurance premiums…

Officials are urging people to elevate their houses now because they are eligible for federal financial aid. About $350 million of New York City’s and $600 million of New Jersey’s Sandy relief funding has been allocated for the repair of single- and two-family homes, which could help defray the cost…

Several months before Sandy hit, Congress quietly passed the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act, a bill that authorized skyrocketing premium increases for people in flood-prone communities.

It was a desperate attempt to keep the program financially solvent after it was nearly bankrupted by an onslaught of claims from Hurricane Katrina, which forced the federal government to borrow about $17 billion from the Treasury.

Borrowing $17 billion from the Treasury?  That means borrowing $17 billion from the taxpayers.  And that’s the sad truth.  The people who don’t enjoy living on the ocean’s edge are the ones who end up paying for storm damage suffered by those living on the ocean’s edge.  People who shouldn’t be subsidizing someone’s dangerous home location.  Unless these people throw open their doors for all of us to come over and spend a few weeks on the beach with them.

Living on the ocean’s edge is both beautiful and dangerous.  Those who enjoy the beauty should pay for the privilege of enjoying that beauty.  Yes, it’s sad these people lost so much from Sandy.  But it was their choice to live there.  And they should pay all the costs required to live there.  Including all their insurance costs.  Like every other home owner must do that doesn’t have that gorgeous ocean view.

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Global Warming Fears wane as People buy Cars with Powerful Internal Combustion Engines

Posted by PITHOCRATES - November 25th, 2012

Week in Review

After the devastation of Hurricane/Super Storm Sandy those on the Left are asking with smug arrogance if we’re ready to address the issue of global warming seriously now.  Just as they did after Hurricane Katrina.  About 7 years earlier.  With relatively calm hurricane seasons between Katrina and Sandy.  Which wasn’t supposed to happen according to those on the left.  For they said there would be an increase in the number of Katrina-like events happening each hurricane season following the year of Hurricane Katrina.  Because of man-made global warming.  What they call a scientific fact.  Even though the facts appear to say otherwise.

So the majority of people ignore their warnings.  As they tired of these people crying wolf.  Proven by the type of cars we’re buying.  And the type of cars we want to buy (see 12 More New Cars Worth Waiting For by Michael Frank posted 11/25/2012 on Popular Mechanics).

Go back a few years and every new car shouted about mpg and economizing. This year, fuel efficiency is still important, but style is back for the new cars sporting 2013 and 2014 model years.

What do these new cars have in common?  An internal combustion engine.  That’s right, not a one of them is a hybrid or an electric car.

When the government bailed out General Motors and took an ownership position they pushed the Chevy Volt.  A hybrid that was going to help save the world from global warming.  There was only one problem.  Few people wanted to buy a Chevy Volt.  As people don’t want to pay more and get less in a car.

Based on the type of cars we’re buying it’s fair to say the masses aren’t wringing their hands over the warming they’re causing.  Because they don’t believe they are causing it.  For after being told that if we don’t do something right now it will be too late prevent the destructive damage of global warming for the last 20 years people start doubting them.  Besides, glaciers once covered the world.  They don’t now.  And it sure wasn’t man-made global warming that melted them away.

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Superstorm Sandy Recovery Slower in Less Affluent Areas where People Feel Abandoned

Posted by PITHOCRATES - November 4th, 2012

Week in Review

After George W. Bush used his special secret powers to steer Hurricane Katrina into New Orleans and then blew up the levees protecting the city because he hated poor minorities (that’s what some on the Left believe), the media attacked him for the federal response.  Nothing was done fast enough.  Or good enough.  And the reason was because George W. Bush hasted poor minorities.  But many have placed a lot of blame on the mayor and governor.  For not following New Orleans’ evacuation plan.  Especially the mayor for waiting so long to give the evacuation order.  Probably few will ever be satisfied with placing the blame for the aftermath of Katrina.  For they could have done a lot of things better.

Katrina is past history.  A tragedy.  But a learning opportunity.  After that experience all levels of government should be able to operate as a finely oiled machine to bring quick relief to anyone suffering a Katrina-like event.  And now we’ve had one.  Hurricane Sandy (or Superstorm Sandy).  So how is the Sandy aftermath going?  Well, if you read some reports, you’d think you were reading about Katrina again (see ‘This is our Katrina’: Misery for 2.5 million STILL without power after six days as lawlessness and fear take over New York’s outer boroughs by Rachel Rickard Straus and Snejana Farberov posted 11/3/2012 on the Daily Mail).

Almost one week after superstorm Sandy struck the East Coast with its ferocious force, power was still out to some 2.5 million customers due to damages, down from 3.5 million on Friday, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability claimed.

The state with the largest number of outages by far is still New Jersey with 32 percent of customers without power, it said it a report.

And as the lights begin to flicker on in Lower Manhattan, nine percent of customers across the state of New York still do not have power, followed by seven percent in Connecticut.

This comes as residents of the Rockaways in Queens continued to struggle without power, heat or food for a sixth day as their neighborhood slowly descended into chaos.

‘It’s chaos; it’s pandemonium out here,’ said Chris Damon, who had been waiting for 3.5 hours at the site and had circled the block five times. “It seems like nobody has any answers.”

Added Damon: ‘I feel like a victim of Hurricane Katrina. I never thought it could happen here in New York, but it’s happened.’

With little police presence on the storm-ravaged streets, many residents of the peninsula have been forced to take their protection into their own hands, arming themselves with guns, baseball bats and even bows and arrows to ward off thugs seeking to loot their homes…

City Councilman James Sanders said he fears that things are going to get even worse.

‘We have an explosive mix here,’ he said. ‘People will take matters into their own hands.’

Sanders has directed much of his anger and frustration at LIPA, calling on the City Council to investigate the utility for ignoring the Rockaways for so long.

‘LIPA has failed the people of the Rockaways,’ he said. ‘It’s a question of class… serving the richer areas of Long Island and ignoring the Rockaways…’

Stranded neighbors largely have been relying on volunteers delivering food, water and other basic necessities while the Red Cross and FEMA were still nowhere in sight…

In a Coney Island apartment block, where tenants huddle together in one room and human waste spills out of the toilet, tenant Jeffery Francis despairs that help is not getting to Brooklyn faster.

We are scavenging for food like animals,’ he told the New York Daily News. ‘We are in a crisis and no one will help us. Look at us. We are misery. Everyone cares about Manhattan. No one is looking out for us. Nothing…’

While power is likely to be returned to Manhattan’s East and West Villages, Financial District, Chelsea, Chinatown and the Lower East Side by the weekend, according to the power company Con Edison outages in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island are not expected to be repaired for another week.

Across Staten Island residents are also increasingly frustrated they are being passed over while other parts of New York and New Jersey receive aid and attention…

For power companies, the scale of the destruction was unmatched – more widespread than any blizzard or ice storm and worse than the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

‘It’s unprecedented: fallen trees, debris, the roads, water, snow. It’s a little bit of everything,’ said Brian Wolff, senior vice president of the Edison Electric Institute, a group that lobbies for utilities.

Initially, about 60 million people were without power in 8.2 million homes and businesses.

By Wednesday night, that number had fallen to roughly 44 million people in 6 million households and businesses and today around 3.6 million are without power.

Manhattan and Long Island getting power before the less affluent areas hit by the storm?  That sounds like what the Left claimed the Bush administration was doing in New Orleans.  Now either President Obama hates poor minorities, too.  Or neither he nor George W. Bush hate poor minorities.  More likely the Democrat-friendly media reported every New Orleans failing because they hated George W. Bush.  While they will make no such claims in the Sandy aftermath because they love President Obama.

It would probably be better to have a Republican in the White House during the Sandy recovery.  Because the media would be relentless attacking the administration for every misstep.  While a lesser federal effort under a Democrat administration will get a more positive treatment in the media.  So there would be more urgency under a Republican administration to help people than there would be under a Democrat administration.  Especially poor people and minorities.  Who the Left says Republicans hate.  Especially when this is happening a week before an election.

Had Sandy happened with George W. Bush in office running for reelection they would have excoriated him for hitting the campaign trail.  For not expending every last effort in the recovery process.  It would have been just like Katrina.  But President Obama can hit the campaign trail.  For he walked New Jersey with Governor Christie.  And that was enough.  Of course the people in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, New Jersey and in the other areas struggling to recover from Sandy probably want more.  Especially when they see the lights coming on in Manhattan when they have no power, food or heat.  And have to defend themselves from roving mobs of looters.

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