FUNDAMENTAL TRUTH #35: “Not only is ignorance bliss, but it’s a godsend to Big Government.” -Old Pithy

Posted by PITHOCRATES - October 12th, 2010

A Dumb Animal is a Content Animal

We had a customer once across from a slaughterhouse.  The customer is long gone.  But the slaughterhouse is still there.  I remember one cold December day.  It was close to the holidays.  A festive time.  Parked in the street were two cattle trucks.  You could see their breath puffing out through the slats.  They had no idea what was waiting for them once they left those trucks.  They just stood there.  Quiet.  And content.

I had a cat once that lived to a ripe old age.  In his old age, he suffered a stroke in his back end.  His rear legs weren’t that steady.  His feet kind of flopped around when he walked.  He spent most of his days in the basement on an old chair.  His water dish was underneath the chair.  And a litter box was only a few steps away.  We took food down to him.  But every hour or so he struggled up the steps to the food dish in my study.  He ate.  Then I picked him up and placed him on my lap for some petting.  He purred profusely.  After 10 minutes or so he squirmed to get down.  Ate some more.  Then limped back downstairs.  He was a shadow of his old nimble self.  But he was content.  To him, his life was normal.  He couldn’t dwell about what was.  Or what will be.  He just knew when his tummy was empty.  And when he craved affection.

In Gone with the Wind, when Atlanta was burning, Rhett Butler was helping Scarlet escape the city.  The fire panicked their horse, though.  It reared up and refused to move.  So Rhett covered the horse’s eyes and said something like, “You’ll like this better if you can’t see it.”  The horse calmed down.  The fire was still there all around them.  But the horse couldn’t see it.  And they made their escape with Rhett leading the blindfolded horse.

Dwelling on the Fear of the Unknown

Sure, they’re just dumb animals.  But are we really all that different?  Apart from having hands with opposable thumbs, consciousness, an advanced language, our use of tools and our farming and animal husbandry skills to provide an abundant food supply, no.  We prefer to not know unpleasant things.  Especially if there’s nothing we can do to prevent those unpleasant things from happening.  Or think too much about good things.  If there’s a chance we can spoil them.

A pitcher throwing a perfect game (27 up and 27 out) in the major leagues is rare.  It’s great when it happens.  And heart-breaking when batter 27 gets on base.  Whether by a base hit.  Or an error.  As a game moves ever closer to perfection, a deep dread and fear permeates everyone on that team.  They don’t want to be that guy that spoils the perfect game.  And they don’t talk about a perfect game lest they jinx it.  They try to act as if they don’t know what is about to happen.  To ignore the weight of the world crushing down on them.

Sometimes it’s not dwelling on the good that might not happen.  Sometimes it’s dwelling on the bad that may happen.  An infantry patrol going out behind enemy lines to snag some prisoners, for example.  It’s dangerous.  There’s a very good chance that some will not survive the patrol.  As your patrol waits for h-hour, you don’t look at your fellow soldiers and wonder who might die.  You don’t talk about it.  You just try to push it from your mind.  You go through the motions.  Machine-like.  Focus on the mission.  And your training.  And the next 5 minutes.  You try not to think too far beyond that because, well, you just don’t.  If something happens, it happens.  Thinking about it won’t make it not happen.  In fact, thinking about it may distract you a fraction of a second when the shooting starts and make it happen.

Sometimes it’s a cough that won’t go away.  Or a lump that wasn’t there before.  You get a sickening feeling when you think about what it may be.  So you try not to think about it.  You ignore it.  You get used to it.  Acclimate to it.  You don’t dwell on it.  Because the reality of it can be so unpleasant.  But resorting to pure animal ignorant bliss may very well kill you.  Sometimes we have to think about the unpleasant.  To dwell about what might be.  For if we do early enough, things don’t have to be as bad as they could be.

Have Food Will Bow

Life was pretty harsh until the British came around.  Their ideas about representative government and capitalism led to a freeing of the masses from a life of drudgery and suffering like no other people did.  From these ideals grew a new nation.  America.  And the Americans inspired an Old World nation.  France.

It is hard for people today to fully understand what life was like for the average person before the ideas of representative government and capitalism.  The average person was poor.  Not middle class.  But poor.  They lived in abject poverty.  They were overworked.  Under paid.  Oppressed.  Malnourished.  Emaciated.  They were miserable, wretched people living miserable, wretched lives.  Quite a difference from today where the average person is middle class and the poor are often overweight.  Even obese.

This life was commonplace when oppressive state powers were commonplace.  As the state’s power grew more limited, the average person’s life grew less miserable.  The poor in pre-revolutionary France, working some of Europe’s most arable soil under an absolute monarchy, suffered from recurring famine.  Meanwhile, over in the tiny island kingdom of Great Britain, a constitutional monarchy, they did not suffer recurring famines.  In fact, they were grain exporters.  That’s why there was no British Revolution to overthrow their monarchy as Europe trembled in the face of Napoleon’s advancing armies.  Life was pretty good on that tiny little island.

People are Just Dying to Get Out of their Socialist Utopias

There are great debates about which is better.  Capitalism or socialism.  People like to point to European socialism as the ideal.  These people are, in general, poor.  When the Beatles got obscenely rich, they fled that socialistic utopia.  As did others who struck it rich.  Why?  To keep what they had earned.

Because the vast majority is poor or middle class, we’ll never solve this debate.  The poor and middle class will feel little pity for the rich and approve of confiscatory taxation.  Until they become rich, that is.  But what about other countries?  Cuba?  North Korea?  The former Soviet Union?  The People’s Republic of China in the days of the great famines? 

Cubans boarded makeshift rafts and risked their lives to make it to Florida.  Those who could in North Korea, like pilots, defected and flew to South Korea.  The Soviet Union had to bribe and hold family members hostage to prevent their spies from defecting once they crossed over into the west.

The Soviet Union would eventually collapse and break out in capitalism.  Communist China allowed some capitalism to prevent a collapse.  Cuba was once a jewel in the Caribbean and now can’t even make a decent cigar.  The North Koreans are still suffering recurring famines and chronic energy shortages.  No, in these hardcore socialist states the message is clear.  Life for the average person is little better than it was in the Middle Ages.  And those who could escape their ‘utopias’ did.

Blinders are Okay if you’re a Horse

The scary thing is that these communist nations started out as people’s revolutions.  They attacked the rich.  Even the middle class.  They promised their people everything (more food, shorter working days, free universal health care, free universal education, etc.).  And, in most cases, failed to deliver.

These nations didn’t become totalitarian states overnight.  It was a process.  A process that went from good intentions to bad to worse.  And here we are in America.  Big Government promising us the same things.  Free food for the poor.  Shorter working days (by empowering unions).  Free universal health care (which is just one public option away).  And free college education for all. 

Should we be concerned?  Yes.  Because these stories always end the same.  After a people votes themselves the treasury, poverty and tyranny typically follow.  It’s like a cancer growing.  And we shouldn’t ignore it.  For if we do, it will only spread further.  And the further it spreads the harder it will be to get rid of it. 

America was the first republic not to collapse.  Can we continue to be that notable exception?  Not by wearing blinders.  As unpleasant it is, we must face this unpleasant truth.

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