NFL Cheerleaders are suing for a Livable Wage for their 300 Hours of Annual Work

Posted by PITHOCRATES - April 26th, 2014

Week in Review

If you were in the ‘in’ crowd in high school the most ‘in’ people were the quarterback of the football team and the head cheerleader.  Typically the best looking guy and girl in high school.  This is why girls want to be cheerleaders.  Because only pretty and popular girls are cheerleaders.  These girls don’t get paid.  And that’s okay.  Because they do it for the privilege of wearing that cheerleader uniform.  And being part of the ‘in’ crowd.

There’s a fascination with cheerleaders.  Men like them so much they made a porno movie about a girl trying to make a football cheerleader squad that wasn’t the Dallas Cowboy cheerleaders but looked like it was.  Debbie Does Dallas.  A porn bestselling video.  Because men like cheerleaders.  For they are toned, fit and beautiful.  And they wear revealing outfits.  Which is why NFL cheerleaders are sexy.

Women try hard to become NFL cheerleaders.  But only toned, fit and beautiful women get to be cheerleaders.  Which is why women work so hard to be toned, fit and beautiful.  So they can go to cheerleader tryouts and best the competition.  To win that honor of wearing an NFL cheerleader uniform.  At least, that’s how it has been until now (see String of Cheerleader Lawsuits the Next Headache for the NFL by Tierney Sneed posted 4/25/2014 on US News and World Report).

What will become of the Buffalo Jills, the cheerleaders that are on the sidelines for Buffalo Bills games? A lawsuit alleging lower than minimum wage earnings and other New York labor law violations filed by five former Buffalo Jills has caused the suspension of the squad, and taken with a pair of similar suits, is creating yet another public relations cloud over the National Football League.

Stephanie Mateczun – president of Stejon Productions Corp., the third-party production company that manages the Jills and was named in the suit alongside the team – confirmed the organization’s activities had ceased indefinitely as a result of the lawsuit, filed in New York Supreme Court Tuesday…

The Jills’ lawsuit is the third case to be brought up by an NFL team’s cheerleaders against their respective organization this year. Each case – the first, a class action suit filed in January against the Oakland Raiders, and the second, launched in February by a Ben-Gals cheerleader against the Cincinnati Bengals – is unique in its specifics…

The string of cases, as well as leaked copies of cheerleader handbooks from other teams, suggest the alleged mistreatment of cheerleaders is a league-wide problem. They are often paid per game, with hours spent practicing or at off-field events left uncompensated. They are also held to standards unthinkable in most workplaces: regular weigh-ins, costly requirements for certain hair and beauty treatments, and restrictions on who they date and what they post to social media…

Similar claims were made in the next suit to follow, filed by Ben-Gals’ cheerleader Alexa Brenneman against the Bengals in February. It suggests she made less than $2.85 an hour for her 300 hours of work during the season, well below Ohio’s $7.85 an hour minimum wage. The Jills suit likewise describes an alleged violation of New York minimum wage laws, and also details what it calls “demeaning and degrading treatment” at Jills events where the cheerleaders supposedly faced “lecherous stares,” “degrading sexual comments” and “inappropriate touching…”

“The issue here is … how we treat our workers in this country,” Dolce, of the Jills case, says – which is why he thinks the NFL should be paying attention as well. “I know it’s not a central issue for the NFL, but in terms of worker rights and human rights and gender politics, it shouldn’t just be ignored…”

The controversy isn’t sitting well with the NFL’s current  marketing outreach to female fans. A Change.org petition launched before the lawsuits were filed demands teams across the league provide their cheerleaders with livable salaries – and it has more than 100,000 signatures.

Livable salaries?  Cheerleading is not a job.  It’s a thing to do for fun.  That thing these women may enjoy unlike their day job.  Which provides their livable salaries.  Not their cheerleader earnings.  I mean, who can work only 300 hours a year and expect to pay all of their bills?

Cheerleading can’t be that horrible.  Because women go to cheerleader tryouts to make the squad.  And abide by all the rules to remain a cheerleader.  If it was so horrible they wouldn’t do this.  But they do.  And they’re not doing this for the money.  For we know they don’t make any money being a cheerleader.  No.  They do this because they love it.

You know who’s happy now?  Teams that don’t have cheerleaders.  And if they were considering adding them you can bet they won’t now.  In fact, those teams that do may consider dropping theirs.  For here’s a startling fact.  Cheerleaders don’t win games.  The only time most people even see them is coming out of a commercial break.  Then they’re gone.  As the football game fills widescreen televisions across the country.  They are trying to use cheerleaders to make the stadium experience special as a lot of people these days prefer watching football at home on their widescreen televisions.  Making it harder to sell out some home games.  But it is doubtful people are going to buy tickets for a game because they may be able to talk to a cheerleader.  No matter how pretty or sexy they are.  Because people love football more.

Teams may make some money with their cheerleaders.  But it’s probably not enough to justify these legal headaches.  So NFL cheerleaders may soon be a thing of the past.  Something most football fans probably won’t even notice.  For few in a big stadium can even see them.  And those watching on television may catch a glimpse of them but that’s not why they’re tuning in.  No, the people who will most notice the passing of the NFL cheerleader are the cheerleaders.  And the women who wanted to try out to become a cheerleader.  Something they may have dreamed about since high school.

www.PITHOCRATES.com

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Honda has New Electric Car that gets 118 Miles per Gallon of Gasoline

Posted by PITHOCRATES - June 10th, 2012

Week in Review

Honda is selling an electric car that can get 118 miles per gallon of gasoline.  Even though this car doesn’t consume a drop of gasoline to go those 118 miles (see Honda electric car gets 118 mpg, but costs add up by Jonathan Fahey and Tom Krisher, Associated Press, posted 6/7/2012 on Yahoo! Autos).

At 118 miles per gallon, the Honda Fit electric vehicle is the most fuel-efficient in the United States. But getting that mileage isn’t cheap — and it isn’t always good for the environment…

The electric Fit has an estimated price tag nearly twice as high as the gasoline-powered version. It would take 11 years before a driver makes up the difference and begins saving on fuel…

People drive an average of almost 13,500 miles a year, so a typical driver would spend $445 on electricity for an electric Fit over a year, and $1,552 on gasoline for a regular Fit…

A fully charged Fit EV can go 82 miles, meaning a daily commute could cost nothing for gasoline.

First of all the 118 miles per gallon is meaningless.  An electric car doesn’t go a single mile on gasoline.  So if you divide the miles you’ve driven by the amount of gasoline you used to go those miles you’re dividing by zero.  When you divide anything by zero you get infinity.  But 118 is NOT infinity.  So there is a formula they use to give you a comparable mpg by calculating cost per mile.  But as gasoline prices and driving distances vary this number is a moving number based on some assumptions.  And, in the end, meaningless.

And speaking of driving distances, who has ever leased a car?  I have.  My lease was for 15,000 miles per year, though.  Not 13,500.  And I went over on miles.  About 3,000 miles.  So let’s assume that the average miles people drive per year is 18,000.  If you divide 18,000 miles by 365 (the number of days in a year) you get 49.3 miles per day.  Leaving you a cushion of 32.7 miles (82-49.3).  Unless you’re running the air conditioner (or heater in winter).  If so subtract about 20% from that 82 miles.  Giving you a range of 65.6.  And a cushion of 16.3 miles.  Or less if you’re car pooling (more weight means shorter battery life).   Or if you’re stuck in rush hour traffic with the air conditioning (or heat) on.  Or run an after work errand.

Pretty soon you’ll be worrying about making it back home.  We call this range anxiety.  Also, few people own a car for 11 years.  The two-year lease is a popular lease for the car may remain under the factory warranty for the term of that lease.  But if you buy an electric car and hold it for 11 years to get your investment out of it there’s a chance it will be out of warranty when you’ll need some big ticket repairs.  Such as replacing the batteries.  It’s why a lot of people lease.  They’ll live with a car payment forever just to have a car that is no older than 2 years and will always start when they need it.  And never have to deal with the hassle of taking the car in for service.  Or get a very expensive out or warranty repair bill.

The electric car market is confusing.  Because we understand gasoline-powered cars.  We understand mileage.  How far we can go on a tank of gas.  And know that it takes only a few minutes to top off the tank.  Which feels like forever if you’re in a hurry.  Imagine having to wait an hour or two to recharge.  That will really feel like forever.  But if you never drive more than 20 miles a day and don’t care about cost savings, you can enjoy driving a car without ever having to visit another gas station.  Which wouldn’t be bad for a retiree.  But not very practical for someone who really puts some miles on a car.

www.PITHOCRATES.com

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,