France discourages Job Creation with a Short Workweek, Confiscatory Tax Rates and Banning Emails after 6 PM

Posted by PITHOCRATES - April 12th, 2014

Week in Review

For socialism to work you need businesses to provide jobs.  Because without people working the government can’t have confiscatory tax rates to fund a massive socialist state.  You’ve got to have jobs.  Which confiscatory tax rates tend to discourage.  For business and rich investors don’t want to pay confiscatory tax rates.  François Hollande ran on a socialist platform in France.  Promising to raise taxes to bring down the deficit.  Which he did.  Raise taxes.  But it didn’t lower an unemployment rate stubbornly staying above 10%.

High taxes and a poor economy caused the socialists to lose elections.  So Hollande is putting together a tax-cutting package.  To reverse their electoral losses.  You’d think the socialists would have learned their lessons that the people want jobs.  And to have jobs you need a business-friendly environment.  Which something like this is not going to help (see France bans work e-mail after 6 p.m. by John Johnson, Newser, posted 4/11/2014 on USA Today).

France already has a 35-hour work week, and a new rule is designed to make sure that it doesn’t start shading toward 40 hours because of work-related e-mail.

The Guardian reports that the rule forbids workers from checking their phones or computers for work stuff after 6 p.m., and it forbids employers from pressuring them to do so.

The move apparently doesn’t affect all workers in France, but it does cover about 1 million workers in the tech industry — including French employees of Google and Facebook…

At Fox Business, a U.S. labor expert finds it hard to believe the IT industry can manage such a draconian shut-off time.

“There’s always something going wrong off the clock — when a computer goes down, it doesn’t go down between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.”

It’s yet another thing to discourage business.  Things happen after hours.  Can you imagine a business wanting to open themselves to that kind of liability?  Having someone in the company send out an email without checking the clock first?  Or someone working late into the evening to catch up on a project.  Sending out a bunch of emails so people could read them first thing in the morning.  If someone else is working late do they read this email?  Perhaps this person was waiting for this email and would like to address it that evening to reduce his or her workload the following day.  Would this worker have been pressured into reading the email knowing his or her boss would have appreciated the extra effort?

There’s a reason why General Motors (GM) went bankrupt.  Well, there are a few of them.  But one of them was costly workplace rules.  Such as only allowing an electrician to change a light bulb at a work station.  Even if the person at that workstation could have changed that bulb in a couple of minutes.  Instead of waiting an hour or so for skilled trades to come around to unscrew the burnt out lamp and screw in a new lamp.

These little workplace rules add up.  And though seemingly harmless when you look at them one at a time in the aggregate they increase the cost of business.  A lot.  Just ask GM.  Something businesses look at when they are considering the location of a new factory.  Whether to expand production at an existing factory.  Or whether to shut down a factory and move production out of the country to a more business-friendly environment.  Thus killing job creation.  Jobs the socialists need for people to have so they can pay confiscatory taxes on their earnings.

A business unfriendly environment will never lower the unemployment rate.  As the socialists in France have proven.  And left-leaning governments everywhere have proven.  Confiscatory tax rates do not attract businesses.  Or rich investors.  They discourage them.  And encourage them to take their money and invest it elsewhere.  And create jobs elsewhere.  In another country that is a little kinder to business.  And job creation.

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Email, Texting and Online Bill Paying is doing to Canada Post what it did to the USPS

Posted by PITHOCRATES - January 19th, 2014

Week in Review

The United States Postal Service (USPS) is going broke.  Thanks to email, texting and online bill paying.  Making the USPS more and more irrelevant these days.  And it’s not just the USPS having this problem (see Ontario mother with sick child urges Canada Post to keep door-to-door delivery by The Canadian Press posted 1/13/2014 on City News Toronto).

An online petition urging Canada Post to reconsider its decision to end door-to-door delivery in urban centres has garnered more than 120,000 signatures…

Canada Post announced some dramatic changes to its operations last month, including plans to phase out the age-old tradition of home delivery in urban areas. The company said that without postal carriers travelling by foot, it would save a significant amount of money…

The petition — posted on the website change.org — draws attention to anyone in Canada who has limited mobility, such as the elderly or disabled, and the possibly dangerous effects this change could have on their lives…

Hamilton said that Canada Post is trying to maintain service to all Canadians but that they need to find innovative ways to do it in order to remain self-sufficient.

Canada Post had projected an annual loss of $1 billion dollars a year by 2020 if they were to continue with the door-to-door delivery.

Part of the reason why Canada can’t afford to keep urban delivery is because they have single-payer health care.  Which is pretty costly.  Especially with Canada having what all advanced economies have.  An aging population.  Which means more people are leaving the workforce and consuming taxpayer benefits than there are people entering the workforce paying taxes.  And with better health care people are living longer into retirement.  Which forces tax rates higher on the working (i.e., the young and healthy) to pay for those not working.

It is interesting that the same people, the young and healthy, are the ones destroying Canadian Post.  For they’re the ones emailing, texting and paying bills online.  Which means they will have to raise taxes further on the young and healthy to support the older generation.  Transferring more and more costs from the old to the young.  Which is what happens in a socialist country.  Generational theft.  Costs keep rising so people have smaller families.  Causing the population to age.  And requiring ever higher tax rates on those in the workforce to pay for the growing numbers who have left the workforce.

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The Cruel March of Technology now has the USPS in its Crosshairs

Posted by PITHOCRATES - August 3rd, 2013

Week in Review

The United States is not the only country trying to figure out what to do with a dated institution long past its prime that few people use these days.  Something that was a large part of our parents’ lives.  But becoming more and more meaningless to the younger generations.   The Postal Service (see Canada Post needs to reduce home delivery by Daniel Fontaine posted 7/31/2013 on Vancouver 24 hrs).

The reality today is tech-savvy Canadians are no longer enamoured with their postal service, nor do they rely upon it to operate their daily lives. Thanks to online banking, e-mail, scanners and texting, Canada Post and its costly, outdated service look ancient by comparison…

Today, door-to-door mail service in many rural or even less-populated urban areas is no longer an option. Canada Post abandoned the front-door policy in new subdivisions, instead favouring group mailboxes…

… would it really impact those getting home delivery if they received their mail only twice a week? I doubt it would make a whit of difference — except perhaps to the bottom line of Canada Post. Reducing home delivery means paying fewer postal workers and a more efficient operation…

But don’t expect the public-sector unions and a majority of home-delivery recipients to let daily mail service go without a fight, even if the business case no longer exists to maintain this costly level of service.

The United States Postal Service (USPS) has been on life-support for a long time.  First it was email.  Then ecommerce.  Then online bill paying.  Then texting.  With FedEx and UPS delivering the things we buy on line with our tablets and smartphones what’s left for the USPS?  Besides junk mail?  Even the Social Security Administration uses e-banking.  The volume of mail has fallen so far that they cannot raise stamp prices high enough to cover their operating costs and fund their pension plan.  Unless they can get people to mail a postcard for $57.  Or more.

There used to be video stores all over the place.  As renting videotapes was a booming business at one time.  But the same reasons that have made the USPS obsolete have made the video store obsolete.  There are still a few around.  But it is hard to compete with vending machines renting movies at the grocery store.  And watching them over the Internet.  Where they can charge less as they don’t have the costs of a brick and mortar store to pay for.  And this is the problem the USPS has.  There are less costly and faster alternatives available.  Why pay to mail a letter that will take days to travel to the recipient when you can email something for free that arrives seconds after sending?  Even the video stores don’t have competition that bad.

Remember receiving a telegram?  Probably not.  Something else that has long since fallen by the wayside.  The telephone put that to rest.  Today people can call with bad news.  They don’t have to send a telegram.  Putting a lot of telegram deliverers out of a job.  But life went on.

So perhaps it’s time to pull the plug on the USPS.  Or greatly reduce the service.  Maybe twice a week.  For let’s face it, nothing good comes in the mail these days anyway.  Bills, junk mail and jury duty summons.  Things we just won’t mind waiting an extra week to get.

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Email and Electronic Bill Paying as well as Retiree Benefits are Bankrupting the U.S. Postal Service

Posted by PITHOCRATES - February 10th, 2013

Week in Review

The United States is not the only country having trouble with their postal service.  Email and electronic bill paying have taken away a huge source of revenue for the postal service in the US.  As well as in the UK (see Post Office will shut one in five branches after ‘losing £40m a year’ by Anna Edwards posted 2/7/2013 pm the Daily Mail).

The Post Office said they were losing £40 million [$63 million US] a year, so it was seeking retail partners for 70 branches, enabling them to stay in their current locations…

CWU general secretary Billy Hayes said the announcement was a ‘huge blow’ to the Post Office network, saying: ‘Staff will be in shock at the scale of what will effectively be the closures of Crown post offices across the country.

‘This move will have a huge impact on the high streets of small towns earmarked to lose their Crown post office.

‘These offices provide a dedicated specialist service to communities which will not be replicated by a window or two in a bigger shop…

‘It leaves huge questions about the future of the Post Office – how can it realistically deliver services for passport applications, identity services and a range of financial services while being dramatically pruned back? What does it mean for Metropolitan Police plans to move into London post offices?’

Robert Hammond, of Consumer Focus, said: ‘The Post Office network must change if it is to be sustainable.

‘These changes to Crown post offices are part of the biggest-ever programme of change to the network and consumers will want to see Post Office services that are high-quality and accessible, and offer the products and services they need. This is more important than the issue of who operates the post office itself.

People are using Royal Mail less in the UK.  So to save the postal service the UK is taking drastic action.  Basically privatizing as much of it as they can.  By partnering with other retail outlets that can cut the overhead cost of standalone post offices.  Some people may not be happy about these developments.  But it’s their own fault for using email.  And paying their bills online.  If they want to keep the postal service this may be their only chance.  Something the Americans should consider.  Based on the money they’re losing (see Postal Service loses less, but still in trouble by Jennifer Liberto posted 2/8/2013 on CNN Money).

In the three months ended Dec. 31, the agency lost $1.3 billion — considerably less than the $3.3 billion lost in the year-earlier period.

The service was hurt as the volume of first-class mail, which most consumers use to pay bills and stay in touch, decreased by 4.5.%, said USPS chief financial officer Joseph Corbett. But it got help as shipping and package volume for the busy holiday season increased 4% compared to the prior year.

Still, the service is in trouble. The key culprit remains a 2006 congressional mandate, under which it has to pre-fund healthcare benefits for future retirees. The USPS has been borrowing billions of dollars from taxpayers to make up for the shortfalls…

The Postal Service on Wednesday unveiled a plan to end Saturday delivery of mail, a move which is expected to save $2 billion a year, a drop in the bucket compared to the $16 billion loss the organization reported for 2012.

The US has about 5-times the population of the UK.  So if we multiplied their losses (in US dollars) by 5 it comes to $316 million.  A far cry from the $16 BILLION lost in 2012.  The U.S. Postal Service has a far greater crisis on its hands than the Royal Mail.  And it goes to that unfunded retiree health care plan that the U.S. government is now forcing them to fund.  Compounding the problem of email and electronic bill paying.

Employers who provide retiree pensions and health care benefits are supposed to put money aside for their current workers’ retirement.  In accounting terminology, this retirement expense should be expensed on the income statement (lowering profits) with a credit going to the balance sheet to show the money owed.  A liability.  When a person retires and starts incurring retirement costs the employer pays for these and debits that liability account.  Reducing it.  And credits a cash account.  Reducing it.  When an employer pays a retiree it should be entirely a balance sheet transaction.  Completely off the income statement.  With no impact on profitability.  This payment should reduce their cash balances.  As well as their liability account for retirees.  For as they pay their retirees it reduces what they owe their retirees.

The U.S. Postal Service didn’t do this.  They simply paid and expensed these retirement benefits as they incurred them.  Greatly understating their retirees’ costs.  And overstating their profitability.  Leaving a massive unfunded retiree health care liability.  Funding this massive unfunded liability is bankrupting the U.S. Postal Service.  Or rather these massive retiree costs they were hiding off the books are now bankrupting the U.S. Postal Service.  Unions want to go back to NOT funding these retirement costs.  And have the U.S. taxpayer bail them out.  Just like they bailed out the UAW retirement plans when GM and Chrysler went bankrupt.

The U.S. needs not only to privatize portions of the U.S. Postal Service like the UK they also need to privatize pensions and health care plans.  Like most businesses have.  Give employees money to put away for their own retirement needs.  For the old ways just don’t work anymore.

Funny how progressives hate all of the other old ways.  Like thrift, going to church, waiting until marriage before having sex, etc.  But pensions?  Retiree health care benefits?  No, when it comes to these things they’re all for going back to the Fifties.

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Personal Computer, Commodore 64, IBM PC, DOS, Macintosh, Mouse, GUI, Modem, Internet, HTML, URL and World Wide Web

Posted by PITHOCRATES - August 7th, 2012

History 101

The IBM PC operating DOS set one Standard for the Personal Computer

The first personal computer (PC) appeared in the Sixties.  (People called these first PCs ‘minicomputers’.  But we’ll use the term PC to cover all work and home single-user computer systems.)  These first PCs were little more than a programmable calculator.  Not very useful in most homes.  PCs got a little more useful in the Seventies.  The Commodore PET, the Apple II and Radio Shack TRS-80 hit store shelves in the Seventies.  And if you were a school boy without a girlfriend chances were that you were home playing games on these PCs.  Some were even writing programs.  So these PCs offered an exciting new world for geeks and nerds.  But offered little to their sisters and parents.

In the early Eighties one of the most popular PCs hit the market.  The Commodore 64.  Which offered better graphics.  And accessories like tape drives, disc drives, joy sticks and printers.  Allowing better gaming.  And the beginning of business programs.  Like a database program.  Sure, it was primitive.  And you needed a TV to use the Commodore 64.  But it was state of the art then.  Kids who played with these PCs gave up a lot of their youth to these machines.  But other than those fascinated by technology (and ardent fans of Star Trek), few others were interested in the PC in the early Eighties.  It just wasn’t anything the masses were demanding.

Then came the IBM PC.  This set one standard for the personal computer.  And we call every personal computer that uses the IBM platform a PC.  This PC came with its own monitor.  That was one color.  Monochromatic.  Either green.  Or amber.  The monitor sat on the computer box.  In the front of the box were two 5-1/4 floppy disc drives.  State of the art then.  Extinct dinosaurs today.  Businesses started buying these for the word processing and spreadsheet programs they could run.  But the PCs themselves weren’t very people friendly.  Before you could use your word processing or spread sheet program you had to boot up your computer with DOS first.  DOS was the disc operating system that made the computer work.  In those early days you had to type a DOS command to get those word processing and spreadsheet programs to start.  It required even more DOS mastery to do some basic things like installing a printer or copying a disc.  Making these PCs complicated machines that most people still did not see any reason to buy one.

The Defense Department’s ARPA created the ARPANET which was the Forerunner to the Internet

Then came 1984.  And the Macintosh computer (the Mac).  The other computer standard.  And rival to IBM.  And like their iconic Super Bowl ad said, it changed the world.  The Mac introduced us to the mouse.  And the graphical user interface (GUI).  Which Xerox actually created during the early Seventies but didn’t do anything with it.  But a guy by the name of Steve Jobs did.  He incorporated it into the Mac and made using a computer a whole lot easier.  The PC makers soon followed, adding a mouse and the Windows GUI to the PC.  Computers were never easier to use.  Businesses began buying computers in droves.  People were even bringing them into their homes.  Primarily for gaming.  Though some were using personal finance programs to pay their bills.  Writing letters and addressing envelopes.   And a few other things.  But the masses weren’t buying them yet.  Because there was little the masses could do on these remarkable machines.

Computer scientist JCR Licklider left Bolt, Beranek and Newman (BBN) to head the Behavioral Sciences and Command and Control programs at the Defense Department’s Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA).  He had an idea about making computers talk to each other.  Distant computers.  Others continued his work at ARPA.  Eventually issuing a request for quotation to connect the powerful computers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the Stanford Research Institute’s Augmentation Research Center, the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) and University of Utah.  BBN won the contract.  Built the network between these computers.  And on October 29, 1969, they sent the first message over the ARPANET.  An incredible achievement.  It was paradigm changing.  The Department of Defense had just created the Internet.  And the world would never be the same.  In another 20 years or so, that is.

The birth of the Internet in 1969 meant nothing to the masses.  The only people using it were computer people working on big, powerful computers located only at universities and research facilities.  Who could share these incredible computing resources.  But the masses had no concept of computer networks.  And weren’t asking for this technology.  They wanted other things during the Seventies.  And were only warming up to computers during the Eighties.  It was going to take a lot more to get the masses interested in this new technology.  Something that made it fun.  Without having to learn a lot of new stuff.  Something that was no more difficult than watching television.

A Favorable Business Climate in the Eighties created a High Tech Boom and ushered in the World Wide Web

As the Internet grew it allowed more computers to network with each other.  Sort of like having a new system of interstate highways.  A quick way to get places.  But unlike the interstate highways the Internet didn’t have tourist attractions and destinations of interest to go to.  At least, not yet.  And then came along Tim Berners-Lee.  Sir Timothy John “Tim” Berners-Lee these days.  Thanks to a knighthood bestowed by Queen Elizabeth II.  He helped to populate the Internet with destinations of interest.  He created a ‘web’ of hypertext documents that sat on servers.  People with computers could access these servers via their modems.  At first with dial-up modems that took forever to download anything off of the World Wide Web.  Then with broadband high speed modems.  These would connect them to the Internet.  The HyperText Markup Language (HTML) provided a common programming language for these interconnected computers.  The uniform resource locator (URL) provided a unique destination address for each thing (document, picture, video, etc.) on the World Wide Web.  And a web browser provided the virtual car to travel the Internet to these destinations of interests at various URLs all across the web.

Of course, none of this would have been possible with only those early PCs running DOS.  It was the marriage of the mouse, the GUI and the World Wide Web that made using the Internet fun and as easy as watching television.  Surfing the Internet took off in the Nineties because you could read, watch and listen to anything on the web without knowing the first thing about computer programming.  Even our parents could use email so deftly that first class mail may soon be joining the 5-1/4 floppy drive into extinction.  Along with the printed telephone directory.  And the printed newspaper.  Everything we want to know, look-up, enjoy, share, etc., is online these days.  We can even live-stream movies to our television via our PC connected to the Internet.  We bank, shop, chat and use social media like Twitter and Facebook.  We now have smartphones that can do all of this for us.  As well as take pictures and post them online.

People now use this technology throughout their day.  And most can’t imagine living without it.  This all starting with technology in the Sixties that people didn’t know a thing about.  Didn’t understand it.  And never asked for it.  But a few individuals advanced this technology.  Then some companies figured out how to commercialize it.  To make us demand something that didn’t exist only a short time earlier.  And once they explained why we had to have this technology we had to have it.  And now can’t live without it.  Proving Say’s law.  Supply creates demand.  And disproving Keynesian economics.  For demand didn’t make any of this happen.  Supply did.  A favorable business climate in the Eighties (low taxes, low regulatory burdens, sound monetary policy, etc.) created a high tech boom.  That showered us with high-tech toys.  And ushered in the next big thing.  The World Wide Web.

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NHS Doctors compromise Patient Privacy by Accidentally Clicking on ‘cc’ Instead of ‘bcc’ when Emailing

Posted by PITHOCRATES - June 3rd, 2012

Week in Review

One of my favorite Winter Olympics were the 1992 games in Albertville, France.  In part to that montage at the end accompanied by a couple pieces from Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana.  And Charles Kuralt.  Who gave us charming slices of life in the Tarentaise Valley.  Farmers eating a breakfast of cheese and wine after finishing their early chores…before the sun had risen.  And people waiting for freshly baked baguettes in the crisp predawn hours.  Made by bakers the way bakers had baked bread hundreds of years earlier.  Because as Charles said, sometimes the old ways are the better ways.  It turns out that’s true in more ways than one (see Doctors ‘risking email privacy breaches’ by Caroline Parkinson posted 6/1/2012 on BBC News Health).

As the email whizzes off into the ether, dread strikes. It’s gone to the wrong person.

Normally, the worst that can happen is a little embarrassment.

But a medical advice body is warning that while trying to use modern technology to contact patients, doctors are sometimes revealing confidential information…

In one case a practice sent patients an email reminder for a flu vaccination clinic, but mistakenly pasted the email addresses into the “To” rather than the “Bcc” – blind copies – box…

The MDU is issuing advice to doctors about how to send out group emails, and what to do if it goes wrong.

“These are breaches of confidence. It shows those in the email group that other individuals are part of that practice, and part of that particular group.

“And, while you may not be directly releasing clinical information, it can be possible for people to make assumptions, especially in small communities.

“For example, on a flu jab reminder list, you may be on there because you are immunosuppressed, because you have cancer or HIV – or other reasons you don’t want people to know about.”

In the old days there were family doctors.  Who we knew all our lives.  And we paid them for the services they rendered.  In the days before heath insurance became an employee benefit.   And life was good.  Charming.  Folksy.  But now health care has grown into a great bureaucracy.  Where doctors have to spend more of their time being bureaucrats than doctors.  With the advent of employer provided health insurance there were no longer free market forces to determine health care prices.  Because someone else was paying the bill.  Then came the lawyers.  And the malpractice suits.  Changing medicine into a defensive action against frivolous lawsuits.  Further increasing health care costs.  And pulling health care providers further away from practicing medicine.  Instead spending their time managing risk. 

Now Obamacare wants to change this further.  By digitizing medical records.  Turning health care into production line care.  To process more people per hour to reduce costs.  Transforming the doctor-patient relationship to a patient-random government bureaucrat relationship.  Relying on the data in our records more than personal knowledge of a patient like in those folksy old days.  Which can really speed up treatment.  As long as an overworked, underpaid bureaucrat inputs all of the data correctly.  And no hacker breaks into the system to mess with people’s data.  Or steal it.  For it will be one large repository of names, addresses, phone numbers and social security numbers.  As well as intimate medical information.  Which people could use for whole sorts of reasons.  The mind shudders to think what may happen when this information is in the hands of the wrong people.  Especially when health care providers begin emailing each other.  With attachments.  Or their patients.  Like in Britain.  Accidents happen.  Especially when the technology makes it so easy for accidents to happen. 

Doctors are at risk of being in breach of both the Data Protection Act 1998 and the Privacy and Electronic Communications regulations 2003 – and the Information Commissioner would have to be informed.

A spokesman for the Information Commissioner’s office said GP practices, like hospital trusts and local councils had a responsibility to take care of the data they hold.

He added: “Bcc and group emails are a concern. If we find a breach related to Bcc, and particularly if that’s caused damage or distress, we would take enforcement action.”

As if doctors didn’t have enough to worry about in their busy day.  Being both bureaucrat.  And part-time doctor.  Now they have to worry about breaking the law when they accidentally click ‘cc’ instead of ‘bcc’ after a long, sleep-deprived day.

And this is a glimpse into the future of Obamacare.  Where we can only hope it will be as good as the NHS.  For as national health care systems go, it’s one of the best.  But it still doesn’t beat the good old days.  When we had warm familial relationships with our family doctors.  Who knew us better than we knew ourselves.  Who didn’t need digital records or emails.  And not only were we able to pay for our own health care but we liked our health care.

It’s like Charles said.  Sometimes the old ways are the better ways.

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The U.S. Postal Service is One of the Biggest and Least Successful Companies of All Time

Posted by PITHOCRATES - May 5th, 2012

Week in Review

The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) may not be part of the government.  But it sure acts like it is (see As a private firm the US Postal Service would rank 35th on the Fortune 500 list, but it would also be bankrupt posted 5/5/2012 on The Economist).

AT THE bottom of its press releases the US Postal Service brags that if it were a private company, it would rank 35th on the Fortune 500 list. Were it a private firm, it would also be bankrupt. The service loses $25m a day.

Hit hard by the recession and the march towards electronic mail, the Postal Service is in desperate need of reform…

A normal business could not operate like this. Over three-quarters of America’s post offices do not make a profit. Take, for example, the office in Alix, Arkansas, which last year cost $48,452 to run and brought in just $3,642 in revenue. Its earnings may be thinned by the presence of eight other post offices in an 11-mile radius. Under the Senate bill, the Alix office would remain open…

A more pressing concern for the service involves payments into a health-benefits fund for the future retired…

The focus will now shift to the House, which is considering a postal-reform bill of its own. Its author, Darrell Issa, a Republican from California, plans to end Saturday delivery and establish a financial-control board with a mandate to cut costs. His bill would take politics out of the process by creating an independent commission to oversee the closure of post offices. And it would aim to bring the pay of postal employees into line with the private sector.

The solution is easy to some.  Get rid of email.  Text messaging.  And paying your bills online.  That’s the solution they’ve used elsewhere in the economy to protect a dying industry from a higher quality, lower cost competitor.  They used tariffs to protect the U.S. automotive industry.  And as a result they have lost all but a fraction of the global market.  They’ve passed labor laws favoring higher cost union labor.  And chased manufacturers out of the country.  The Labor Department sued Boeing for building a new 787 Dreamliner plant in a nonunion state.  Because they wanted those planes to be built with costlier union labor.  Making them less competitive with Airbus.  Who continues to expand their market share.  So why not get rid of email?  It would be no more foolish than past solutions.

Of course, they can’t do that.  Too many young people enjoy emailing and texting.  And everything else in the digital world.  They can increase the price of a car or a plane ticket without it affecting your every waking moment.  You can’t do that with the Internet.  For the American youth have a fever.  And the only prescription is more Internet access.  Or more cowbell.  And if you take that away to save something they don’t use that will come back to bite them in the buttocks in the first election following that action.  And that’s a problem.  Because the youth don’t care about past institutions or economics.  Their world is centered on them.  And if you mess with their immediate pleasures in life they will punish you at the polls.

So the solution to the USPS may have to be a real solution.  To address the real problems.  Which are simple.  There isn’t enough paper mail to support the current size of the USPS.  Or the current budget.  So you’re going to have to close some offices.  Some sorting centers.  And other infrastructure.  Most important of all you’re going to have to cut the payroll.  Letting people go.  And reducing their pay and benefit packages for those who stay.  Including those for retirees.  Like they do in the real world.  It’s either that or figuring out a way to put a stamp on an email.  Which past postmasters have thought about.  And are no doubt thinking about again.  If they can just figure a way to blame George W. Bush.  Or the Republicans.  Because young people already hate them. 

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