Birth Control and Abortion may lead to Higher Incidences of Birth Defects

Posted by PITHOCRATES - February 10th, 2013

Week in Review

When we interfere with natural physiological functions of the human body bad things happen.  People who smoke a lot of cigarettes can get emphysema, lung cancer and heart disease.  People who drink excessive amounts of alcohol can suffer from liver disease.  Consuming too much sugar can lead to diabetes.  Drinking contaminated water can lead to dysentery and cholera.  If we take too many blows to the head we can suffer brain damage.  And so on.

The human body is an incredibly complex machine.  With many subsystems doing remarkable things.  And any time we interfere with these systems bad things happen.  Our doctors warn us all the time not to interfere with the normal functioning of these systems.  And they do this for all systems save one.  The reproductive system (see Older mothers driving up birth defect rate by Stephen Adams posted 2/6/2013 on The Telegraph).

Increasing numbers of older mothers and use of IVF has led to a marked increase in the number of babies born with birth defects since the 1980s, say researchers.

They looked at 5.4 million births across 14 European countries between 1984 and 2007.

They found that the rate of multiple births had increased by about 50 per over that timescale; while the rate of those births which also had congenital birth defects had doubled…

Professor Helen Dolk, from the Centre for Maternal Fetal and Infant Research, University of Ulster, and the co-author of the study, said: “The increase in multiple birth rates may be explained by changes in maternal age and increased use of assisted reproductive technology (ART).

“It is clear that more research needs to be done to determine the contribution of ART to the risk of congenital anomalies in multiple births.”

The study, based on data from a network of clinicians called the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT), is published in the journal BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Women attack their reproductive systems for years.  They take birth control.  Such as hormonal contraceptives.  Which prevent the physiological process the body is trying to do.  They have abortions.  Which interrupts the physiological change their body is going through.  While their bodies try to conceive women fight against this physiological process for years.  Delaying their child-bearing years.  Which is unnatural.  In fact, the female body is trying to conceive a child long before a girl is emotionally mature and even capable of caring for a child.

Before the sexual revolution most women were married and having their children in their twenties.  Allowing their bodies to complete the physiological process they were trying to complete.  So it’s no surprise that altering this physiological process may lead to complications in birth.  As well as a rise in breast cancer that also shows some correlation between birth control and abortion.

Incidences of birth defects and breast cancer have risen since the sexual revolution of the Sixties.  There could be other contributing factors.  But the prevention and delaying of a natural physiological process may be complicit in the rise of birth defects and breast cancer.  Just as smoking cigarettes can cause emphysema, lung cancer and heart disease.  Just as drinking excessive amounts of alcohol can cause liver disease.  Just as consuming too much sugar can cause diabetes.  Just as drinking contaminated water can lead to dysentery and cholera.  And just as too many blows to the head can cause brain damage.  Unnatural attacks on these physiological systems can all lead to bad things happening later in life.  And probably should be avoided.

Women may benefit by having their children earlier rather than later.  And once they have their children the use of birth control and abortion will be moot in regards to birth defects.  For they will not be having children that these physiologically altering processes can affect.

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Wells, Cesspools, Night Soil, 1854 Broad Street Cholera Outbreak, Fresh Water, Sanitation, 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami

Posted by PITHOCRATES - April 10th, 2012

History 101

Overflowing Cesspools in 1854 London led to a Cholera Outbreak along Broad Street

People eat and drink.  And, as a consequence, they poop and pee.  This made moving into cities a little more complicated than living in the country.  Or on a farm.  Where you drilled a well for your drinking water.  And built an outhouse (or privy) to do your business in.  Basically a small structure over a hole in the ground to provide a little privacy while you contemplated world affairs.  You kept the two separated so your business didn’t seep into the water table that fed your well.  As people moved into cities they brought their poop and pee with them.  Obviously.  And before plumbing and sanitary sewer systems people used chamber pots and dumped them out of their windows after using them.  Or built cesspits (or cesspools) to store their human waste.  Under their houses.  Where the liquid would leach into the ground.  While the solids broke down.  As the pile of the remaining solid waste grew men came around at night to remove this ‘night soil’.  Which they turned into fertilizer.

There were drawbacks with this, though.  For human waste is full of disease-causing pathogens.  Which made it a little risky to use as fertilizer.  Worse were these disease-causing pathogens leaching into our drinking water.  Which it did in London.  In 1854.  In the Soho district of London.  Where the new sanitary sewers did not yet reach.  On Broad Street.  That ran along the River Thames.  Where the water table is relatively high.  So when you drill a well you don’t have to go too deep.  Or you could get your water directly from the River Thames.  As the city’s population grew more and more people packed into houses.  Greatly increasing the production of human waste.  Quickly filling the cesspools beneath their homes.  And as they filled to capacity they overflowed.  And leached into that high water table.  And into the River Thames.   Which took in this burgeoning growth of disease-causing pathogens.

But then people start getting sick.  A lot of them even dying.  From a nasty outbreak of cholera.  Spread by disease-causing pathogens.  Back then people thought ‘bad air’ caused cholera to spread.  As well as other diseases.  Something John Snow refused to believe.  So he studied the pattern of deaths.  And he found a common factor.  The people who were dying drew their water from the public pump on Broad Street.  Determining that the source of the cholera outbreak wasn’t ‘bad air’.  But bad water.  Coming from that pump.  Contaminated from those overflowing cesspools.  Such that people were drinking their own waste.  This marked a new beginning in public health.  And public sanitation.  Perhaps the greatest of public goods that allows people to live in crowded cities.

The 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami took out the Systems that kept Wastewater from Contaminating Fresh Drinking Water 

As cities and regions became more populated this balancing act of fresh water and sanitation became more critical.  Where fresh water flowed into our homes and wastewater flowed out and into the sanitary sewer system.  And on to the wastewater treatment plant.  Where treatment made the water safe to reenter the ecosystem.  And our drinking water supplies.  If all the pieces worked well the water flowed in only one direction.  Towards the wastewater treatment plant.  But if something should happen to interrupt or reverse that flow the wastewater would contaminate our drinking water.  And, sadly, something often happens.  Events that damage the infrastructure that manages that flow.  Such as war.  Earthquakes.  And tsunamis.

An earthquake in the Indian Ocean on Sunday, December 26, 2004, created a massive tsunami.  Sending walls of water as high as 50 feet crashing into Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka, India and other coastal regions surrounding the Indian Ocean.  The damage these waves caused was devastating.   The advancing water just swept away communities on the shore.  After the waves receded more than 150,000 were dead or missing.  Millions were homeless.  In a hot and humid climate.  Where corpses everywhere began to decompose.  And injured people with open wounds invited infection.  As bad as the horror of that day was there might be worse yet to come.  For the conditions were perfect for pandemic disease.  For included in that destruction was the infrastructure that managed that water flow to wastewater treatment plants.

This was the greatest fear.  The tsunami waves wiped out the electrical grids that powered the pumps that maintained that water flow.  So the wastewater backed up into the drinking water.  Dense populations in tropical conditions with no fresh drinking water available to drink and with raw sewage backing up into the streets spelled a world of trouble.  Because people need to eat and drink.  And, as a consequence, they poop and pee.  But when the infrastructure is gone that separates the one from the other humans can’t live for long.  Because their waste is full of disease-causing pathogens.  Especially when the prevailing weather conditions create a natural incubator for these diseases.

In America’s most Populated Cities you can Turn On Any Water Tap and Drink the Water without Worrying about Cholera

Thankfully those areas hit by the 2004 tsunami did not suffer greater population losses due to outbreaks of cholera, diphtheria, dysentery, typhoid or hepatitis A and B.  Thanks to a fast-acting international community.  Providing some $14 billion in humanitarian aid.  Delivered in large part by the U.S. Navy and other military forces.  Who possessed the resources to move that aid inland to where the people needed it.  Chief among that aid was fresh drinking water.  And sanitation facilities.  To prevent the spread of disease.

It took some time to understand the connection between clean drinking water and public health.  But people did have some understanding.  Which is why a lot of people drank beer in early communities.  Because the brewing process killed the pathogens in the water.  Perhaps our first water treatment process.  They may not have known this.  They may just have correlated drinking beer to healthier living.  A good a reason as any to drink and be merry.  For those who drank beer did not suffer some of the same diseases that befell others.  As in the cholera outbreak in 1854 London.  Where the monks in a monastery adjacent to the outbreak area escaped the pandemic.  Why?  Because they only drank the beer they brewed.

Americans travelling to Mexico are careful about what they drink.  Drinking only bottled water.  Or beer and liquor.  To escape an unpleasant condition that can result from drinking the local water which is not as ‘treated’ as it is in the U.S.  Emphasizing a point few appreciate in America’s most populated cities.  Where you can turn on any water tap and drink the water that comes out of it without ever worrying about cholera, diphtheria, dysentery, typhoid or hepatitis A and B.  Which we’ve only been able to do for about a century or so in America.  While poor and developing countries are still struggling to do this even to this day.

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