Heat Transfer, Conduction, Convection, Radiation and Microwave Cooking

Posted by PITHOCRATES - September 4th, 2013

Technology 101

At the Atomic Level Vibrating Atoms create Heat

We make life comfortable and livable by transferring heat.  And by preventing the transfer of heat.  In fact, once we discovered how to make fire our understanding of heat transfer began and led to the modern life we know today.

At the atomic level heat is energy.  Vibrating atoms.  With electrons swirling around and jumping from one atom to another.  The more these atoms do this the hotter something is.  There is little atomic motion in ice.  And ice is very cold.  While there is a lot of motion in a pot of boiling water.  Which is why boiling water is very hot.

How do we get a pot of water to boil?  By transferring heat from a heat source.  A gas or electric burner.  This heat source is in contract with the pot.  The heat source agitates the atoms in the pot.  They begin to vibrate.  Causing the pot to heat up.  The water is in contact with the pot.  The agitated atoms in the pot agitate the atoms in the water.  Heating them up.  Giving us boiling water to cook with.  Or to make a winter’s day pleasant indoor.

Fin-Tube Heaters create a Rising Convection Current of Warm Air to Counter a Falling Cold Draft

If you touch a single-pane window in the winter in your house it feels very cold.  Cold outside air is in contact with the glass of the window.  Which slows the movement of the atoms.  Bringing the temperature down.  This cold temperature doesn’t conduct into the house.  The heat conducts out of the house.  Because there is no such thing as cold.  As cold is just the absence of heat.

The warm air inside the house comes in contact with the cold window.  Transferring heat from the air to the window.  The atoms in the air slow down.  The air cools down.  And falls.  This is the draft you feel at a closed window.  Cold air is heavier than warm air.  Which is why hot air rises.  And cold air falls.  As the cold air falls it pulls warmer air down in a draft.  Cooling it off.  Creating a convection current.

To keep buildings comfortable in the winter engineers design hot-water fin-tube heaters under each exterior window.  Gas burners heat up water piping inside a boiler.  The heat from the fire transfers heat to the boiler tubes.  Which transfers it to the water inside the tubes.  We then pump this heating hot water throughout the building.  As it enters a fin-tube heater under a window the hot water transfers heat to the heating hot water piping.  Attached to this piping are fins.  The heat transfers from the pipe to the fins.  Which heats the air in contact with these fins.  Hot air rises up and ‘washes’ the cold windows with warm air.  As it rises it pulls colder air up from the floor and through the heated fins.  Creating a convection current of warm air rising up to counter the falling cold draft.

Microwave Cooking won’t Sear Beef or Caramelize Onions like Conductive or Radiation Cooking

If you’ve ever waited for a ride outside an airport terminal on a cold winter’s day you’ve probably appreciated another type of heat transfer.  Radiation.  Outdoor curbside is open to the elements.  So you can’t heat the space.  Because there is no space.  Just a whole lot of outdoors.  But if you stand underneath a heater you feel toasty warm.  These are radiators.  A gas-fired or electric heating element that gets very, very hot.  So hot that energy radiates off of it.  Warming anything underneath it.  But if you step out from underneath you will feel cold.  It’s the same sitting around a campfire.  If you’re cold and wet you can sit by the fire and warm up in the fire’s radiation.  Move away from the fire, though, and you’re just cold and wet.

We use all these methods of heat transfer to cook our food.  Making life livable.  And enjoyable.  When we pan-fry we use conduction heating.  Transferring the heat from the burner to the pan to the food.  When we bake we use convection heating.  Transferring the heat from the burner to heat the air in the oven.  Which heats our food.  When we use the broiler we use radiation heating.  Using electric heating elements that glow red-hot, radiating energy into the food underneath them.  A convection oven adds a fan to an oven.  To blow heated air around our food.  Decreasing cooking time.

There’s one other cooking method.  One that is very common in many restaurants.  And in most homes.  But real chefs rarely use this method.  Microwaving.  With a microwave oven.  They’re great, convenient and fast but fine cooking isn’t about speed.  It’s about layering flavors and seasoning.  Which takes time.  Which you don’t get a lot of when a microwave begins vibrating the atoms in the water molecules in your food.   Which is how microwaves cook.  Cooking by vibrating atoms in your food brings temperatures up to serving temperatures.  Unlike conduction heating such as in pan-frying where we bring much higher temperatures into contact with our food.  Allowing us to sear beef and caramelize onions.  Something you can’t do in a microwave oven.  Which is why real chefs don’t use them.

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Flat-Bottomed Boat, Keel, Standing Rigging, Chinese Junk, Daggerboard, Balanced Rudder, Compartment and Junk Rig

Posted by PITHOCRATES - May 16th, 2012

Technology 101

Typical River Transport has a Flat Bottom and a Shallow Draft with Little Freeboard

What do most of the oldest and greatest cities in the world have in common?  Madrid.  Lisbon.  Paris.  London.  Amsterdam.  Belgrade.  Vienna.  Rome.  Cairo.  Kiev.  Moscow.  Baghdad.  New Delhi.  Shanghai.  Ho Chi Minh City.  Bangkok.  Hong Kong.  São Paul.  Buenos Aires.  Santiago.  Quebec City.  Montreal.  Detroit.  Boston.  New York.  Philadelphia.  Pittsburgh.  What do these cities have in common?  Rivers.  Coastal water.  Or safe harbors on the oceans.

Why is this?  Is it because their founders liked a good view?  That’s why people today pay a premium to live on the water’s edge.  But back then it was more necessity than view.  These were times before railroads.  Even before roads connected these new cities.  Back then there was only one way to transport things.  On the water.  And rivers were the early highways that connected the cities.  Which is why we built our cities on these rivers.  To transport the food or raw materials a city produced.  And to transport to these cities the things they needed to survive and grow.  And some of the earliest river transports were flat-bottomed boats.  Like the scow.  Punt.  Sampan.  And the barge.

Rivers are calm compared to the oceans.  Which allows a different boat design.  River transport doesn’t have to be sturdy to withstand rolling waves and high winds.  Which allows the design to focus on the main purpose of a boat.  Hauling freight.  Typical river transport has a flat bottom.  A shallow draft with little freeboard (i.e., sitting very low in the water with the top deck very close to the surface of the water).  And a square bow.  This allows these boats to operate in shallow waters.  Allowing them to run up right onto a river landing or beach.  Where they can be easily loaded with their cargoes.  Or unloaded.  And their flat, rectangular shapes maximize the cargo they can carry.  Propulsion is simple.  A man can push a small boat along with a pole.  Animal power can pull larger barges.  Or, later, motors were able to power them.  Or a tugboat could pull or push them.

The Chinese Junk had a Flat Bottom with no Keel allowing them to Carry a Lot of Cargo

These flat-bottomed boats are great for hauling freight.  But they are not very seaworthy.  Because the ocean’s waves will toss around any boat with a shallow draft and little freeboard.  Breaking it up and sending it and its cargo to the bottom of the ocean.  Which has confined these to the calm of rivers, bays and coastal waterways.  Cargoes that have to travel further than these allow are loaded onto an ocean-going vessel with a deeper draft.  And a higher freeboard.  With a keel.  That can withstand the leeward force of the wind.  So instead of being pushed sideways (or simply rolling over) the keel allows those sideway winds to fill a sail and propel a ship forward.  By sticking deeper into the water.  So as the wind tries to push the boat sideways the large amount of water in contact with the keel pushes back against that leeward force.  Allowing it to sail across the wind.

But there is a tradeoff.  The curved sections of the hull that form the keel reduces the amount of cargo a ship can carry in its hull.  Also, these ocean-going vessels have a lot of sail.  And a lot of rigging to hold it in place.  Standing rigging.  While the sails required running rigging.  To raise and lower sails depending on the wind conditions.  Which takes up space that can’t be used for cargo.  And requires a lot of sailors.  In fact, much of the upper deck is full of rigging and sailors instead of cargo.  But this was the tradeoff to sail into the rougher waters of the ocean.  You had to sacrifice revenue-earning cargo.  But there was one ship design that brought together the benefits of the flat-bottomed river scow and the ocean-going fully rigged sailing ship.  The Chinese junk.

The Chinese junk dates as far back as the 3rd century BC.  And began crossing oceans as early as the second century AD.  Long before the Europeans ventured out in their Age of Discovery.  The junk has a flat bottom with no keel.  But a high freeboard.  Which lets it carry a lot of cargo.  And operate in shallower waters than a fully rigged sailing ship.  But it could also sail in the rougher seas of the ocean.  When it did it lowered a daggerboard.  A centerboard that can lower from a watertight trunk within the hull into the water to act like a keel.  To resist those leeward forces.  Often installed forward in the hull so as not to take up valuable cargo space in the center of the ship.  Because they mount this forward the leeward forces could cause the back end of the ship to torque around the daggerboard. To counteract this force they use an oversized rudder on the stern.  To balance the resistance to those leeward forces.  Because the rudder was so large and had to deflect a lot of water it was difficult to turn.  Taking a team of men to operate it.   To help turn such a large rudder they developed ‘powered’ steering.  With a balanced rudder.  The axis the rudder turned on was just behind the leading edge of the rudder.  So when they turned the rudder the water hitting the part in front of the turning axis helped turn the rudder in the direction the crew was trying to turn it.  So the large rudder area past the turning axis could deflect the large volume of water necessary to turn the ship.

The Chinese gave us Papermaking, Printing, the Compass and Gunpowder but the Europeans Conquered the World

So the junk could travel in the shallow waters of harbors and rivers.  And the deep water of the ocean.  It was the first ship to compartmentalize the hull.  Making it very seaworthy.  Especially if it struck bottom and punched a hole in the hull.  Because of the compartments the flooding was contained to the one compartment.  Allowing the ship to remain afloat.  A design all ships use today.  The junk also used a different sailing rig.  The junk rig.  It’s low tech.  Was inexpensive.  And required smaller crews.

A three-mast junk has three masts.  And three sails.  One sail per mast.  And the masts are free standing.  They don’t need any standing rigging to hold them in place.  Because they don’t carry heavy loads of running rigging and sailors.  The sail is stretched between a yard and a boom.  The yard is at the top.  The boom is along the bottom.  Between the yard and the boom battens give the sail strength and attach it to the mast.  Think of a batten as that stick in the bottom of a window shade.  Grabbing this batten allows you to apply an even force on that window shade when pulling it down.  If this stick wasn’t there and you pulled down on the window shade the uneven forces across the shade would tear it.  Same principle on a junk rig.  Which allows them to use less expensive sail material.  To raise this sail up the mast you pulled up the yard via a block and tackle at the top of the mast.  From the deck.  With fewer crew members.  The sail is attached to the mast near one edge.  It’s pivoted to catch and redirect wind to the stern.  Propelling the ship forward.  And the battens will bend in strong enough winds to curve the sail.  Creating lift on the other side of the sail to pull the ship forward.

The Chinese gave us papermaking, printing, the compass and gunpowder.  But it was the Europeans that used these inventions to conquer the world.  For the Chinese had no interest in civilizations outside of China.  For when you had the best, they thought, what was the point?  So the Europeans came to them.  Even took Hong Kong from them.  When it was the Chinese that could have had the technologically advanced civilization.  An army fielding muskets and cannon.  And a navy of junk warships that could have gone anywhere the Europeans could have gone.  And farther.  Into the shallow waters and up the rivers where the European warships could not go.  They could have sailed up the Thames to London.  Up the Seine to Paris.  Even into Amsterdam.  Home of the Dutch East India Company.  That took such a great interest in all those Asian goods in the first place.   That brought the British to China to compete against the Dutch.  Leading to the Opium Wars.  And the loss of Hong Kong.  Imagine how different the world would be had China embraced their technology.  Like they are today.  Perhaps we will soon see the answer to that great ‘what if’ question.

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