FUNDAMENTAL TRUTH #56: “It’s competition in the private sector that makes life better. Not government regulation.” -Old Pithy

Posted by PITHOCRATES - March 8th, 2011

Government caused the Greatest Recession since the Great Depression

You hear it all the time from the Left.  If it wasn’t for all those government regulations those on the Right bitch about we wouldn’t have safe food, safe medication, safe transportation, safe merchandise, fair prices, a clean environment, quality education, etc.  It’s rather amazing to hear people in government say this.  And people on the Left say this.  Because people are people.  And people regulate people.  So why are some people better than other people?  Just because they say they are?  I find that a bit specious.

Government caused the greatest recession since the Great Depression.  It was their economic policies that put people into houses they couldn’t afford.  It was Government Sponsored Enterprises (GSEs) Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac that enabled the approval of very risky mortgages by buying them from the lenders.  It was the GSEs that had Wall Street create vehicles to sell these risky mortgages as high yield, low risk investments (i.e., derivatives).  It was Congress that refused to stop this risky behavior of the GSEs because Congress members were getting sweetheart mortgage deals and campaign contributions.  And it was Congress that bailed out the GSEs with our tax dollars after their dirty politics crashed the economy.  If you go down the chain of events you see one constant behind every step in the process that gave us the Great Recession.  Government, government, government.  And yet we are to trust government people every time over the private sector people.

If you remove government from the mortgage picture, though, it’s a different story.  Instead of discrimination it was just poor credit and insufficient earnings that denied mortgages for some blacks, Hispanics, single mothers, etc.  And these people wouldn’t have been in houses they couldn’t afford.  Lenders would have had far fewer risky mortgages on their books.  The GSEs would have bought far fewer risky mortgages.   Wall Street wouldn’t have spread the subprime mortgage contagion worldwide by selling boatloads of their complex derivatives.  There would have been no Great Recession.  There would be no double digit unemployment (U6 – a truer unemployment rate than the ‘official’ U3) today.  And all of this by just removing government from the beginning of this process.  And yet we are to trust government people every time over the private sector people.

A Business must please the Consumer to Survive

Let’s look at another example.  Let’s take food.  The Left say that if it wasn’t government regulation our food would be unsafe.  So let’s imagine a world where there is no government regulation.  And only two meat packing plants.  A devious, archetypical corporate villain (as the Left believes runs all corporations) runs one plant.  Let’s call him Mr. Devious.  A true free market capitalist runs the other.  Mr. Devious reinvests no money into the plant.  Doesn’t even clean it.  Has a rat infestation.  Uses rat poison to control the rat infestation.  Doesn’t care.  And sends out tainted meat that kills hundreds of people.  The true free market capitalist keeps reinvesting in his plant.  Keeps it clean.  Has no rat infestation.  And strives to put out the best quality product.  It’s not tainted and people eat it without dying.

Now suppose you’re putting together your shopping list.  You have meat on your list.  And on the television news is a story about still more deaths that are traced back to Mr. Devious’ plant.  Now, in our imaginary world, there is no government.  No government inspectors to step in to inspect Mr. Devious’ plant.  He broke no law and did not fail to maintain any regulatory standards.  No one files any legal actions against Mr. Devious because he broke no law.  Now tell me, where are you going to go to buy your meat?  Well, if you’re sane, you’re going to make damn sure the meat you buy didn’t come from Mr. Devious’ plant. 

Even in a world that has no government regulation, a Mr. Devious cannot exist.  Because there’s competition.  And the last thing a true free market capitalist wants is bad publicity.  If consumers have an unfavorable view of your company they’ll shop elsewhere.  And if you’re killing people with the food you sell, you couldn’t make a more unfavorable view of your company in the eyes of consumers.  So they won’t be buying what you’re selling.  Ever.  But guess where they will be buying from?  That’s right.  The business that puts out the best quality.  And the best price, of course.  In other words, the one that best pleases the consumer.

Competition Makes Everything Better

Hey, you’re thinking, that makes sense.  So maybe the big corporate giants care about us.  If only for their greed.  Well, greed is a powerful motivator.  You see, a profit is an incentive to do good.  And pleasing consumers it the key to profitability.  So you do everything within your power to please as many consumers as possible.  Before another business pleases them better.  We call this tug of war in the market place competition.  And you win this game by pleasing consumers better than your competitors do.  Because competition makes everything better.

Now think about the things you hate to do.  Deal with the cable company.  A utility.  Getting your driver’s license renewed.  Getting a building permit.  Getting your tax assessment reduced because your house isn’t worth as much as your city says it is.  Filling out your income taxes.  Going through airport security.  Etc.  And what do all of these things have in common?  Little to no competition (although cable companies have competition today but making a change is a pain in the you know what).  There is little need to please consumers.  And it shows.  Customer service isn’t the greatest.  And the processes are often long, complex and exasperating.  Why?  Because they can be.  Where else are we going to go?

These things also have another thing in common.  Government heavily regulates them.  Or they’re simply government itself.  Government people.  Those people we are always to side with over the private sector.  And many of us do.  Despite our not liking to do any of the things we have to do with them.

Competition can even Clean the Environment

Okay, but what about the environment?  There’s no profit in spending more money to keep the environment clean.  Surely that’s something only government regulation can do.  Well, let me ask you something.  Where are you more likely to litter?  In your backyard?  Or in the National Mall after a rally?  The National Mall, yes?  Because we take care of what we own. 

Yes, there have been polluters in the past.  And, yes, government regulations have cleaned them up.  But back when they were polluting, few cared.  Because it was normal.  I mean, once upon a time, human feces used to cover our sidewalks and streets.  And that was normal.  It isn’t anymore.  So we don’t do it anymore.  This is more a process of civilization.  A company today that leeches toxic chemicals into the ground water that kills people who drink well water is going to get a lot of bad PR (public relations, i.e., favorable publicity).  And we know what bad PR does to private companies.  So they are going to try everything in their power to not leech toxic chemicals into the ground water so they can avoid the bad PR.  Before we knew the affect of some of these chemicals, though, some companies did unknowingly kill people.  Now that we know better, they handle their chemicals differently.  In a way that will help to keep consumers as customers.  Not push them away.

BP and Exxon both suffered in the eyes of the consumer after their spills.  And a lot of consumers refused to buy their gasoline anymore.  Not only that, the BP spill shut down all offshore oil drilling in US waters.   At great cost millions of dollars of equipment had to be shipped elsewhere where they could drill.  They would have made more profits without the spill and the bad PR.  So they have a very strong incentive to prevent these environmental disasters from happening.  And considering the amount of oil they pump up from these offshore wells, their environmental record is pretty good.

Companies even look at the little things that add up.  McDonalds used to sell their hamburgers in hard, foam cartons.  They don’t anymore.  Because they felt they could please more consumers by being more environmentally friendly.  Starbucks sells their hot coffee in paper cups to be environmentally friendly.  And the sleeves they use so you can hold those hot cups of coffee contain recycled material.  You can still use foam cups by law.  But they choose not to.  To please their consumers.  So they can keep them as customers.  And be more profitable.

Without Competition Little Changes

Corporations survive on profits.  Maintaining profitability means pleasing consumers.  When something bad happens they have a powerful incentive to act fast.  Before the problem spirals out of control causing bad PR.  Making consumers go elsewhere.  They will act faster than any government bureaucracy in identifying and correcting the problem.  To limit their damages.  Because the more damage they cause the harder it will be to regain the consumers’ confidence.  And lost consumer confidence equals fewer profits in the private sector.

It’s a little different with government.  Without competition little changes.  Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are still here.  They may go away but there is talk about replacing them with something similar.  To make sure the same housing policies that caused the Great Recession will continue.  To make sure that some people who can’t afford a house can buy a house.  And if it all blows up again, they will just pass the cost onto the taxpayers.  Again.

And yet we are to trust government people every time over the private sector people.

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Asset Bubbles and Deflationary Spirals in Japan, the United States and China

Posted by PITHOCRATES - December 25th, 2010

The Japanese Asset Bubble and their Lost Decade

During the eighties the Japanese government worked with Japanese business.  And the eighties in Japan were booming.  The Japanese went on an American buying spree.  They gobbled up American landmark buildings and business.  It was an economic Pearl Harbor.  Some people wringed their hands in distress, fearing the Japanese ascendancy.  Presidential candidates said we were fools for not following the Japanese model.

Easy money created excess liquidity.  Which created inflationary pressure on prices.  Real estate values soared.  And irrational exuberance bid up prices further, creating an asset bubble.  Times were good while they lasted.  But the bubble popped.  Real estate values tumbled.  And the Japanese suffered a deflationary spiral that would last a decade.  They call their 1990s the ‘lost decade’.  They still haven’t fully recovered.  And this was a direct consequence of government working with business.

The Subprime Mortgage Crisis and the Beginning of our Lost Decade

Totally ignoring the lessons of the Japanese, the Americans went down the same road.  Easy money created excess liquidity.  And like in Japan, this created inflationary pressure on prices.  And like the Japanese, real estate values soared.  Alan Greenspan warned us about our irrational exuberance.  But we didn’t listen.  We bid prices higher still.  Created the mother of all asset bubbles.  Times were good in the 1990s.  But the bubble popped.  As history has shown bubbles to do.  And real estate values tumbled.  But with a twist.

In America, government pressured bankers to approve mortgages for people who couldn’t qualify for a mortgage.  So bankers had to come up with some creative ways to make the unqualified qualified.  The weapon of choice was the subprime mortgage.  And everything worked as plan.  Until interest rates went up.  And then the whole deck of cards came crashing down. 

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (government sponsored enterprises) guaranteed those risky loans.  Then, to encourage bankers to make more of these risky loans, they bought them from the banks.  They chopped them up and created investment instruments.  We called them derivatives.  High yield (because of the ‘subprime’ in subprime mortgage).  And safe (because of the ‘mortgage’ in subprime mortgage).  So when interest rates rose and the unqualified couldn’t pay their mortgage payments anymore, we got the subprime mortgage crisis that reverberated throughout the world thanks to those derivatives.  All because government worked with business.

The Chinese are Working on an Asset Bubble of their Own

In the 2000s, it’s the Chinese that everyone fears.  Economically speaking.  (For now at least.)  Over the past decade or two, China has become more capitalistic than communist.  It’s not pure capitalism.  It’s more government partnering with business.  Sort of a throwback to mercantilism.  They have tariffs and monetary policies to protect their domestic industries.  And they subsidize their export industries in an export-driven economy.  And it’s been working.  So far.

It worked in Japan for awhile.  But we saw what happened there.  It worked in the United States for awhile.  But we saw what happened there.  Government partnering with business has, historically, been a train wreck.  Now China is trying her hand.  Will history repeat itself there?  Perhaps (see China Raises Interest Rates Again to Cool Inflation by Edward Wong posted 12/25/2010 on The New York Times).

China’s central bank announced on Saturday that it was raising interest rates for the second time in about two months in what appears to be a long-term campaign to suppress inflation as many ordinary Chinese express discontent with rising consumer prices.

Oh my.  Inflationary pressures are raising prices.  And to tamp those prices back down, they raised interest rates.  This is giving me a strange feeling of déjà vu.    

The Chinese economy has been awash in liquidity due to government stimulus money and generous lending by state banks. Chinese officials are now concerned about an overheated economy and the inflationary pressures that come with that.

Awash in liquidity?  Government stimulus money?  Generous state bank lending?  It feels like we went through this before.  Odd.  This feeling of déjà vu.

But investment in large capital-intensive projects has also been fueling the economic engine and driving up prices.

Capital-intensive projects?  That requires financing.  Lots of it.  Lots of bank loans.  Lots of liquidity.  And a lot of liability on bank’s balance sheets.  Shouldn’t be a problem.  As long as those are safe loans.  Backed by safe assets.  Just like in the United States.  Before we started putting people into houses who couldn’t afford to buy a house.

Officials have signaled throughout the month that moves will be taken to better control spending across the country. China announced on Dec. 3 that it would tighten monetary policy next year, shifting it from “relatively loose to prudent.” That was a clear sign that Chinese officials were intensely concerned about inflation.

The Chinese get a little Alan Greenspan.  They’re getting a little nervous about their irrational exuberance.

The property market in China has been booming. Rising property prices, along with the government stimulus money and loose bank lending, have spurred new developments across the country. Even long-term residents on the tropical southern island of Hainan have had to grapple with soaring real estate prices from outsiders coming in to buy up land.

Some analysts say this growth has resulted in a gargantuan bubble in the real estate market, while others argue that the capacity will be put to good use.

And for good reason.  Real estate bubbles aren’t good.  Things can get really ugly when they burst.  If you doubt me, ask the Japanese.  Or the Americans.

Until now, low wages have helped to hold down inflation and keep China’s export industry competitive. But those wages in the context of soaring real estate prices mean that migrant workers from the interior of China are becoming less tolerant of poor work conditions on the coasts, where many of China’s export manufacturing factories are located. Many workers are now choosing to stay closer to home in the interior provinces, and some companies are moving their manufacturing centers inland.

They took our jobs.  But now they don’t want them.  Those people who worked dirt cheap (by our standards, not theirs) have learned from the West.  They want more.  And, in a booming economy, they probably have choices out there.  It could add huge inflationary pressures on wages.  Or force a government crackdown on individual liberty.  Neither will probably be good for the economy.  Or those balance sheets.  At the banks financing those capital-intensive projects.

History Repeats – Ignore her at your Own Risk

One thing history shows us over and over is that free markets work.  Managed markets don’t.  Government partnering with business doesn’t work.  It didn’t work for the Japanese.  And it didn’t work for the United States.  When you intervene into market forces you disrupt market forces.  And often have unintended consequences.  Such as runaway inflation.  Asset bubbles.  And deflationary spirals.

The Japanese lost a decade.  The United States is looking like they will lose a decade.  Will the Chinese be next?  If history repeats, as history has a penchant for doing, they may be the next to lose a decade.  Of course, that could be a bit of a problem for us.  They hold a lot of our debt.  And if they want their money back to save themselves, guess what that will do to us.  Suffice it to say that the historians will then be able to write about the rise and fall of the United States.

History can be such a bitch when we ignore her.

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Financial Crises: The Fed Giveth and the Fed Taketh Away

Posted by PITHOCRATES - December 3rd, 2010

Great Depression vs. Great Recession

Ben Bernanke is a genius.  I guess.  That’s what they keep saying at least. 

The chairman of the Federal Reserve is a student of the Great Depression, that great lesson of how NOT to implement monetary policy.  And because of his knowledge of this past great Federal Reserve boondoggle, who better to fix the present great Federal Reserve boondoggle?  What we affectionately call the Great Recession.

There are similarities between the two.  Government caused both.  But there are differences.  Bad fiscal policy brought on a recession in the 1920s.  Then bad monetary policy exasperated the problem into the Great Depression. 

Bad monetary policy played a more prominent role in the present crisis.  It was a combination of cheap money and aggressive government policy to put people into houses they couldn’t afford that set off an international debt bomb.  Thanks to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac buying highly risky mortgages and selling them as ‘safe’ yet high-yield investments.  Those rascally things we call derivatives.

The Great Depression suffered massive bank failures because the lender of last resort (the Fed) didn’t lend.  In fact, they made it more difficult to borrow money when banks needed money most.  Why did they do this?  They thought rich people were using cheap money to invest in the stock market.  So they made money more expensive to borrow to prevent this ‘speculation’.

The Great Recession suffered massive bank failures because people took on great debt in ideal times (low interest rates and increasing home values).  When the ‘ideal’ became real (rising interest rates and falling home values), surprise surprise, these people couldn’t pay their mortgages anymore.  And all those derivatives became worthless. 

The Great Depression:  Lessons Learned.  And not Learned.

Warren G. Harding appointed Andrew Mellon as his Secretary of the Treasury.  A brilliant appointment.  The Harding administration cut taxes.  The economy surged.  Lesson learned?  Lower taxes stimulate the economy.  And brings more money into the treasury.

The Progressives in Washington, though, needed to buy votes.  So they tinkered.  They tried to protect American farmers from their own productivity.  And American manufacturers.  Also from their own productivity.  Their protectionist policies led to tariffs and an international trade war.  Lesson not learned?  When government tinkers bad things happen to the economy.

Then the Fed stepped in.  They saw economic activity.  And a weakening dollar (low interest rates were feeding the economic expansion).  So they strengthened the dollar.  To keep people from ‘speculating’ in the stock money with borrowed money.  And to meet international exchange rate requirements.  This led to bank failures and the Great Depression.  Lesson not learned?   When government tinkers bad things happen to the economy.

Easy Money Begets Bad Debt which Begets Financial Crisis

It would appear that Ben Bernanke et al learned only some of the lessons of the Great Depression.  In particular, the one about the Fed’s huge mistake in tightening the money supply.  No.  They would never do that again.  Next time, they would open the flood gates (see Fed aid in financial crisis went beyond U.S. banks to industry, foreign firms by Jia Lynn Yang, Neil Irwin and David S. Hilzenrath posted 12/2/2010 on The Washington Post).

The financial crisis stretched even farther across the economy than many had realized, as new disclosures show the Federal Reserve rushed trillions of dollars in emergency aid not just to Wall Street but also to motorcycle makers, telecom firms and foreign-owned banks in 2008 and 2009.

The Fed’s efforts to prop up the financial sector reached across a broad spectrum of the economy, benefiting stalwarts of American industry including General Electric and Caterpillar and household-name companies such as Verizon, Harley-Davidson and Toyota. The central bank’s aid programs also supported U.S. subsidiaries of banks based in East Asia, Europe and Canada while rescuing money-market mutual funds held by millions of Americans.

The Fed learned its lesson.  Their easy money gave us all that bad debt.  And we all learned just how bad ‘bad debt’ can be.  They wouldn’t make that mistake again.

The data also demonstrate how the Fed, in its scramble to keep the financial system afloat, eventually lowered its standards for the kind of collateral it allowed participating banks to post. From Citigroup, for instance, it accepted $156 million in triple-C collateral or lower – grades that indicate that the assets carried the greatest risk of default.

Well, maybe next time.

You Don’t Stop a Run by Starting a Run

With the cat out of the bag, people want to know who got these loans.  And how much each got.  But the Fed is not telling (see Fed ID’s companies that used crisis aid programs by Jeannine Aversa, AP Economics Writer, posted 12/1/2010 on Yahoo! News).

The Fed didn’t take part in that appeal. What the court case could require — but the Fed isn’t providing Wednesday — are the names of commercial banks that got low-cost emergency loans from the Fed’s “discount window” during the crisis.

The Fed has long acted as a lender of last resort, offering commercial banks loans through its discount window when they couldn’t obtain financing elsewhere. The Fed has kept secret the identities of such borrowers. It’s expressed fear that naming such a bank could cause a run on it, defeating the purpose of the program.

I can’t argue with that.  For this was an important lesson of the Great Depression.  When you’re trying to stop bank runs, you don’t advertise which banks are having financial problems.  A bank can survive a run.  If everyone doesn’t try to withdraw their money at the same time.  Which they may if the Fed advertises that a bank is going through difficult times.

When Fiscal Responsibility Fails, Try Extortion

Why does government always tinker and get themselves into trouble?  Because they like to spend money.  And control things.  No matter what the lessons of history have taught us.

Cutting taxes stimulate the economy.  But it doesn’t buy votes.  You need people to be dependent on government for that.  So no matter what mess government makes, they NEVER fix their mess by shrinking government or cutting taxes.  Even at the city level. 

When over budget what does a city do?  Why, they go to a favored tactic.  Threaten our personal safety (see Camden City Council Approves Massive Police And Fire Layoffs Reported by David Madden, KYW Newsradio 1060, posted 12/2/2010 on philadelphia.cbslocal.com).

Camden City Council, as expected, voted Thursday to lay off almost 400 workers, half of them police officers and firefighters, to bridge a $26.5 million deficit.

There’s a word for this.  And it’s not fiscal responsibility.  Some would call it extortion.

It’s never the pay and benefits of the other city workers.  It’s always the cops and firefighters.  Why?  Because cutting the pay and benefits of a bloated bureaucracy doesn’t put the fear of God into anyone.

Here we go Again

We never learn.  And you know what George Santayana said.  “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”  And here we are.  Living in the past.  Again.

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LESSONS LEARNED #35: “Not only is ignorance bliss, but it’s a godsend to Big Government.” -Old Pithy

Posted by PITHOCRATES - October 14th, 2010

If Jefferson Could Talk from the Grave He’d Be Hoarse from Shouting by Now

Politicians.  They’re all the same.  Well, most of them.  They enter politics for one thing.  For a career.  And what do people want from a career?  Great success.  Great prestige.  Great wealth.  Great power.  And a little revenge.  The pencil-neck, computer-nerd geek takes great pleasure in seeing a jock from his high school days emptying his trash while boarding his private jet. “Those wedgies and swirlies were a bitch but look at us now.”  It’s true.  The best revenge is living well.

But some people lack any talent or ability.  Some of them will never amount to anything.  They’ll never know the joy of looking down on people better than them with sweet condescension.  So these people go into politics.  Where people with no talent or ability can live well.  It’s a simple formula.  Sell your soul.  Whore yourself out.  Shake down businesses with taxation and regulation (and get even with all those people who have far more talent and ability than you ever had).  Collect tribute.  Consolidate power.  Hold those you serve in contempt.

Lord Acton wrote in 1887, “Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.”  A century earlier, Thomas Jefferson fought tirelessly to prevent great money and federal power from conjoining.  The Old World capitals consolidated money and power.  And this concentrated the money and power into fewer and fewer hands.  Kings ruled by whim.  And oppressed their hapless subjects.  It’s a story as old as time.  And is still true today.  To the great chagrin of Jefferson.

Go West, Young Man

The transcontinental railroad was making poor progress during the Civil War.  Because it was starved for capital.  No one would invest.  Few doubted that they could build it.  Even if they could, few doubted it would ever make money.  The West was mostly raw, unsettled land.  There was nothing to transport.  Nothing to earn revenue.  It was a huge investment with a huge risk.  Investors are smart when it comes to money.  And they saw the transcontinental railroad as a one-way road that their money would go down and never return.  They needed something.  Big Government.

When it comes to throwing money away on a losing investment there is but one place to go.  Uncle Sam.  With the power to tax, the federal government has huge piles of money to play with.  So here’s what happened to build that railroad.  Union Pacific (UP) created a shell company called Crédit Mobilier (CM) to finance and build the railroad.  These companies were one and the same.  Without getting too complicated, UP sold their ‘worthless’ stock to CM at par.  Now, CM being a finance and construction company, a train never had to run over the road they were building to make a profit.  Union Pacific, on the other hand, needed trains running on that new track.  They were a transportation company.  They earned a profit from transporting goods on their trains.  This meant it could take years before UP could even hope to earn a profit on the new transcontinental railroad.  CM, on the other hand, could start earning a profit with the first invoice they submitted for construction.  And they did.

CM had strong revenues.  They submitted grossly inflated construction invoices to UP.  UP added a small construction management fee and submitted them to the government.  The government paid UP.  UP paid CM.  With revenues far exceeding their costs, CM made obscene profits.  CM stock took off into the stratosphere.  Some of which was sold to Congressmen at a deep discount who in turn realized obscene capital gains if they sold their stock.  Or collected obscene dividends if they held onto their stock.  In return for this sweetheart deal, they approved all cost overruns.  Killed any legislation unfavorable to UP/CM.  Provided lucrative incentives to build track on the worst ground in the most indirect path (to maximize the railroad’s mineral rights).  Provided little to no oversight on the construction of the road (some track was built on ice, with cheap steel and flimsy wooden trestles wherever possible).  When east met west the different railroads kept on building, parallel to each other to keep billing Uncle Sam.  All paid by the public treasury.  By the taxpayer.  The little guy.  Being raped and pillaged by their own representatives.

Affordable Housing for Those Who Vote Democrat

Politicians buy votes.  Pad the federal payroll.  Steal from the treasury.  Break the law.  Violate our trust.  You know, politician stuff.  Because of the inconvenience of elections, they can’t be too blatant about their rape and pillage.  So they do things that are in the best interest of the public.  Or so they say.  Like affordable housing.  You see, the Left buys the votes of the poor and minorities by throwing bones to them.  And there are a lot of minorities in the inner cities of the bluest of blue cities.  So they threw big bones to them.  Houses.

Despite their War on Poverty, the Left just can’t help these people.  The truth is, of course, that they don’t want to help them.  If they’re poor and dependent on the government, the Left can count on their vote.  If they escape poverty and don’t need Big Government to provide for them, these people are of no use to the Left.  Ergo, they never escape poverty.

Of course, the problem of remaining in abject poverty is that you can’t qualify for a mortgage.  Banks are funny that way.  They only loan money to people who can pay them back.  So they declined a lot of mortgages to these poor inner city minorities.  Well, this was just too good for Big Government to pass up.  A large group of minorities (i.e., a large Democrat voting bloc) being denied mortgages?  Why, that’s racism.  So they drafted a lot of legislation and unleashed their justice department with extreme prejudice.  The message?  Approve these loans.  Or face the consequences (revoking a bank’s charter, a federal lawsuit, a public demonstration headed by Jesse Jackson, Charlie Rangel, et al, etc.).  So they found creative ways to approve loans.  And they got a little help from Uncle Sam.

The Subprime Mortgage Crisis is a Lot Like the Crédit Mobilier Scandal

By a little I mean a lot.  Uncle Sam screwed the mortgage bankers by making them approve extremely risky loans.  So, to help the mortgage bankers, Uncle Sam screwed the American people.  They guaranteed those highly risky mortgages, thus transferring the risk from them to us, the taxpayer.  And to further mitigate the bankers’ risks, they purchased a lot of those highly risky mortgages to remove them from the banks’ balance sheets.  It’s called the secondary mortgage market.  And the primary players are none other than Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, ground zero of the subprime mortgage crisis.

Once upon a time, a mortgage was one of the safest investments.  People saved up to pay a 20% down payment.  With their life savings invested, people paid their mortgage payment and they paid them on time.  And if you could afford a 20% down payment, mortgage bankers had a lot of confidence that you would be able to service your mortgage.  But in the day of 5%, 3% and 0% down, a person doesn’t have a whole lot to lose.  This makes the first few years of these mortgages especially risky.  The introduction of ‘no documentation’ mortgages meant people could lie about their income (or include overtime earnings).  Add to that the Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) and the interest-only mortgage and you just made these especially risky mortgages even more risky.  Sure, these will get almost anyone into a home, but they get in by the skin of their teeth.  But if they lose their overtime due to a weakened economy, if their interest rate on their ARM resets at a higher rate or a balloon payment is due on their interest-only loan, guess what?  That stream of mortgage payments could very well stop.

Now that would be a BIG problem.  Because of what Freddie and Fannie did with those mortgages they bought.  They sliced them up and built creative investment vehicles.  Derivatives.  Mortgage backed securities called collateralized debt obligations.  Wall Street repackaged all these risky mortgages into highly profitable investments.  Everybody bought them.  Pension funds.  Trust funds.  In America.  And throughout the world.  Big gains with a low risk.  Or so it would seem.  You see, they never eliminated the risk.  They only transferred it to someone else.  And once people couldn’t pay their mortgage payments anymore, the house of cards came crashing down.  We call it the subprime mortgage crisis of 2008.  It caused a worldwide recession.  And cost the American taxpayer dearly.  Even those not born yet.

Yes We Can…Screw the American Taxpayer

The subprime mortgage crisis of 2008 is a government creation.  Their quest of affordable housing to buy votes put more and more people into houses they couldn’t afford.  They created legislation akin to extortion of the banking industry.  They used the Justice Department to apply the muscle for that extortion.  They had their friends in the media and the activists for racial equality to further pressure the banking industry.  Their lack of oversight of Fannie and Freddie (thank you Barney Frank and Chris Dodd) let them make extremely risky loans.  And their policies of buying extremely risky mortgages ultimately transferred all risk to the taxpayer.  Why?  Because like all good government scandals, the seekers of favors rewarded our representatives well for their complicity with sweetheart mortgage deals, vacation junkets, fat contributions to their campaign war chests, etc.  In other words, politics as usual.  But on a grand scale.

Why do they do it?  Because they can.  They count on you being ignorant of history.  And accepting every lie they tell you.  Because they hold you in contempt.  They look down on you with sweet condescension.  These pencil-neck geeks who could never amount to anything on their own merit or ability.  But some sold souls later and they have finally gotten even with those who were better than them.  And here they are.  Still living well.  Even during the worst recession since the Great Depression.

www.PITHOCRATES.com

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