Girl sits on Phone in Back Pocket and starts Fire just as Damaged Batteries start Fires in Electric Cars

Posted by PITHOCRATES - February 2nd, 2014

Week in Review

Lithium-ion batteries are a wonder.  But they can be temperamental.  Which you can expect when you put highly reactive chemicals together.  Which is the price of higher energy storage densities.  Danger.  To make that charge last longer in the batteries powering our electronic devices.  And they can only do that by a chemical reaction that produces heat.  Boeing had a problem with their lithium-ion batteries that nearly caught a couple of their new Dreamliners on fire.  Resulting in an FAA grounding of the entire fleet until they found a way to make their batteries safer.  But it’s not just big lithium-ion batteries that can burst into flames (see iPhone catches fire, teen girl burned by Chris Matyszczyk posted 2/1/2014 on CNET).

An eighth-grader in Maine is sitting in class when she hears a pop. Then she notices smoke coming from her back pocket…

The culprit is said to have been her iPhone. Images suggest it had caught fire…

The division chief of the local emergency medical services, Andrew Palmeri, told Seacoast Online that the phone’s battery had “shorted out.” He suggested that the phone had been crushed in the teen’s back pocket. Local fire services are investigating…

Cell phones of whatever brand do catch fire. iPhones have caught fire on planes, just as Droids have exploded in ears.

So lithium-ion batteries can be dangerous.  Despite being the wonders they are.  For these chemical reactions are powerful.  And need to be confined perfectly.  But if you sit on a cell phone you can damage the confinement of those chemicals.  Causing a fire.  Just as accidents in electric cars have resulted in battery fires that have totaled these cars.  Or a faulty charging circuit started a fire overnight while charging in an attached garage.  Starting the house on fire.  Or nearly started a plane on fire.

The greatest hindrance to electric car sales is a thing called range anxiety.  Will I have enough charge to get home?  The answer to this problem is, of course, increasing the charge available in these cars.  Typically with bigger and more powerful batteries.  Which can burn the car to a crisp after an accident damages the battery.  Or debris on the roadway is thrown up by a tire into the battery.  Things that won’t total a gasoline-powered car if they happen.  Because gas is a high-density energy source.  Like these lithium-ion batters.  But it takes a lot more abuse to the gas tank to get it to start a fire.  Which is why electric cars will not replace the gasoline-powered car.  As they provide a far greater range and are safer.  And until the electric car can out do the gasoline-powered car on these two points the electric car will remain a novelty.

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Lead–Acid Battery, Nickel–Cadmium Battery (NiCd), Nickel–Metal Hydride Battery (NiMH) and Lithium-Ion Battery

Posted by PITHOCRATES - January 9th, 2013

Technology 101

The Chemical Reactions in a Zinc-Carbon Battery are One Way

A battery uses chemistry to make electricity.  An electric current is a flow of electrons that can do useful work.  The chemical reaction inside a battery creates that flow of electrons to produce an electric current.  In a common zinc-carbon battery, for example, a zinc electrode dissolves in an electrolyte.  As it does atoms release free electrons and become positive ions (cations) in the electrolyte.  Giving this solution a positive charge.  At the same time a carbon electrode is in a different electrolyte solution.  One filled with negative ions (anions).  Giving this solution a negative charge.

With no electrical load attached to the battery these electrodes and electrolytes are in equilibrium.  When we attach an external circuit across the battery terminals they provide a pathway for those free electrons.  As the free electrons travel through the external circuit the cations and anions travel through a porous membrane from one electrolyte to the other.  The positive cations (atoms with room for an additional electron) flow towards the carbon electrode.  And combine with the free electrons on the surface of the carbon electrode and become electrically neutral.

We can stop this chemical reaction.  Say by turning a flashlight or a portable radio off.  But we can’t reverse it.  This is a one-way chemical reaction that eventually dissolves away the anode.  A Zinc-carbon battery is inexpensive.  The amount of battery life we get out of it more than offsets the price.  And they’re easy to change.  But sometimes an application calls for a battery that isn’t easy to change.  Like a car battery.  Imagine having to change that a few times a year when it ran down.  No, that would be far too inconvenient.  Difficult.  And costly.  So we don’t.  Instead, we recharge car batteries.

The Chemical Reactions in a Lead-Acid Battery are Reversible allowing these batteries to be Recharged

A car battery is a lead-acid battery.  Each cell of a lead-acid battery has a positive electrode (i.e., plate) of lead dioxide.  A negative electrode of lead.  And an electrolyte of a sulfuric acid-water solution containing sulfate ions.  The lead chemically reacts with the sulfate ions to produce lead sulfate on the negative electrode while producing positive ions.  The lead dioxide chemically reacts with the sulfuric acid to produce lead sulfate on the positive electrode while giving up free electrons.

When we attach an external circuit to the battery (such as starting a car) the free electrons leave the positive electrode, travel through the external circuit and return to the battery.  Where they combine with those positive ions.  Lead sulfate forms on both electrodes.  These reactions consume the sulfuric acid in the electrolyte and leave mostly water behind.  Reducing the available charge in the battery.  But unlike zinc-carbon batteries these chemical reactions are reversible.  After a car starts, for example, the alternator provides the electric power needs of the car.  While applying a charging voltage to the battery.  This voltage will ionize the water in the battery which will break down the lead sulfate.  Deposit lead oxide back onto the positive electrode.  And deposit lead back onto the negative electrode.  Giving you a charged battery for the next time you need to start your engine.

A lead acid battery can provide a strong current to spin an internal combustion engine.  Which takes a lot of energy to fight the compression of the pistons.  And it can work in some very cold temperatures.  But it’s big and heavy.  And works best in things bigger and heavier.  Like cars.  Trucks.  Trains.  And ships.  But they don’t work well in things that are smaller and lighter.  Like cordless power tools.  Cell phones.  And laptop computers.  Things where battery weight is an important issue.  Requiring an alternative to the lead-acid battery.  One of the earliest rechargeable battery alternatives was the nickel–cadmium battery.  Or NiCad battery.

The Chemical Reactions produce Heat in a Lithium Ion Battery and can Catch Fire or Explode

The nickel–cadmium battery works like every other battery.  With chemical reactions that produce electrons.  And chemical reactions that consumes electrons.  The NiCad battery uses nickel (III) oxide-hydroxide for the positive electrode.  Cadmium for the negative electrode.  And potassium hydroxide as the electrolyte.  A NiCad battery may look like a zinc-carbon battery.  But the electrodes are different.  Instead of the zinc canister and a carbon rod the electrodes in a NiCad battery are long strips.  One is placed onto the other with a separator in between.  Then rolled up like a jelly-roll.

NiCad batteries have a memory effect.  If they were recharged without being fully discharged the battery ‘remembers’ the amount of charge it took to recharge the partially discharged battery.  So even if you fully discharged the battery it would only recharge it as if you partially discharged it.  Reducing the battery capacity over time.  The nickel–metal hydride battery (NiMH) eliminated this problem.  And improved on the NiCad.  Giving it 2-3 times the capacity of a NiCad battery.  NiCad and NiMH batteries are very similar.  They use the same positive electrode.  But instead of the highly toxic cadmium NiMH batteries use a mixture of a rare earth metal mixed with another metal.

Today battery technology has evolved into the lithium-ion battery.  Where the positive electrode is a compound containing lithium.  The negative electrode is typically graphite.  The electrolyte is a lithium salt.  Lithium ions travel between the electrodes through the electrolyte.  And electrons flow between the electrodes via the external circuit.  They have a greater capacity, no memory effect and hold their charge for a long time when not being used.  Making the lithium ion battery ideal for cell phones and other consumer electronics.  These chemical reactions produce heat, though.  And can catch fire or explode.  Trying to prevent this from happening increases their manufacturing costs, making them expensive batteries.  So expensive that people will buy cheaper generic brands.  Cheaper because they are not built to the same quality standards of the more expensive ones.  And are more prone to catching fire or exploding.

Something to think about when you feel the heat of your cell phone after a long conversation.  Only use a battery recommended by the manufacturer.  Even if it costs a small fortune.  It may be expensive.  But probably not as expensive as your monthly airtime charges.  So don’t skimp when it comes to lithium ion batteries.  For those cheap ones do have a tendency to catch fire.  Or explode.

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