Flat-Bottomed Boat, Keel, Standing Rigging, Chinese Junk, Daggerboard, Balanced Rudder, Compartment and Junk Rig

Posted by PITHOCRATES - May 16th, 2012

Technology 101

Typical River Transport has a Flat Bottom and a Shallow Draft with Little Freeboard

What do most of the oldest and greatest cities in the world have in common?  Madrid.  Lisbon.  Paris.  London.  Amsterdam.  Belgrade.  Vienna.  Rome.  Cairo.  Kiev.  Moscow.  Baghdad.  New Delhi.  Shanghai.  Ho Chi Minh City.  Bangkok.  Hong Kong.  São Paul.  Buenos Aires.  Santiago.  Quebec City.  Montreal.  Detroit.  Boston.  New York.  Philadelphia.  Pittsburgh.  What do these cities have in common?  Rivers.  Coastal water.  Or safe harbors on the oceans.

Why is this?  Is it because their founders liked a good view?  That’s why people today pay a premium to live on the water’s edge.  But back then it was more necessity than view.  These were times before railroads.  Even before roads connected these new cities.  Back then there was only one way to transport things.  On the water.  And rivers were the early highways that connected the cities.  Which is why we built our cities on these rivers.  To transport the food or raw materials a city produced.  And to transport to these cities the things they needed to survive and grow.  And some of the earliest river transports were flat-bottomed boats.  Like the scow.  Punt.  Sampan.  And the barge.

Rivers are calm compared to the oceans.  Which allows a different boat design.  River transport doesn’t have to be sturdy to withstand rolling waves and high winds.  Which allows the design to focus on the main purpose of a boat.  Hauling freight.  Typical river transport has a flat bottom.  A shallow draft with little freeboard (i.e., sitting very low in the water with the top deck very close to the surface of the water).  And a square bow.  This allows these boats to operate in shallow waters.  Allowing them to run up right onto a river landing or beach.  Where they can be easily loaded with their cargoes.  Or unloaded.  And their flat, rectangular shapes maximize the cargo they can carry.  Propulsion is simple.  A man can push a small boat along with a pole.  Animal power can pull larger barges.  Or, later, motors were able to power them.  Or a tugboat could pull or push them.

The Chinese Junk had a Flat Bottom with no Keel allowing them to Carry a Lot of Cargo

These flat-bottomed boats are great for hauling freight.  But they are not very seaworthy.  Because the ocean’s waves will toss around any boat with a shallow draft and little freeboard.  Breaking it up and sending it and its cargo to the bottom of the ocean.  Which has confined these to the calm of rivers, bays and coastal waterways.  Cargoes that have to travel further than these allow are loaded onto an ocean-going vessel with a deeper draft.  And a higher freeboard.  With a keel.  That can withstand the leeward force of the wind.  So instead of being pushed sideways (or simply rolling over) the keel allows those sideway winds to fill a sail and propel a ship forward.  By sticking deeper into the water.  So as the wind tries to push the boat sideways the large amount of water in contact with the keel pushes back against that leeward force.  Allowing it to sail across the wind.

But there is a tradeoff.  The curved sections of the hull that form the keel reduces the amount of cargo a ship can carry in its hull.  Also, these ocean-going vessels have a lot of sail.  And a lot of rigging to hold it in place.  Standing rigging.  While the sails required running rigging.  To raise and lower sails depending on the wind conditions.  Which takes up space that can’t be used for cargo.  And requires a lot of sailors.  In fact, much of the upper deck is full of rigging and sailors instead of cargo.  But this was the tradeoff to sail into the rougher waters of the ocean.  You had to sacrifice revenue-earning cargo.  But there was one ship design that brought together the benefits of the flat-bottomed river scow and the ocean-going fully rigged sailing ship.  The Chinese junk.

The Chinese junk dates as far back as the 3rd century BC.  And began crossing oceans as early as the second century AD.  Long before the Europeans ventured out in their Age of Discovery.  The junk has a flat bottom with no keel.  But a high freeboard.  Which lets it carry a lot of cargo.  And operate in shallower waters than a fully rigged sailing ship.  But it could also sail in the rougher seas of the ocean.  When it did it lowered a daggerboard.  A centerboard that can lower from a watertight trunk within the hull into the water to act like a keel.  To resist those leeward forces.  Often installed forward in the hull so as not to take up valuable cargo space in the center of the ship.  Because they mount this forward the leeward forces could cause the back end of the ship to torque around the daggerboard. To counteract this force they use an oversized rudder on the stern.  To balance the resistance to those leeward forces.  Because the rudder was so large and had to deflect a lot of water it was difficult to turn.  Taking a team of men to operate it.   To help turn such a large rudder they developed ‘powered’ steering.  With a balanced rudder.  The axis the rudder turned on was just behind the leading edge of the rudder.  So when they turned the rudder the water hitting the part in front of the turning axis helped turn the rudder in the direction the crew was trying to turn it.  So the large rudder area past the turning axis could deflect the large volume of water necessary to turn the ship.

The Chinese gave us Papermaking, Printing, the Compass and Gunpowder but the Europeans Conquered the World

So the junk could travel in the shallow waters of harbors and rivers.  And the deep water of the ocean.  It was the first ship to compartmentalize the hull.  Making it very seaworthy.  Especially if it struck bottom and punched a hole in the hull.  Because of the compartments the flooding was contained to the one compartment.  Allowing the ship to remain afloat.  A design all ships use today.  The junk also used a different sailing rig.  The junk rig.  It’s low tech.  Was inexpensive.  And required smaller crews.

A three-mast junk has three masts.  And three sails.  One sail per mast.  And the masts are free standing.  They don’t need any standing rigging to hold them in place.  Because they don’t carry heavy loads of running rigging and sailors.  The sail is stretched between a yard and a boom.  The yard is at the top.  The boom is along the bottom.  Between the yard and the boom battens give the sail strength and attach it to the mast.  Think of a batten as that stick in the bottom of a window shade.  Grabbing this batten allows you to apply an even force on that window shade when pulling it down.  If this stick wasn’t there and you pulled down on the window shade the uneven forces across the shade would tear it.  Same principle on a junk rig.  Which allows them to use less expensive sail material.  To raise this sail up the mast you pulled up the yard via a block and tackle at the top of the mast.  From the deck.  With fewer crew members.  The sail is attached to the mast near one edge.  It’s pivoted to catch and redirect wind to the stern.  Propelling the ship forward.  And the battens will bend in strong enough winds to curve the sail.  Creating lift on the other side of the sail to pull the ship forward.

The Chinese gave us papermaking, printing, the compass and gunpowder.  But it was the Europeans that used these inventions to conquer the world.  For the Chinese had no interest in civilizations outside of China.  For when you had the best, they thought, what was the point?  So the Europeans came to them.  Even took Hong Kong from them.  When it was the Chinese that could have had the technologically advanced civilization.  An army fielding muskets and cannon.  And a navy of junk warships that could have gone anywhere the Europeans could have gone.  And farther.  Into the shallow waters and up the rivers where the European warships could not go.  They could have sailed up the Thames to London.  Up the Seine to Paris.  Even into Amsterdam.  Home of the Dutch East India Company.  That took such a great interest in all those Asian goods in the first place.   That brought the British to China to compete against the Dutch.  Leading to the Opium Wars.  And the loss of Hong Kong.  Imagine how different the world would be had China embraced their technology.  Like they are today.  Perhaps we will soon see the answer to that great ‘what if’ question.

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Marine Insurance, General Average, Mesopotamia, Genoa, Middle Class, Capitalism, London Coffeehouses and Lloyd’s of London

Posted by PITHOCRATES - April 3rd, 2012

History 101

It was in Genoa that Marine Insurance became a Standalone Industry

Risk management dates back to the dawn of civilization.  Perhaps the earliest device we used was fire.  Fire lit up the caves we moved into.  And scared the predators out.  As we transitioned from hunting and gathering to farming we gathered and stored food surpluses to help us through less bountiful times.  To avoid famine.  As artisans rose up and created a prosperous middle class we also created defensive military forces.  To protect that prosperous middle class from outsiders looking to plunder it.

As we put valuable cargoes on ships and sent them long distances over the water we encountered a new kind of risk.  The risk that these cargoes wouldn’t make it to their destinations.  So we created marine insurance.  Including something called ‘general average’.  An agreement where the several shippers shared the cost of any loss of cargo.  If they had to jettison some cargo overboard to save the rest of the cargo or to save the ship.  Some of the proceeds from the cargo they delivered paid for the cargo they didn’t deliver.  Some merchants who borrowed money to finance a shipment paid a little extra.  A risk ‘premium’.  Should the shipment not reach its destination the lender would forgive the loan.

So how long has marine insurance been around?  A long time.  Some of these practices were noted in the Code of Hammurabi (circa 1755 B.C.).  For ancient Mesopotamia was a trading civilization.  That shipped on the Tigris and Euphrates and their tributaries.  Out into the Arabian sea.  And beyond.  Following the coasts until advances in navigation and sail power took them farther from land.  The Greeks and Romans insured their valuable cargoes, too.  As did the Italian city-states that followed them.  Who ruled Mediterranean trade.  And it was in Genoa that marine insurance became a standalone industry.  No longer bundled with other contracts for an additional fee.

As the British Maritime Industry took off so did Lloyd’s of London

But the cargoes got larger.  And the voyages went farther.  Until they were crossing the great oceans.  Increasing the chances that this cargo wasn’t going to make it to its destination.  And when they didn’t the financial losses were larger than ever before.  Because the ships were larger than ever before.  So as the center of shipping moved from the Mediterranean to the ocean trade routes plied by the Europeans (Portugal, Spain, France, the Netherlands and England) the insurance industry followed.  And took the concept of risk management to new levels.

With trade came a prosperous middle class.  Where wealth was no longer the privilege of landholders.  Capitalism transferred that wealth to manufacturers, bankers, merchants, ship owners and, of course, insurers.  You didn’t have to own land anymore to be rich.  All you needed was skill, ability and drive.  It was a brave new world.  And these new capitalists gathered together in London coffeehouses to discuss business.  Including one owned by Edward Lloyd.  On Tower Street.  Where those particularly interested in shipping came to learn the latest in this industry.  And it was where shippers and merchants came to find underwriters to insure their ships and cargoes.

This was the birth of Lloyd’s of London.  And as the British maritime industry took off so did Lloyd’s of London.  As the British Empire spread across the globe international trade grew to new heights.  The Royal Navy protected the sea lanes for that trade.  The British Army protected their far-flung empire.  And Lloyd’s of London insured that valuable cargo.  It was a very symbiotic relationship.  All together they made the British Empire rich.  To show their appreciation of the Royal Navy making this possible Lloyd’s set up a fund to provide for those wounded in the service of their county following Lord Nelson’s victory over the combined French and Spanish fleets at the Battle of Trafalgar.  They continue to provide support for veterans today.  In short, Lloyd’s of London was the place to go to meet your global insurance needs.  From marine insurance they branched into providing ‘inland marine’ insurance needs.  Providing risk management to property beyond ships plying the world’s oceans. 

The Purpose of Insurance is to Let Life Go On after Unexpected and Catastrophic Events

Cuthbert Heath led Lloyd’s in the development of the non-marine insurance business.  Underwriting policies for among other things earthquake and hurricane insurance coverage.   And Lloyd’s helped to rebuild San Francisco after the 1906 earthquake.  With Heath ordering that they pay all of their policies in full irrespective of their policy terms.  They could do that because they were profitable.  Which is a good thing.  Insurers need to be profitable to pay these large claims without being forced out of business.  Which is why when the Titanic sunk in 1912 they were able to pay all policies in full.  And to continue on insuring the shippers and merchants that followed Titanic.  To allow life to proceed after these great tragedies.  And they would do it time and again.  Following 9/11.  And Hurricane Katrina.

This is the purpose of insurance.  Risk management.  So unexpected and catastrophic events don’t end life as we know it.  But, instead, it allows us to carry on.  Even after some of the worst disasters.  Because life must go on.  And that’s what insurance does.  Even people who rely on a particular body part for their livelihood have gone to Lloyd’s to buy insurance.  Perhaps the most famous being Betty Grable.  Who insured her legs for $1 million in 1940.  Pittsburgh Steeler Troy Polamalu has a lucrative endorsement with a shampoo company.  And insured his long hair for $1 million.  Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards insured his hands for $1.6 million.  America Ferrera (Ugly Betty) has an endorsement deal with a toothpaste company.  And they insured her smile for $10 million.  Even ‘the Boss’ Bruce Springsteen insured his voice for $6 million. 

People hate insurance companies.  Because they don’t understand how insurance works.  For they only know that they pay a lot in premiums and never receive anything in return.  But this is the way risk management is supposed to work.  And we need risk management.  We need insurance companies.  And we need insurance companies to be profitable.  Meaning that most of us will never see anything in return for all of our premium payments.  So these companies can pay for the large losses of the few who sadly do see something in return for all of their payments.  For insurance companies protect our wealth.  And earning potential.  So life can go on.  Whether we’re raising a family and planning for our children’s future.  Or taking precautions for some unforeseen accident to one of our body parts that may limit our future earning potential.

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FUNDAMENTAL TRUTH #21: “The reason why health insurance is so expensive is because it is not insurance.” -Old Pithy

Posted by PITHOCRATES - July 6th, 2010

YOU CAME IN with a grand ‘to lose’ but have been riding a hot streak.  You’re up 5 grand.  And feeling luckier still.  You came in with a grand, you think, so you can just as well leave with a grand.  So you bet 5 grand.  Cause those cards have been so good to you tonight.  And there it is.  Blackjack!  And just as you’re about to shout to the heavens you see the dealer throw an ace on his down card.  The dealer asks, “Insurance?”   

You don’t want to but you just KNOW what’s under that ace.  All of a sudden you’re not so cavalier about losing 5 grand.  Too many friends have told you the same story.  “I was up 5 grand until that last hand.”   You could cry.  You don’t buy insurance.  Only suckers buy insurance.  That’s what you’ve always said.  But when you’ve got 5 grand on the table, the dealer can’t have anything but blackjack.  You know it.  He knows it.  And your wife knows it even though she’s off playing the slots somewhere.  You pull out $2,500 from your ‘do not touch’ money and buy the insurance.  (Let’s end this on a happy note.  The down card was a queen.  You walk away as if that last hand never happened, $5,000 richer.  Less taxes, of course.)

LIFE’S BEEN GOOD.  You’re making good money.  You have a beautiful wife and 3 great kids.  You just sold that small house and moved into that big house you always wanted for the holidays.  Cost a pretty penny.  But you had $75,000 in equity in the old home.  And cashed in a CD to furnish the new one with some nice new toys.  After all, life has been good.

The mortgage stings a little, but not too much.  You’ll get by.  You got all the big things you’ve wanted.  Now you can settle in and live modestly in your new home.  And you bought insurance up the wazoo.  If there is fire, flood, theft or death, no worries.  Well, there’ll be some worry, but you won’t financially ruin your family.  They’ll keep the house.  And there will be college for the kids.  Because you were responsible.  You protected the greatest investment of your life.  Yes, things have been good.  But not good enough to pay for everything twice.

TRADE EXPLODED IN the 17th century as little wooden ships crossed the oceans.  Storms and rough seas, though, toss around little wooden ships.  A lot of them sank.  With their cargoes.  But they didn’t all sink.  So owners insured their ships and cargoes.  For a nominal fee, they protected their investment.  For those that didn’t sink, the insurance wasn’t much of an added expense.  For those that did sink, it paid to replace the lost ship and cargo. 

YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED to open a restaurant.  And your dream finally came true.  You saved for years.  You scrimped on vacations.  Didn’t by a new car.  Expensive toys.  No.  Your years of denying yourself the little pleasures in life saved up enough money to buy that restaurant.  To put enough money down to borrow to fit out the kitchen and dining area.  To stock your fridge, freezer and pantry.  You maxed out your credit and sunk your life savings into your dream.  And you’re loving it.  But you don’t want to lose it.  So you have all the insurances.  Fire.  Property.  Workers’ comp.  Liability.  So in case of fire, celebrating students (who trash the town after winning the championship), a strained employee back or an E. coli outbreak (because an employee didn’t wash his hands after using the toilet), you’re protected.  Your business may suffer, as they are wont to do after an E. coli outbreak, but the lawsuits won’t leave you destitute.

BEING IN THE NFL is a dream come true to many athletes.  But it can be a brutal occupation.  Compared to other professional sports, it has a short season.  Why?  Attrition.  Concussions, broken bones, torn ligaments and contusions take their toll.  The short season allows a longer healing period.  And time for surgeries.

Players can make obscene amounts of money.  But they can also suffer a career-ending injury in the first year of a multi-year contract. Great playing potential means great earning potential.  If you stay healthy and play.  Of course, if injured, all gone.  Some players insure against a career-ending injury.  Lloyd’s of London will insure an athlete.  For a price.  It ain’t cheap.  But if it keeps you from losing, say, 20 million in earnings, it could turn out to be quite the bargain.  If you’ve got huge potential.

THE MOST PRECIOUS gift we all have is our life.  So we take care of it.  We watch what we eat, don’t drink, don’t smoke, don’t take drugs, don’t speed in our cars or while on our motorcycles, don’t drink and drive, don’t drive around flashing railroad crossing barriers, don’t binge drink, don’t have unprotected sex, don’t play with matches or run with scissors and don’t do that thing where you jump up on a railing with a skateboard and fall, crushing your testicles on the railing and hitting your head on the concrete step.  No, we exercise, go to bed early and eat a lot of bran. 

All right, we probably don’t eat as much bran as we should.  And maybe we do a risky thing or two.  But we understand that those risky things we DO do can cost us.  Could wipe us out financially.  So we buy insurance to protect our life savings in the event of a catastrophic event that could be medically very expensive.

Or do we?

EVERYONE THAT HAS ever bought blackjack insurance didn’t get a winning blackjack hand.  Everyone that has ever bought homeowner’s insurance didn’t get a new home with their policy.  Everyone that has ever bought mariner’s insurance didn’t get a ship and a cargo of goodies with their premium payment.  Everyone that has ever bought business insurance didn’t get a business with their payment.  And an NFL player doesn’t get a dime from Lloyd’s of London until something pretty horrible happens first.  No.  These purchases were ‘just in case’.  Most people will never get anything for their payments (other than peace of mind).  Only those who suffer a loss will.  And those that do will have mitigated their financial losses with the insurance they so wisely purchased.  And they will get on with their lives.

This is insurance.   We use it to protect our wealth.  It takes a lot of time to accrue it.  So when we have it, we tend to protect it.  We do risky things.  And insurance manages that risk.  So we don’t lose everything we have because of a catastrophic event. 

We don’t think like this when it comes to health insurance, though.  We don’t think of health insurance as a way to manage our risk.  We look at it as a free ride.  If we have it, we expect free health care.  We want everything.  But we don’t want to pay for anything.  Free mammograms.  Those blue pills for the old johnson.  Heart valves.  Prenatal care.  Child vaccination.  Etc.

The problem is, these things cost.  A lot.  And if anybody can have them, those who actually pay for insurance have to pay for them.  And they’ll be paying for things they aren’t using.  All those things listed above mean nothing to a young single male.  But he’s helping to pay for that stuff.  Either by his premium contribution.  Or in lost wages.  Because an employer can’t afford such quality health insurance AND high wages.

Health insurance has become nothing more than a wealth transfer.  It’s like a Ponzi scheme.  A large and ‘growing’ group of healthy young people pay into the system and collect few benefits.  The ‘fewer’, older, sicker people pay little into the system but consume the lion’s share of the benefits.  At least in theory.  But like social security, and all Ponzi schemes, the theory doesn’t work in practice.

AMERICA HAS THE best health care in the world.  If you judge by where the affluent go for their health care.  They go to America.  And the best is never cheap.  You get what you pay for.  And if you want the best, expect to pay.  A lot.

All right, we have the best and some of the most expensive health care in the world.  Add to that an aging population.  What do you get?  A shrinking group of people (the young and healthy) paying for a growing group of people (the old and sick).  That means the burden on those paying into the system has to what?  It has to keep getting bigger.

But it can’t.  The young and healthy will just opt out.  Eventually.  When it gets to the point that it’s a car payment or a health insurance payment, what do you think they’ll choose?  Their annual health care expenses for an entire year may not equal one premium payment.  So they’ll say screw that.  And do.  A lot of young do not have health insurance because they choose not.  It’s just too fricking expensive.  And this just shrinks the shrinking group more.  Which increases the amount those with insurance pay.  And so it goes.

AND YOU DON’T fix this problem by nationalizing health care.  That doesn’t address the problem.  You have to tie the cost to the benefit.  People only chose to pay for things they get.  Those receiving the benefit, then, need to pay its cost.  Like we do with every other thing in our lives.  You want a TV you pay for a TV.  You don’t pay for one so your neighbor can have one.  TV prices are very reasonable, too.  They keep coming down.  The quality is fantastic.  And so it would be in health care.

Single payer health care insurance ain’t the answer either.  Because it’s not insurance.  It’s a wealth transfer.  That means it’s political.  It will serve political ends.  Not make good health care.  First of all, they’ll force the young and healthy to pay for insurance under penalty of law.  Or they’ll raise taxes until it hurts.  Then they’ll cut costs.  First by limiting what doctors can earn.  Then they’ll limit the profits the pharmaceuticals can make.  Then the medical device makers will have their turn.  Soon, people won’t want to be doctors any more.  Or make new and life saving drugs.  Or make medical devices.  So when the supply of these things falls, rationing must follow.  And if you really want to cut costs, there’s really only one place to do it.  The really sick and the really old.  These people, after all, consume the lion’s share of health care services. 

We don’t have a health care problem.  People are living longer than ever.  We have a dependency problem.  The current system has made us dependent on others for our health care.  And dependency kills.  It cowers a people.  Takes away their dignity.  Makes them subservient.  People live in fear.  Of what they may lose.  Nationalizing health care will only make us more dependent.  It’s not the answer.  Unless you want to conquer and subjugate a people.  I mean, how many of you have stayed at job you absolutely hated because of the health insurance?  If that ain’t subjugated, I don’t know what is.  As bad as that was, at least you got something for it.  Good health care.  If you think you’re going to get that under a national system, think again.  Or ask those people with a national system that come to this country for better care.

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