Government Bureaucrats are bad for your Health in the UK and in the US

Posted by PITHOCRATES - March 2nd, 2011

 To be Great be like Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan

People have said that the British and the Americans are one people separated by a common language.  We’re very similar.  Even if we speak the Queen’s English a bit differently.  It turns out that’s not the only thing we share.  We also bend over backwards to compare ourselves with great conservatives from our past (see Look at what the Conservatives are achieving by Michael Fallon, MP for Sevenoaks and deputy chairman of the Conservative Party, posted 3/2/2011 on the UK’s Telegraph).

Yes, Thatcher abolished the dock labour scheme – 10 years after she was elected. Yes, she tackled trade union power: they finally lost their closed shop in 1988, nine years after she started. Yes, she set up grant-maintained schools, independent of local authorities. But when we left office, they comprised less than 5 per cent of the country’s total.

David Cameron’s Government has moved further and faster. Take the public finances: public borrowing, cyclically adjusted, will be 0.3 per cent of GDP by 2015, well below the 2.6 per cent it was in 1990, and the budget will be back in surplus. Corporation tax was 34 per cent when Thatcher left office; by 2015 it will be 24 per cent. Small business tax, 25 per cent in1990, will have fallen to 20 per cent.

Not only is David Cameron Thatcher-like, he’s even out ‘Thatchered’ her.  This speaks volumes about the greatness of Margaret Thatcher.  In America, it’s the other half of that dynamic duo.  Ronald Reagan.  Come election time, every candidate is trying to show how Ronald Reagan he or she is.  Even the Democrats.  Even Barak Obama as his poll numbers plunge.

For a first-term prime minister leading an entirely novel coalition, the essential tasks might be enough: growing the economy; weaning it off its over-reliance on public spending, financial services and an unsustainable property boom; and pulling our finances back from the brink over which Greece and Ireland plunged.

Yet far more significant is the quiet revolution that is turning government inside out – away from Whitehall and targets and regional authorities and back to councils, GPs, head teachers, police commanders, community groups and charities. Ending the state monopoly in almost all public services, encouraging new providers, ensuring competition and choice – these are the most radical reforms since the Attlee government.

And Obama couldn’t be any more un-Ronald Reagan-like if he tried.  He’s trying to take America in the opposite direction that David Cameron is trying to take the UK.  Cameron is trying to decentralize while Obama is trying to centralize.  Especially health care.

Poor Quality, High Cost and Rationing in the National Health Service

The National Health Service in the UK has high costs and quality concerns.  The costs have been addressed in the past by rationing services.  The quality concerns have been addressed by layers of bureaucracy that have often been the original cause of the quality concern.

The problem with the NHS is size.  It’s a behemoth.  And because of that, it has layers of bureaucracy.  Which results in bureaucrats making decisions for patients instead of doctors.  They’re trying to change all this by grouping together and empowering local general practitioners (GPs) into consortia (see Hospitals shake-up essential, says King’s Fund by Nick Triggle posted 3/2/2011 on the UK’s BBC).

The government has protected the NHS budget by giving it small above-inflation budget rises over the next four years.

But the report said it was still entering a “cold climate” because demands and costs were outstripping the settlement.

It said without change there could be a “downward” spiral of falling income, growing deficit and declining quality.

Will this fix all the woes of the NHS?

Scandals such as Mid Staffordshire, where an official report found hundreds of patients died needlessly because of poor care, could not be ruled out.

Probably not.  But it’s a step in the right direction.  For the patients, at least.

A Department of Health spokesman said GP consortia would strengthen the ability of the NHS to make the right decisions.

“We urgently need to modernise the NHS – that is why our plans include many measures to make services more responsive to patients and to consistently drive up quality.”

The key to good health care has always been the doctor patient relationship.  The more people that get in between the doctor and the patient the poorer the health care gets.  Because the focus shifts from quality to cost efficiency.

This is a step in the right direction, but it’s still a heavy bureaucracy.  There is another way to ensure quality, though.  Competition.  When my dad had his first heart attack the paramedics gave us a choice of two hospitals they could take him to.  One had a bad reputation.  The other didn’t.  We chose the one with the good reputation. 

That other hospital continued to do poorly for years and eventually had financial troubles.  Then a big hospital bought it and brought it up to their standards.  And many years later, both of these hospitals are now providing quality care.  You see, competition makes everything better.  Even health care.

Using High-Fructose Corn Syrup instead of Sugar making us Obese?

The British and Americans have something else in common.  We like our sweets.  While one of us loses their teeth to this indulgence, the other has gotten obese (see The Fight Over High-Fructose Corn Syrup by Sharon Begley posted 2/28/2011 on The Daily Beast).

Now a stream of studies shows that sugar and corn sweeteners differ in important ways, including how they affect the appetite-control centers in the brain. That suggests that [High-Fructose Corn Syrup] HFCS may be partly responsible for the obesity epidemic…

The new study is too small to decide the question—it included only nine people—but it fits with other research on both humans and lab animals.  Scientists led by Jonathan Purnell of Oregon Health & Science University gave fructose, glucose, or salt water to volunteers and then measured brain activity with functional MRI scans. Over several regions of the cortex, activity increased in people given glucose but decreased in those given fructose, the scientists will report in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. Cortical regions that responded differently included the orbital prefrontal, a key player in the reward circuit, and regions that process the pleasurable effects of food. “It’s evidence that fructose and glucose elicit opposite responses in the human brain,” says Purnell…

Rats eating equal calories from the two gained significantly more weight on HFCS than on table sugar, scientists led by Bart Hoebel of Princeton reported in 2010. The HFCS-fed animals also had increases in abdominal fat and triglycerides. And in a 2010 review, scientists at the University of California, Davis, noted that, in people, fructose added to abdominal fat and other measures “associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.” HFCS is not the sole culprit in obesity. But the body and brain don’t seem to treat it as an innocent bystander, either.

Great Britain’s early Caribbean colonial possessions sent shiploads of cane sugar back to England for their tea.  And to make their chocolates.  They so liked their sweets.  And, as a consequence of this sugary indulgence, their bad teeth are legendary in the world of dental hygiene.  George Harrison even wrote a song about a fellow Brit with a chocolate addiction.  Eric Clapton.  Who he warned that he’ll have to have all his teeth pulled out after the Savoy Truffle (a song on the BeatlesWhite Album).

So the British are the butt of many a dental hygiene joke.  But they aren’t obese.  Like the Americans are.  Who also have a sweet tooth.  But we don’t eat sugar.  We eat HFCS.  Why?  Not because we prefer it.  But because of our government.  Big Corn lobbies Congress for sugar tariffs.  And Congress delivers.  Which makes imported sugar more expensive than HFCS.  So we eat HFCS not by choice.  But by government fiat.  And it now appears it may be part of the cause for the explosion in obesity and diabetes in America.  How about that? 

Yet another reason to keep government bureaucrats out of our health care system.

Conservatism Works every time it’s Tried

Bureaucrats are good at shuffling paper.  They aren’t good research scientists.  Or doctors.  So it’s best to keep them shuffling paper.  And let the professionals determine what we should eat.  What we probably shouldn’t eat.  And take care of us when we get sick.  I’m sure we’d all live a longer and healthier life if we do.

The dynamic duo of Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan knew this.  Their conservatism worked.  It made the UK and the US great again.  And this is why everyone bends over backwards to show how much they are like these great conservatives from our past.  Even those who couldn’t be more opposed to their philosophy.  Because they know that conservatism works and has worked every time it’s been tried.  And they’re willing to admit that (a little) at election time.  Even if they’re lying through their teeth.  That is, if they haven’t been pulled out yet after the Savoy Truffle.

www.PITHOCRATES.com

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,