Vacuum Toilet

Posted by PITHOCRATES - April 24th, 2013

Technology 101

The Siphon in a Flush Toilet sucks the Waste out of the Toilet Bowl

The common flush toilet in our homes is located in a bathroom.  A dedicated room in our houses.  Often times tucked away off of a bedroom.  Private and secure.  Where we can take care of any of our business with comfort and dignity.  It’s nice.  Hiding that part of our life away from the rest of the world.  In fact, some people are such nervous pooers that they can’t go anywhere but at home.  Lucky for them they didn’t live in ancient Rome where communal toilets were long benches with holes in them.  And people sat next to each other while doing their business.  Elbow to elbow.  Literally.

What makes the flush toilet in our homes possible is basically one thing.  They don’t move.  They’re permanent installations that sit on terra firma.  And because of that they can use gravity.  When we flush a toilet water pours down from a tank into a bowl.  Forcing the contents of the bowl up and over the drain out of the bowl.  The siphon.  Filling this pipe completely with water.  So that when the water falls down into the sanitary sewer pipe it creates a siphon.  Pulling everything behind it down into the sanitary drain.  Where gravity pulls it down to pipes under our houses and into the sanitary sewer system under the street in front of our house.  Where these pipes slope downhill towards the wastewater treatment plant.

The flush toilet works in our house because they don’t move.  And we can dig pipes deep underground.  Two things we can’t do on boats, trains and planes.  So early boats and trains had a simple toilet.  If you looked down into the toilet seat on a boat you saw the water.  And if you looked down into the toilet seat on a train you saw the railroad track underneath.  Which could really chill a pair of butt cheeks on a crisp winter day.  Making a cold toilet seat in your bathroom in the morning seem toasty warm by comparison.  Early planes had a chemical toilet.  Basically a port-a-potty.  Filling the air with the aroma of a construction site toilet.

The Suction of a Vacuum Toilet is greater than the Siphon of a Flush Toilet

Today in most countries you can’t defecate into a river, lake or ocean.  Or onto railroad tracks.  It’s not sanitary.  And just plain disgusting.  But because boats, trains and planes move a flush toilet with a bowl full of water just isn’t an option.  Because water in a moving bowl tends to splash out of the bowl.  Which can splash corrosive waste in nooks and crannies around the toilet.  Making a mess in the lavatory.  Though chemical toilets were an option and we used them for some time they just didn’t smell good.  Especially on an airplane.  As you just couldn’t roll the window down for some fresh air.

A flush toilet on an airplane has another problem.  Water has mass.  To carry water for flush toilets increases the weight of the airplane.  Requiring more fuel.  As fuel is the greatest cost of flying airlines and aircraft manufacturers do everything within their power to reduce the weight of an airplane.  Which is why today’s aircraft use a vacuum toilet system.  Where instead of using water and gravity to create a siphon they use a vacuum pump to create a suction.  A vacuum toilet does not use water.  There is no water in the bowl.  When you ‘flush’ a drain opens in the bottom of the bowl and a powerful vacuum sucks it clean.

The suction of a vacuum toilet is greater than the siphon of a flush toilet.  Allowing smaller pipes as the powerful suction does not allow any clogging of pipes.  Smaller pipes (and no water like in a flush toilet) reduce weight.  Helping to cut the cost of flying.  That powerful suction also sucks out all of the stink with each flush.  Another benefit of the vacuum toilet.  Which is a good thing in a small room without a window you can open.

A Truck transfers the Sanitary Waste from an Aircraft Holding Tank into the Sanitary Sewer System

Planes pitch up, pitch down and bank left and right.  Which would be a problem for wastewater moving under the force of gravity.  Or for water in a bowl.  Which is another benefit of a vacuum toilet system.  Which doesn’t use gravity.  Or water.  So the pipes of a vacuum toilet system can run in any direction.  Up, down or flat and level.  The force of the suction will pull the waste to the holding tank no matter the path it takes to the holding tank.

As the flight progresses people use the toilets.  And the holding tanks fill up with waste.  When they land they are pretty full.  And the airlines need to empty them.  If you ever watched an airplane at a gate after it lands you will see a whirlwind of activity.  Baggage and freight comes off.  Then they load baggage and freight for the next flight.  Cleaning crews enter the aircraft.  Food service cleans out the galleys and loads food and beverages for the next flight.  Fuel trucks refuel the aircraft (either from a fuel truck or a fuel hydrant system in the apron).  And then there’s the poop truck.  Which will open a hatch on the belly of the aircraft.  Connect a large hose.  Open a valve.  And drain the holding tank into the truck.  Pump in some blue disinfectant.  And make the toilets ready for the next flight.

The poop truck then drives someplace where they can dump their load.  Larger airports may have a special building for this.  Where they drive in and stop over a grate in the floor.  Dump their load onto the grate.  Water sprays onto the floor to help wash everything into and through the grate.  Where it falls into a ‘chopper’ pump to break down the solids more.  And then it enters the sanitary sewer system at the airport.  Where it uses gravity to flow downhill towards a wastewater treatment plant.  Just like it does when we use the bathroom in the privacy and security of our home.

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Outhouses and Flush Toilets

Posted by PITHOCRATES - April 17th, 2013

Technology 101

An Exceptional Builder of Outhouses will have the Door Swing Into the Outhouse

Before there was modern plumbing going to the bathroom often involved putting on a pair of boots and a coat.  And a short walk outside.  To a little outbuilding called an outhouse.  Which was a small shack over a hole in the ground.  With a bench with a hole in it to sit on.  Crude by today’s standards but it was living large a couple of centuries ago.  For it sure beat squatting on your haunches on a rainy day somewhere out in Mother Nature.

We’ve became very skilled in building outhouses.  Today you will see elaborate things in state parks sitting on a cement pit.  When it fills up they bring in a truck to pump it out.  So these could be rather permanent structures.  But we didn’t pump out our first outhouses.  When the hole underneath filled up we dug a new hole.  Moved the outhouse over on top of the new hole.  Cover the old hole.  Which required the outhouse to be more lightweight and portable.  Because we would move it every time the hole underneath filled up.

Now there was a certain science to building a good outhouse.  Certain considerations to take into account.  Such as where we dug the hole.  As they tended to stink having them as far away as possible from the home kept the air more enjoyable to breathe.  But it also meant longer treks during snowstorms when nature was calling.  So you didn’t want it too far.  But you didn’t want it too close.  And you especially didn’t want it anywhere near your well.  Unless you enjoyed bouts of dysentery and cholera.  And if you were making a trek through a foot or two of snow you appreciated what an exceptional builder of outhouses did for you.  He made the door open inward.  So you didn’t have to dig away a snowdrift to open the door to get inside.  Also, because they were rather lightweight, a heavy wind could blow them over.  If it fell forward onto its door you could find yourself trapped.  If the door opened inward, though, you would be able to open the door.  Get your feet onto terra firma.  And stand up and lift the outhouse upright.  Something you couldn’t do if the door opened outward.

The Flush Toilet has few Moving Parts and Operates with only Two Sources of Energy to Make it Work

Building a good outhouse required skill and experience.  Done right these wonderful things of low-tech provided years of reliable service.  Today we use another marvel of low-tech.  Allowing us to avoid a trek outdoors in a driving snowstorm when nature calls.  This marvel of engineering has brought that part of our life into the comfort and safety of our house.  A special room with a flush toilet.  Secured, heated and safe to walk to barefoot, the flush toilet has revolutionized taking care of nature’s business.  That special room inside our homes where we do more than take a bath.

What is truly amazing that people don’t even think about is that you can sit on the toilet while drawing a glass of drinking water.  We may not do this.  But we can.  (We don’t recommend this.  For flushing the toilet with the lid up could splash fecal material onto/into a drinking glass on your bathroom sink.  So if you like to drink while sitting on the toilet be sure to flush when sitting down or with the lid down).  Because of a fresh water system coming from one source.  And a sanitary sewer system going to a different destination.  Yet they come together in our bathroom.  With little chance of cross contamination.  So you could literally fill a glass of water and drink it while sitting on the toilet.  Perhaps even more incredible is that the flush toilet is the only thing in our home that is connected to both our fresh water system and our sanitary sewer system.  And still there is little risk of cross contamination.  Even an outhouse built 100 feet from the house could still contaminate your drinking water if the contents of the pit leeched into the ground water.  And came up your well.

The amazing flush toilet has few moving parts.  And operates with only two sources of energy to make it work.  The water pressure of city water.  And the human operation of the flush lever or button.  The city water fastens to the bottom of the water tank.  A water float opens and closes a water fill valve.  When the tank is full the float is at its highest, closing this valve.  When the water level in the tank drops it opens this valve and city water pressure forces water into the tank.  In case the valve sticks open there is an overflow tube to drain the excess water into the toilet bowl so it doesn’t flood the bathroom.  The tank sits on the toilet bowl.  Water enters the bowl from the tank through a 2-3″ drain hole.  A flapper valve covers this drain hole.  The weight of the water in the tank seals this watertight.  A chain runs from this flapper valve to the flush lever.  Most of the water enters the bowl via a small hole opposite a larger hole.  Where the water leaves the bowl and enters the sanitary sewer system.  The siphon.  While some of it flows out through the holes just under the rim.  The siphon curves up and then turns 180 degrees down.  The water in the bowl is at the same level as the bottom of the 180-degree turn in the siphon.  Creating a vapor lock so sewer gas can’t vent into the bathroom.

A Successful Toilet Flush requires Water to Fill the Siphon Completely and Form an Airtight Seal

Have you ever siphoned anything with a hose?  If you haven’t you can do a little experiment.  The next time you do your laundry plug the drain in the sink before the final rinse.  Get a short length of garden hose.  Place your thump over one end of the hose and fill the other end with water (you may need some help).  Once the hose is full of water place your other thumb over the other end.  Then place one end under the water level in the laundry tub.  And the other end near the floor drain (there should be one near your laundry tub).  The end of the hose at the drain will be lower than the end in the tub.  Now remove your thumbs from the ends of the hose.  You will see water run out of the hose onto the floor near the drain.  And as water leaves the hose it will pull more water into the hose from the laundry tub.  This is a siphon.  And it will keep siphoning water from the laundry tub until the water level falls below the open end of the hose in the tub.  Either when the tub is almost empty.  Or if you lift the hose out of the water.  Letting air into the hose.  Breaking the siphon.

This is how a flush toilet operates.  When you flush the toilet the chain lifts the flapper valve which will float upright as a couple of gallons of water pours into the bowl.  This rush of water will fill and seal the siphon.  As this water drains out of the siphon it will pull the water from the bowl.  As the tank drains into the bowl the siphon pulls it out, flushing it clean.  The water supply valve is open during this adding more water to this flushing action.  When the tank empties the flapper valve falls back over the drain hole.  And the tank refills with water.  When the volume of water flowing into the bowl reduces air enters the siphon.  Which, of course, breaks the siphon.  Ending the flushing cycle.  The water in the bowl settles at the height of the bottom of the 180-degree turn in the siphon.

The key for a successful flush is a large volume of water.  For unless the water fills the siphon completely and forms an airtight seal there will be no siphon.  And the toilet bowl won’t empty.  You can see this by pouring water into the bowl slowly.  When you do the water level doesn’t change.  And the toilet doesn’t flush.  The water just spills over the 180-degree turn in the siphon and into the sanitary drain pipe.  Only when there is a large volume of water flowing into the bowl will enough water flow into the siphon to form that airtight seal.  Allowing us to do our business without getting dressed and trudging outside through 2-foot snowdrifts in the middle of January.  Without worrying the building won’t blow over while we’re sitting inside doing our business.  Like they sometimes once did.  Despite how state of the art they were at one time.

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Bill Gates trying to Reinvent the Toilet for Countries without Clean Drinking Water and Wastewater Treatment Plants

Posted by PITHOCRATES - August 19th, 2012

Week in Review

Our bodily excretions are among the less pleasant things we do as humans.  For there is little dignity while having a bowel movement.  In modern countries we can at least do that behind closed doors.  But in developing countries they have no such luxuries as a closed bathroom door and a flush toilet to sit on.  And a sink with clean water to wash our hands in afterwards.  It’s kept us clean as a people.  And allowed people to work more closely together.  Even filling massive high-rises full of people.  Who can at anytime go to a clean restroom on their floor for a discrete and clean bowel movement.  Something we all take for granted.  Little realizing what a great gift that is (see Bill Gates challenges scientists to reinvent toilet by AP posted 8/15/2012 on The Telegraph).

Bill Gates, the Microsoft co-founder has challenged scientists to reinvent the lavatory for the 2.5 billion people in the world who have no access to modern sanitation…

The United Nations estimates disease caused by unsafe sanitation results in about half the hospitalisation in the developing world. About 1.5 million children die each year from diarrheal disease.

Scientists believe most of these deaths could be prevented with proper sanitation, along with safe drinking water and improved hygiene…

Flush lavatories waste tons of potable drinking water each year, fail to recapture reusable resources like the potential energy in solid waste and are simply impractical in so many places.

Yes, flush toilets are horrible.  Except, of course, in preventing mass hospitalization and death by diarrheal disease for millions of children.  Which is pretty nice to prevent.  But apart from making the developed world a much healthier place to live and to raise your children, what has the flush toilet done for us?

Yes, building a better toilet for the undeveloped world may help the undeveloped world.  But developing the undeveloped world would help them more.  It would give them flush toilets AND clean drinking water, hospitals, schools, grocery stores, etc.  And you don’t need to be blessed with natural resources to make this happen.  Two of the best places to live, Hong Kong and Singapore, are not blessed with natural resources.  But they have vibrant economies.  And it’s that vibrant free market economy that makes them great places to live.  And, of course, flush toilets.

High-tech toilets are nice.  But there are things better than high-tech toilets.  Like clean drinking water.  And wastewater treatment plants.  They’ve done great things in the developed world.  Even gave us the wealth to help the undeveloped world.  Because our hospitals aren’t full of people dying from diarrheal disease.  Instead they’re living healthy lives and contributing to vibrant economies.

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Outhouse, City Water, Sanitary Sewer System, Flush Toilet, Water Trap, Soil Stack, Sanitary Lift Stations, Weir Dam and Overflow Spillways

Posted by PITHOCRATES - April 11th, 2012

Technology 101

Before Indoor Plumbing People had to Walk some 50 Feet in Rain, Snow or Shine to go to the Bathroom

On the American sitcom The Beverly Hillbillies, Jed Clampett wasn’t sure if he should move his family to Beverly Hills after they found oil on his land.  He asks his cousin Pearl for advice.  She says, “Jed, how can you even ask? Look around you. You live eight miles from your nearest neighbor. You’re overrun with skunks, possums, coyotes, and bobcats. You use kerosene lamps for light.  You cook on a wood stove, summer and winter. You’re drinkin’ homemade moonshine, and washin’ with homemade lye soap. And your bathroom is fifty feet from the house. And you ask should you move!?”  Jed thinks about all of this and replies, “Yeah, I reckon you’re right. Man’d be a dang fool to leave all this.”  (This exchange begins at 11:40 on The Beverly Hillbillies (Season 1 – Ep. 1) The Clampetts Str).

On the American sitcom I Love Lucy, Tennessee Ernie Ford comes to visits the Ricardos in New York City.  On the day of his arrival, as he prepares to go to bed, he walks out of the apartment through the kitchen door with his suitcase.  Lucy and Ricky look at each other perplexed.  After a few minutes he comes back in and walks out of the apartment through the living room door.  After a few minutes he returns and approaches Ricky.  And whispers in his ear.  Exasperated, Ricky points and says, “Through the bedroom.”  In stunned disbelief Ernie says, “You mean it’s in the house?”  Ricky nods.  Ernie walks towards the bathroom and says, “Wait till I tell Mama about this.”  (See I Love Lucy Tennessee Ernie Visits).

Once upon a time, before indoor plumbing, people headed out of their house some 50 feet to go to the bathroom.  In rain, snow or shine.  To an outhouse.  Away from the main house.  Because of the stink.  And to keep their waste from seeping into the water table.  So their waste didn’t contaminate their drinking water.  So when they ever felt the call of nature they took that long walk.  Pushed open the door and squatted.  (Interesting fact: all outhouse doors open in for safety.  For if you were inside when a strong wind tipped the outhouse over you could open the door and then stand up, lifting the outhouse upright).  Or if it was a deluxe outhouse you may have sat down on some wooden planks.  Living like this was all well and fine when your nearest neighbor was 8 miles away.  Or in a suburban community with deep backyards.  For you could put your outhouse at the back fence.  Like your neighbor across the fence.  You can.  And some have.  But it’ll put a stink in the air.  And provide little privacy to do those most personal of things.  For when your neighbor sees the lady of the house walking back there it’s no secret what she’s going to do.

Flush Toilets are Possible thanks to City Water, Sanitary Sewer Systems, Water Traps and Stack Vents

Moving the bathroom into the house gave us true privacy.  So a lady could have a bowel movement without her neighbors knowing about it.  Two things made this possible.  City water.  And a sanitary sewer system.  These two things gave us the flush toilet.  A true marvel of engineering.  A porcelain bowl that holds a small amount of water.  Sitting on top of a pipe that ties into the sanitary sewer system.  A thing that makes the stink of an outhouse seem like a bouquet of roses.  Yet that stink doesn’t enter our homes.  Why?  Because of a simple thing called a water trap.  They come in a couple of shapes but typically have a u-shape somewhere in them.  Water enters and leaves at higher elevations.  Leaving the lower part always filled with water.  Providing a water seal between us and the stink of the sewer.  Thus preventing gases from entering our homes.  We build this trap right into our toilets.  On some models you can actually see the curly path the bowl drains into on the side of the toilet.

On top of the toilet base is a water tank.  With a valve and a float.  City water (under a slight pressure from the water plant) enters the tank through this valve.  When the tank is empty the valve is open and the water flows into the tank.  When the tank fills the float rises and closes the valve, shutting off the water flow.  At the bottom of the tank is a flapper valve.  When the tank is full of water the weight of the water presses down on this valve, sealing it shut.  When we flush the toilet we lift this flapper valve via a chain connected to a lever we operate with the flush handle on the toilet.  When we lift the valve the water in the tank can flow into the toilet bowl, washing the contents of the bowl into the pipe the toilet sits on.  As the water empties from the tank the flapper valve falls and seals the tank.  And with no water in the tank the float falls, opening the valve so water can refill the tank.

While the toilet tank fills because of the slight pressure they keep our city water under, the sanitary sewer system works under gravity alone.  All sewer lines in a building slope downward.  When they join other pipes they join in a ‘Y’ connection to make sure the new water entering another pipe enters flowing in the same direction of the water already in the pipe.  So as not to create any agitations or backpressure to the gravitational pull on the water.  To keep this water flowing in the downward direction.  If you have a basement in your house you can see a lot of this.  Downward sloping.  Y-fittings.  And you’ll also see one or two vertical pipes.  Soil stacks.  That other horizontal pipes run into.  Your sanitary waste (from floor drains, showers, sinks and toilets) flows to these soil stacks and down to a pipe under the floor that runs out to the sanitary line under the street.  If you follow these soil stacks up you’ll notice that they run all the way through the basement ceiling.  They in fact run all the way up and out through your roof.  Those little pipes you see protruding from your roof are stack vents.  These stack vents are critical in helping gravity work in your sanitary plumbing system.  By keeping a neutral pressure inside the pipes.  Making air pressure inside the pipes equal to the air pressure inside the house.  By equaling the air pressure on either side of the water traps the water stays in these traps.  If the system wasn’t vented the water wouldn’t stay in these traps.  As the column of falling water would compress the air below it creating a high pressure.  While creating a low pressure or vacuum above it.  Which would suck the water from the traps into the system above the falling water column.  And blow out the traps below the column.  Which would be rather nasty in the bathroom.  For it would blow raw sewage out of your toilet.  And onto you should you be in the bathroom at the time.

Sanitary Lift Stations have Backup Power and Failsafe Designs like Weir Dams and Overflow Spillways

At the beginning of all sanitary sew systems the pipes are their smallest.  Like inside a house where they connect to a floor drain, shower, sink or toilet.  As they join other pipes the pipe size increases.  To accommodate the increase in water volume.  The biggest pipe in a house is the one running to the sanitary line under the street in front of the house.  Which is a much bigger pipe as a sanitary line from each house connects to this line.  So it has to be big enough to handle all of the flow if everyone flushed their toilets at the same time.  Like at halftime during the Super Bowl.  And the pipes these ‘street mains’ connect to have to be even bigger.  For multiple ‘street mains’ connect to them.  And as more pipes join together they connect to even larger pipes.  And every one of these pipes is sloped downward to maintain the flow of water.  Pulled along by gravitational forces alone.  Which causes a problem.  Because continuously sloping bigger and bigger pipes downward will drive these pipes deeper and deeper underground.  Which can’t go on indefinitely.  As the ultimate destination is a wastewater treatment plant.  Which we typically don’t build underground.

So along the way we have to raise this wastewater so it can start its downward course again at a level closer to the surface.  We call these points sanitary lift stations.   Where a big pipe enters a wet well inside the station at a low elevation.  And exits the station at a higher elevation.  As water enters the wet well the water level slowly rises.  When the level reaches a certain elevation an automatic control system turns on pumps.  But not just any kind of pumps.  Some pumps with teeth.  That can grind up any solid waste that enters the sanitary sewer system.  From human waste.  To used condoms.  To feminine hygiene products.  And the myriad of other things that we shouldn’t flush down our toilets but do.  These pumps can pretty much grind up anything and spit it out into the discharge pipe of the station at a higher elevation.  So this wastewater can continue its journey to the wastewater treatment plant.

Some cities have a combined storm water and sanitary sewer system.  Which can tax the system during heavy rains.  For the water flowing into these wet wells will keep that level rising to a point the pumps may run continuously.  And should there be some damaging winds that take down the electrical grid these lift stations will throw-over to an emergency backup generator.  To keep those pumps running when we need them most.  To keep the water from rising too high in the wet well.  And the pipes feeding it.  For if those pipes fill up completely there will be no place for new water entering the sewer system to go.  Water will rise in manholes.  And out onto our streets.  Even out of our floor drains and into our houses.  As this would be a grave public health concern they often build failsafe protection in the sewer system.  The feed to the lift station will be a Y-connection.  Just past this will be a weir dam in the pipe.  A dam that blocks only the lower portion of the sewer pipe.  The pipe past this will run to some spillway into a river, lake or ocean.  If the flow in the pipe is too great for the lift station’s capacity it will spill over the weir dam and flow untreated directly into a larger body of water.  While this is bad it doesn’t happen often.  As it typically takes a ‘once in a hundred years’ rain to overtax a system.  And when it does there is so much storm water in the system that it greatly dilutes the harmful pathogens in the wastewater.

Our Sanitary Sewage Systems allow us to Draw Clean Drinking Water in the Same Room we Poop In 

Sanitary systems are gravity systems upstream.  As they get further downstream they get an assist from pumps.  As well as other powered valve and gates to redirect the water flow as necessary.  The bigger our cities get and the denser our city populations grow these active components become ever more critical to the gravity systems upstream.  So we provide backup power systems and failsafe designs.  We do everything possible to keep that wastewater flowing downstream and out of our homes.

Some of the greatest public health crises happen when these active systems break down.  For the power of gravity may influence our world a lot.  But the power of water is something to fear.  Especially when we lose control of it.  From tsunamis that overwhelm sewage systems in our coastal areas.  To 100-year rains that overwhelm our sewage systems in our interior areas.  To lift stations that fail and reverses the flow of wastewater in our sewage systems.  Worse yet is the discharge of raw sewage into our freshwater supplies.  That contaminate our fresh drinking water.  It doesn’t happen often but when it does it’s a health crisis of the first order.

But most times these systems work so well that we never think about them.  And can’t even imagine what life was like when you had to bundle up in the middle of winter and wade through thigh-deep snow to get to your bathroom.  Sitting on wooden planks in an unheated structure with the wind blowing through the slats.  Today we’re spoiled.  Not only do we not have to bundle up our bathrooms are heated.  And only a few steps away from us.  Because they are in the house.  Thanks to our sanitary sewage systems.  That can keep up with the waste production in our largest cities.  And allow us to draw clean drinking water in the same room we poop in.  If you really think about that it’s hard not to be as amazed as cousin Ernie was in I Love Lucy.

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The Tea Party vs. Occupy Wall Street

Posted by PITHOCRATES - October 7th, 2011

As far as Protest Movements go these Tea Party People can be Rather Boring

Everyone who follows the mainstream media knows that the Tea Party is nothing more than a bunch of radical racists out to raise hell and get into your face if you dare to disagree with them (see Glenn Beck on the Mall by Lexington posted 8/29/2010 on The Economist).

It is indeed both presumptuous and preposterous of Mr Beck to claim the mantle of Martin Luther King and the civil-rights movement for his own noxious style of politics. However, not seeing is believing: I saw no evidence at all of racism at this particular event. It was a good-natured, somewhat solemn, gathering of mostly white and well-to-do people from all over America who for some reason or other saw fit to respond to Mr Beck’s plea to show up to “restore” America’s honour. The main focus of the formal ceremony consisted of paying tribute to the country’s servicemen and veterans, of whom there were many in the crowd.

This was Glenn Beck‘s rally back in 2010.  Probably the most hated man in the Tea Party movement.  Those on the Left belittle and mock this man to no end.  Because they think he is dangerous.  Incendiary.  A racist of the first degree.  If so, where was the racism?  The radicalism?  The in your face anger?

As far as protest movements go these Tea Party people can be rather boring.

The Mark of a True Liberal is Being Generous with other People’s Private Property

So, yes, the Tea Party appears to be rather boring when they protest.  Can’t say that for the Occupy Wall Street people, though.  They’ve been pretty provocative.  Breaking the law.  Getting arrested.  And being really, really annoying (see For Some, Wall Street Is Main Street by Cara Buckley posted 10/7/2011 on The New York Times).

Panini and Company normally sells sandwiches to tourists in Lower Manhattan and the residents nearby, but in recent days its owner, Stacey Tzortzatos, has also become something of a restroom monitor. Protesters from Occupy Wall Street, who are encamped in a nearby park, have been tromping in by the scores, and not because they are hungry.

Ms. Tzortzatos’s tolerance for the newcomers finally vanished when the sink was broken and fell to the floor. She installed a $200 lock on the bathroom to thwart nonpaying customers, angering the protesters.

“I’m looked at as the enemy of the people,” she said.

I don’t recall the destruction of private party at any Tea Party rallies.

A sandwich shop is not a big corporation.  It’s a small business.  A Mom and Pop type store.  I don’t recall this demand on their list of demands.  Free access to use and destroy Mom and Pop stores everywhere for their exploitation of the working class.  All one or two that work for them.

Mothers have grown weary of navigating strollers through the maze of barricades that have sprouted along the streets. Toddlers have been roused from sleep just after bedtime by chanting and pounding drums.

Heather Amato, 35, a psychologist who lives near the protest area, said she felt disturbed by some of the conduct of the protesters. She said she had to shield her toddler from the sight of women at the park dancing topless.

I can’t understand why these people would have trouble getting a job.  Chanting and pounding drums at all hours of the night.  And girls getting so drunk that they let the Bobbsey Twins out in public.  (If you ever been on spring break you know you usually don’t see the girls come out until after vast amounts of alcohol have been consumed.  ).  If that doesn’t say responsibility and punctuality I don’t know what does.

The site of the protests, Zuccotti Park, is privately owned but open to the public. Melissa Corley, a spokeswoman for Brookfield Office Properties, which owns the park, said in a statement that sanitation conditions had reached “unacceptable levels.”

If you’ve never been to an outdoor concert let me clarify.  There’s trash everywhere.  And lots of pee.  Perhaps even some poop.  Sad to say I knew of a guy in construction that liked to leave ‘surprises’ for his coworkers.  In a trench.  In a dumpster.  In an attic.  He just thought it was funny.  He was eventually fired.  But I don’t think it was poop-related.  I believe he failed a drug test.

Several businesses said they had no choice but to respond to the influx of protesters by closing bathrooms.

Mike Keane, who owns O’Hara’s Restaurant and Pub, said that theft of bathroom soap and toilet paper had skyrocketed and that one protester used the bathroom but failed to properly use the toilet.

Both Ms. Tzortzatos, owner of Panini & Co., and Mr. Keane said that the protesters rarely bought anything, yet hurled curses when they were told that only paying customers could use their bathrooms.

Steve Zamfotis, manager of another nearby store, Steve’s Pizza, said: “They are pests. They go to the bathroom and don’t even buy a cup of coffee.”

Mr. Zamfotis said he closed his bathroom after it repeatedly flooded from protesters’ bathing there.

Stealing toilet paper?  That would explain some of the unacceptable sanitary conditions in the park.

Speaking of poop, this reminds me of another poop anecdote.  The same guy who told me about that construction worker had some port-a-johns on job site.  Apparently he pissed off some workers.  After which they, too, didn’t use the toilet facilities properly.  They didn’t lift the lids.  They just pooped on them.  Some people protest in strange and mysterious ways.  Which is what I’m guessing happened here.  Either on the toilet seat.  Or, perhaps, on the floor.  And that reminds me of yet another poop anecdote.  I knew a lawyer who did that once.  He was angry at his landlord.  So he pooped in the stairwell.  I guess that showed her.  Just like these protestors showed this restaurant owner.

Kira Annika, a spokeswoman for the protesters, wrote in an e-mail that she had not heard of such complaints. “We were under the impression that the local business community appreciated our patronage and the attention that we give them,” she wrote.

Still, in a widely distributed pamphlet, “Welcome To Liberty Plaza: Home of Occupy Wall Street,” participants were given explicit instructions on where to find relief.

“After you’ve dined,” the pamphlet reads, “feel free to refresh yourself in the restrooms of neighboring businesses like Burger King and McDonalds without feeling obligated to buy anything.”

A manager of the Burger King in question said he had no trouble with the protesters, though a maintenance worker at the McDonald’s, Deon Cook, said that in recent days he had been forced to clean the bathroom every five minutes.

How generous they are with other people’s private property.  The mark of a true liberal.  I’m sure they would be just as generous with their own private property.  And welcome strangers into their homes to use their toilets.

Yves Delva, a manager at a nearby Modell’s Sporting Goods, said sales had been brisk for sleeping bags, sweatshirts, hand warmers sweatpants and goggles — that last item presumably bought to protect the eyes from pepper spray, which has been used by police officers in response to the demonstrations. “We’ve been profiting,” Mr. Delva said.

Well this is strange.  This is capitalism.  And these are products of corporations.  I guess they’ll surrender their principles when it gets cold and wet.  Probably even be willing to go back to their parent’s house.  To a warm, dry bed.  And heat.  Once the temperatures fall.  And the rainy season sets in.  One thing for sure.  They ain’t the protestors their parents were.

The Problem with the Occupy Wall Street people is that they are not more Tea Party-Like

And it’s just not me saying this.  Even one of their supporters says this (see Tea Party Lessons for the Left by Michael Tomasky posted 10/4/2011 on Yahoo! News).

But now comes Occupy Wall Street. Is the cosmic score about to be evened? Maybe. But paradoxically, only if this new left protest movement embraces some crucial lessons from the Tea Party movement—and if it outgrows certain impulses from 1968 that continue to loom large in the left’s imagination.

… To succeed, it would have to model itself on 1963, not 1968. And I’m not confident that any left-wing protest movement today can understand that.

What do I mean? In 1963, we had the March on Washington. No one threw anything. There were no drum circles. The protesters of 1963 said to America, “We are like you; in fact, we are you.”…The protesters of 1968 said to America, “We are not like you; in fact, we hate you…”

What changed, between 1963 and 1968? This: In 1963, protest was undertaken for the purpose of winning. By 1968, protest became a carnival of self-expression. Winning was the stated goal, but deep down, emotionally, it wasn’t really the goal: sticking it to the man was. Imagine that the SCLC-led protesters of 1963 had indulged in self-expression, and ask yourself whether they would have succeeded. I think I need say no more on that.

So these protesters are getting it wrong.  They’re protesting for the fun of protesting.  Not for some deep underlying philosophical principle.  It appears you can summarize all of their grievances and demands with one word.  PARTY!  Sort of the way it was in 1968.  I guess.

And this is where today’s protesters need to steal a page from the Tea Party activists. I beg, plead, implore, importune: Get some spokespeople out there for the cause who are just regular Americans…

The genius of the Tea Party movement lies entirely in the fact that its public faces were, by and large, regular Americans. How many stories did we all read about the homemaker from Wilkes-Barre and the IT guy from Dubuque who’d never been involved in politics in their lives and never thought they would be until the Tea Party came along? These people resonate with other Americans: “She’s my neighbor; he’s just like me.” That gave the Tea Party movement incredible force and made the media take it seriously, and making the media take you seriously is, alas, at least half the battle in our age.

The OWS movement is part of the way there. The “We Are the 99 Percent” trope is powerful. It is true. But the movement has to prove that it really is the 99 percent. It has to win middle America, and the way to win middle America is to be middle America. For all the Seattle-ish longhairs down in Zucotti Park—whom the mainstream media and the right wing will undoubtedly highlight—there are, to be sure, homemakers in Wilkes-Barre and IT guys in Dubuque who sympathize. Find them. Put them out there. Get them on cable.

So if I understand this correctly, the problem with the answer to the Tea Party, the Occupy Wall Street people, is that they are not more Tea Party-like.  They’re not as polite.  As law abiding.  As clean.  As respectable (you don’t see many bare-breasted women dancing at Tea Party events).  So they need to be more like this.  And less like themselves.  More like respectable grownups.  And less like overindulgent children.  Who have but one thing on their mind.  PARTY!

The Tea Party Respects the Rule of Law and Private Property Rights

Occupy Wall Street is not the Tea Party.  For the Tea Party is interested in the Rule of Law.  The Constitution.  They are concerned that the nation is drifting too far away from the intent of the Founding Fathers.  Those guiding principles that have made the United States that shining city upon the hill.  The ultimate destination for emigrants everywhere.  Whereas the Occupy Wall Street People want bigger government and more free stuff.  And, of course, they want to do one other thing.  PARTY (see The Left’s Pathetic Tea Party by Rich Lowry posted 10/4/2011 on National Review Online)!

In the Occupy Wall Street movement, the Left thinks it might have found its own tea party…

This is a sign either of desperation to find anyone on the left still energized after three years of Hope and Change, or of a lack of standards, or both. The Left’s tea party is a juvenile rabble, a woolly-headed horde that has been laboring to come up with one concrete demand on the basis of its — in the words of one sympathetic writer — “horizontal, autonomous, leaderless, modified-consensus-based system with roots in anarchist thought.”

The Right’s tea party had its signature event at a rally at the Lincoln Memorial where everyone listened politely to patriotic exhortations and picked up their trash and went home. The Left’s tea party closed down a major thoroughfare in New York City — the Brooklyn Bridge — and saw its members arrested in the hundreds.

The Tea Party respects the Rule of Law.  And private property rights.  That’s why they’re not pigs when visiting other people’s property.  They don’t poop and pee wherever they want.  Disrupt traffic.  Or get arrested.  I mean, if you had to have either the Tea Party people or the Occupy Wall Street people be your next door neighbor, who would you choose?

What was remarkable about the Right’s tea party is that it depended on solid burghers who typically don’t have the time or inclination to protest anything. Occupy Wall Street is a project of people who do little besides protest. It’s all down to a standard operating procedure: the guitars, the drums, the street theater, the age-old chants…

The New York Times quoted one Occupy Wall Street veteran telling a newcomer: “It doesn’t matter what you’re protesting. Just protest.” That captures the coherence of the exercise, which is a giant, ideologically charged, post-adolescent sleepover complete with face paint and pizza deliveries.

Again, I think we can sum up their grievances and demands with one word.  PARTY!

Now it’s Time for Them to Stop Thinking about Themselves and Just go Home

There’s an expression that goes like this.  Don’t sh*t where you eat.  A vulgar expression, yes, but it’s kind of apropos.  It means you don’t have sex with someone at work.  Because if the relationship goes sour, as they almost always do when you fool around at work, it can become very awkward around each other after the break up.  Which can be very unpleasant.  And strain the working relationship.

Now the ‘having a job’ part of this analogy has nothing to do with the Occupy Wall Street people.  It’s more of a literal meaning.  If you’re trying to win the hearts and minds of the people around you, well, you can’t go pooping all over their private property.  Nothing says ‘I hate you more’ than an unwelcomed poop.  And strains the solidarity relationship.

Of course, these indiscriminate poopers don’t care about anyone but themselves.  They protest not for an overriding principle.  But to get free stuff for themselves.  And, of course, to PARTY!  That’s why they have long overstayed their welcome in this neighborhood.  Now it’s time for them to stop thinking about themselves.  And just go home.

www.PITHOCRATES.com

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