2012 Endorsements: George Washington

Posted by PITHOCRATES - October 16th, 2012

2012 Election

At first the Six Nations feared the French taking their Land more than the British

George Washington entered the history books when he entered the Ohio Country.  Where the French and the British were claiming the same land in North America.  While his contemporaries went to college Washington went to war.  Over the Blue Ridge Mountains.  In the harsh frontier lands of the Ohio Country.  Fighting for the British against Britain’s archenemy.  France.  Who had seized a half-built fort near the junction of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers.  Renamed it Fort Duquesne.  And proceeded to turn the surrounding area French.  Until, that is, Washington arrived on the scene.

It is much debated about what happened when the British fell upon a French force outside of Fort Duquesne.  Especially who fired first.  Or what happened after the French surrendered.  The French commander, Joseph Coulon de Villiers, sieur de Jumonville, was wounded.  And as he explained he was on a diplomatic mission to deliver a message to the British Washington’s Indian ally, Tanacharison, who was the diplomatic representative of the Six Nations (Iroquois Confederation), brutally murdered Jumonville while he was explaining his diplomatic mission.  Tanacharison spoke fluent French.  And had apparently heard enough.  For he feared the French taking their land more than the British at that time.

So this international incident brought war once again between the French and the British.  The Seven Year’s War as they called it in Europe.  Or the French and Indian War as they called it in British North America.  Even though the British also had Indian allies.  There were more French in the area.  So Washington built a fort to wait for their counter attack.  Fort Necessity.  The French came.  And after a brutal fight the British surrendered.  The Articles of Capitulation Washington signed included the word ‘assassination’.  Of Joseph Coulon de Villiers, sieur de Jumonville.  Washington later claimed the document was poorly translated from French and that he did not know he was admitting to assassinating a French diplomat.  Whether he did or not it put the blame of the French and Indian War on the British.  Not a very auspicious start for America’s indispensible Founding Father.

Washington felt that the British looked down on him and his Fellow Americans

The British came up with a bold plan to remove the French from North America.  By marching into the Ohio Country.  And taking Fort Duquesne.  Then capturing the forts along the Great Lakes.  And then capturing French Canada.  A bold plan.  Executed by a very experienced general.  Edward Braddock.  A veteran of European battles.  But without a clue of what it was like fighting in the American wilderness.  He had at his disposal the largest military force ever assembled in America.  Equipped with the finest arms.  So confident of victory he told the Indians that were friendly to the British that he didn’t need their help.  And that he was going to take all their land for the British Crown.  Making most switch sides and fight alongside the French against the British.

Washington requested to join General Braddock.  Hoping to get a good military career out of this great military expedition.  And a commission in the British Army.  Braddock took him along.  But disaster fell upon the expedition.  A force of French and Indians fell onto the lumbering column and attacked.  The British regulars formed into ranks as they would on any European battlefield.  And were shot down in droves.  Then broke and ran.  Braddock fell mortally wounded.  Washington then took command and rallied the troops and made an orderly retreat.  While having two horses shot out beneath him.  And four musket ball holes in his jacket.  But he didn’t suffer a scratch.  Washington learned a lesson that day.  You didn’t win battles in the American wilderness with European tactics.  No matter how superior you numbers and arms.

He never would receive that British commission.  Feeling in part that the British looked down on him and his fellow Americans.  They may have been part of the British Empire.  But they were not truly British.  Which made it difficult for Washington to respect his British superiors.  In fact, though he was a good soldier who followed orders he often felt superior to his superiors.  And preferred giving orders.  With the future of a British commission not in the cards he retired from the army.  Married Martha Dandridge Custis.  Thanks to her wealth he became one of the wealthiest men in Virginia.  As well as becoming one of the more successful planters in Virginia.  He had wealth (through his marriage to Martha).  Land.  And leisure time.  He lived the good life.  And spent the money.  And why not?  He married into great wealth.  And had vast land holdings earning wealth.  Life was good.

If George Washington were around Today he would Likely Endorse Republicans Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan

He bought the finest things from London from Robert Cary.  Who ran London’s largest mercantile houses.  Cary & Company.  Washington also sold his tobacco crop to Cary.  And early on he complained about the price he was getting for his tobacco.  And all the charges on his invoices.  But he had even bigger problems.  He was spending more than he was earning.  With the balance due coming from the wealth he got from his marriage.  Worse, his account at Cary & Company was in arrears.  The price for those fine things continued to go up while the price he was getting for his tobacco did not.  He didn’t trust Cary.  But he recognized the real problem was tobacco.  And mercantilism.  Where American colonists sent raw material to the mother country.  And bought finished goods from the mother country with the proceeds.  Making the planters dependent on people like Robert Cary.  Well, after this revelation Washington made some changes.  He planted wheat instead of tobacco.  Wheat he ground into flour in his own mill.  Which he sold locally.  Without going through Cary.  He built a ship to fish the Potomac.  And bought a ship to transport his goods to markets in the Caribbean.  Even all the way to Europe.  He set up a small textile shop to produce linen and wool fabric.  These changes helped Washington return to profitability.  Unlike some of his fellow planters.  Like Thomas Jefferson.  Who would die in debt.

Washington was an astute business man.  Who did not like being controlled by men in faraway places.  Around this time Parliament passed the Stamp Act to raise revenue to help pay the costs of the British Empire.  While he agreed with his fellow colonists that this was taxation without representation he did see something good in it.  The higher tax would reduce British imports.  As Americans gave up on British luxuries and provided for their own needs.  Which would help the Americans get away from the control of people in faraway places.  Something he was more and more interested in.  Economic independence.  Then came the Royal Proclamation of 1763.  Which shut off the Ohio Country to American settlers.  To ostensibly keep the peace with the Indians on the frontier.  Which stung Washington particularly hard.  Having helped to defeat the French to clear them from the Ohio Country King George was now denying this land to those who won it.  Still, they did promise to give some land to the veterans who fought there.  As long as they were a veteran of the British Army.  Yet another British slight directed at Washington.  And evidence of British cronyism when it came to the rule of the American colonies.  Then came the Intolerable Acts.  The Quebec Act.  The Townshend Acts.  Further encroachments by men in faraway places.  Washington had had enough.  And joined those demanding independence from Great Britain.

So if George Washington were around today who would he endorse in the 2012 election?  Well, he would not like the party that wanted to reach further into business affairs from faraway places.  Or that raised taxes and increased the regulations on business.  Or one that elevated the state over businesses.  Where the government picks winners and losers in the market place.  Like the mercantilism of old.  He would not like the smug, elitist politicians who know better than we do.  And change things in our lives to what they perceive as being for our own good.   Such as telling us what cars to drive or what fuels to use to make our electric power.  He would not like the massive spending.  Or the debt it gave us.  As his brief brush with inundating debt shook him to his core.  Making him turn away from the governing powers, returning to his rugged individualism of his days in the Ohio Country.  And so on.  Clearly the party he would not endorse would be the Democrat Party with their oppressive rules and regulations and their nanny state.  So it is likely that if he were around today he would endorse the Republican ticket of Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan.

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