Aging Populations and State-Provided Health Care will Stress State Systems to Collapse

Posted by PITHOCRATES - June 16th, 2013

Week in Review

When people provided their own health care and retirement nest eggs it didn’t matter if the population was aging or getting younger.  For each person planned to take care of him or herself.  But when the government took over health care and retirement nest eggs the age of the population began to matter.  For when the state provides these benefits they have to pay for them via taxes.  And if the population is aging that is a big problem.  Because more people are leaving the workforce and consuming health care and pension benefits than there are entering the workforce to pay for them.

Which means the government has to increase tax rates on those paying for these benefits.  And when people are living longer into retirement it really throws a wrench into the state’s plans.  For it is requiring a level of taxation that simply isn’t possible.  And this is exactly what the baby boom generation is doing to advanced welfare states throughout the world.  It’s causing greater governmental expenditures.  Resulting in larger budget deficits.  And financial crises (see Our aging population set to put a heavy toll on our systems, and we’re not ready by Simon Kent and Shawn Jeffords posted 6/14/2013 on the Toronto Sun).

The first baby boomers began turning 65 in 2012, and by 2036, one out of every four of our neighbours will be elderly…

“We don’t have a health care system in Canada, we have an acute care system,” [Sharon] Carstairs [former senator and was the first woman to lead an opposition party in Canada] after becoming Manitoba’s Liberal leader in the ’80stold QMI Agency.

The very sick are cared for well but we don’t do a good job of keeping others at home and out hospitals and high-cost facilities.

“We’re using acute care hospital beds to hold thousands of Canadians who should be in long-term care or home care,” she says…

Canada has a “little bit of breathing space” for preparations to cope with aging boomers, but not much, suggests University of Toronto professor emeritus David Foot, one of the country’s most respected demographers.

“We need to get this right to prepare for that boomer onslaught,” Foot says. “We can have an excellent system if we choose to.”

Zero hour is 2027.

“The first boomer born in 1947 reaches 80 in 2027,” Foot says.

That’s when the critical mass, the largest bulge of the baby boom, approaches 80 and will require the most care of their lives…

Canada needs to train gerontologists, therapists, psychiatrists, palliative care nurses and specialists, replace the workforce of aging nurses and the army of some 3 million volunteers who currently provide the bulk of in-home care to seniors, say experts…

“The sheer number of baby boomers that will be drawing on the system will magnify and put pressures on the systems that has not been felt before,” he says.

Both the United States and Canada have aging populations.  And a baby boomer bulge coming down the pike.  It will make it very difficult in Canada.  And far worse in the United States.  For they have about 9-times the population of Canada.  And will have 9-times the baby boomer bulge.  Making it a very poor time for the state to take over more pension and health care spending obligations.  Which is exactly what the Americans did by passing Obamacare into law.

The United States is already suffering record trillion dollar deficits.  By the time Obamacare pays to train gerontologists, therapists, psychiatrists, palliative care nurses, specialists, etc., and builds nursing homes to handle the baby boomer bulge the deficit will soar even higher.  Unless there really are death panels in Obamacare.  Which may be the only way not to break the fiscal back of the nation.  Well, there’s that.  Or they could let people provide their own health care and retirement nest eggs like they once did.  And then the age of the population would be irrelevant.  For it basically comes down to these two options.  Either we pay for our own health care and retirement.  Or the government will have to figure out how to cut costs.  And how do you do that when the largest cost is caring for the very old and the very sick?  In a word, death panels.  Well, two words, actually.

Welcome to the brave new world of Obamacare.

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