Email, Texting and Online Bill Paying is doing to Canada Post what it did to the USPS

Posted by PITHOCRATES - January 19th, 2014

Week in Review

The United States Postal Service (USPS) is going broke.  Thanks to email, texting and online bill paying.  Making the USPS more and more irrelevant these days.  And it’s not just the USPS having this problem (see Ontario mother with sick child urges Canada Post to keep door-to-door delivery by The Canadian Press posted 1/13/2014 on City News Toronto).

An online petition urging Canada Post to reconsider its decision to end door-to-door delivery in urban centres has garnered more than 120,000 signatures…

Canada Post announced some dramatic changes to its operations last month, including plans to phase out the age-old tradition of home delivery in urban areas. The company said that without postal carriers travelling by foot, it would save a significant amount of money…

The petition — posted on the website change.org — draws attention to anyone in Canada who has limited mobility, such as the elderly or disabled, and the possibly dangerous effects this change could have on their lives…

Hamilton said that Canada Post is trying to maintain service to all Canadians but that they need to find innovative ways to do it in order to remain self-sufficient.

Canada Post had projected an annual loss of $1 billion dollars a year by 2020 if they were to continue with the door-to-door delivery.

Part of the reason why Canada can’t afford to keep urban delivery is because they have single-payer health care.  Which is pretty costly.  Especially with Canada having what all advanced economies have.  An aging population.  Which means more people are leaving the workforce and consuming taxpayer benefits than there are people entering the workforce paying taxes.  And with better health care people are living longer into retirement.  Which forces tax rates higher on the working (i.e., the young and healthy) to pay for those not working.

It is interesting that the same people, the young and healthy, are the ones destroying Canadian Post.  For they’re the ones emailing, texting and paying bills online.  Which means they will have to raise taxes further on the young and healthy to support the older generation.  Transferring more and more costs from the old to the young.  Which is what happens in a socialist country.  Generational theft.  Costs keep rising so people have smaller families.  Causing the population to age.  And requiring ever higher tax rates on those in the workforce to pay for the growing numbers who have left the workforce.

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The Cruel March of Technology now has the USPS in its Crosshairs

Posted by PITHOCRATES - August 3rd, 2013

Week in Review

The United States is not the only country trying to figure out what to do with a dated institution long past its prime that few people use these days.  Something that was a large part of our parents’ lives.  But becoming more and more meaningless to the younger generations.   The Postal Service (see Canada Post needs to reduce home delivery by Daniel Fontaine posted 7/31/2013 on Vancouver 24 hrs).

The reality today is tech-savvy Canadians are no longer enamoured with their postal service, nor do they rely upon it to operate their daily lives. Thanks to online banking, e-mail, scanners and texting, Canada Post and its costly, outdated service look ancient by comparison…

Today, door-to-door mail service in many rural or even less-populated urban areas is no longer an option. Canada Post abandoned the front-door policy in new subdivisions, instead favouring group mailboxes…

… would it really impact those getting home delivery if they received their mail only twice a week? I doubt it would make a whit of difference — except perhaps to the bottom line of Canada Post. Reducing home delivery means paying fewer postal workers and a more efficient operation…

But don’t expect the public-sector unions and a majority of home-delivery recipients to let daily mail service go without a fight, even if the business case no longer exists to maintain this costly level of service.

The United States Postal Service (USPS) has been on life-support for a long time.  First it was email.  Then ecommerce.  Then online bill paying.  Then texting.  With FedEx and UPS delivering the things we buy on line with our tablets and smartphones what’s left for the USPS?  Besides junk mail?  Even the Social Security Administration uses e-banking.  The volume of mail has fallen so far that they cannot raise stamp prices high enough to cover their operating costs and fund their pension plan.  Unless they can get people to mail a postcard for $57.  Or more.

There used to be video stores all over the place.  As renting videotapes was a booming business at one time.  But the same reasons that have made the USPS obsolete have made the video store obsolete.  There are still a few around.  But it is hard to compete with vending machines renting movies at the grocery store.  And watching them over the Internet.  Where they can charge less as they don’t have the costs of a brick and mortar store to pay for.  And this is the problem the USPS has.  There are less costly and faster alternatives available.  Why pay to mail a letter that will take days to travel to the recipient when you can email something for free that arrives seconds after sending?  Even the video stores don’t have competition that bad.

Remember receiving a telegram?  Probably not.  Something else that has long since fallen by the wayside.  The telephone put that to rest.  Today people can call with bad news.  They don’t have to send a telegram.  Putting a lot of telegram deliverers out of a job.  But life went on.

So perhaps it’s time to pull the plug on the USPS.  Or greatly reduce the service.  Maybe twice a week.  For let’s face it, nothing good comes in the mail these days anyway.  Bills, junk mail and jury duty summons.  Things we just won’t mind waiting an extra week to get.

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Email and Electronic Bill Paying as well as Retiree Benefits are Bankrupting the U.S. Postal Service

Posted by PITHOCRATES - February 10th, 2013

Week in Review

The United States is not the only country having trouble with their postal service.  Email and electronic bill paying have taken away a huge source of revenue for the postal service in the US.  As well as in the UK (see Post Office will shut one in five branches after ‘losing £40m a year’ by Anna Edwards posted 2/7/2013 pm the Daily Mail).

The Post Office said they were losing £40 million [$63 million US] a year, so it was seeking retail partners for 70 branches, enabling them to stay in their current locations…

CWU general secretary Billy Hayes said the announcement was a ‘huge blow’ to the Post Office network, saying: ‘Staff will be in shock at the scale of what will effectively be the closures of Crown post offices across the country.

‘This move will have a huge impact on the high streets of small towns earmarked to lose their Crown post office.

‘These offices provide a dedicated specialist service to communities which will not be replicated by a window or two in a bigger shop…

‘It leaves huge questions about the future of the Post Office – how can it realistically deliver services for passport applications, identity services and a range of financial services while being dramatically pruned back? What does it mean for Metropolitan Police plans to move into London post offices?’

Robert Hammond, of Consumer Focus, said: ‘The Post Office network must change if it is to be sustainable.

‘These changes to Crown post offices are part of the biggest-ever programme of change to the network and consumers will want to see Post Office services that are high-quality and accessible, and offer the products and services they need. This is more important than the issue of who operates the post office itself.

People are using Royal Mail less in the UK.  So to save the postal service the UK is taking drastic action.  Basically privatizing as much of it as they can.  By partnering with other retail outlets that can cut the overhead cost of standalone post offices.  Some people may not be happy about these developments.  But it’s their own fault for using email.  And paying their bills online.  If they want to keep the postal service this may be their only chance.  Something the Americans should consider.  Based on the money they’re losing (see Postal Service loses less, but still in trouble by Jennifer Liberto posted 2/8/2013 on CNN Money).

In the three months ended Dec. 31, the agency lost $1.3 billion — considerably less than the $3.3 billion lost in the year-earlier period.

The service was hurt as the volume of first-class mail, which most consumers use to pay bills and stay in touch, decreased by 4.5.%, said USPS chief financial officer Joseph Corbett. But it got help as shipping and package volume for the busy holiday season increased 4% compared to the prior year.

Still, the service is in trouble. The key culprit remains a 2006 congressional mandate, under which it has to pre-fund healthcare benefits for future retirees. The USPS has been borrowing billions of dollars from taxpayers to make up for the shortfalls…

The Postal Service on Wednesday unveiled a plan to end Saturday delivery of mail, a move which is expected to save $2 billion a year, a drop in the bucket compared to the $16 billion loss the organization reported for 2012.

The US has about 5-times the population of the UK.  So if we multiplied their losses (in US dollars) by 5 it comes to $316 million.  A far cry from the $16 BILLION lost in 2012.  The U.S. Postal Service has a far greater crisis on its hands than the Royal Mail.  And it goes to that unfunded retiree health care plan that the U.S. government is now forcing them to fund.  Compounding the problem of email and electronic bill paying.

Employers who provide retiree pensions and health care benefits are supposed to put money aside for their current workers’ retirement.  In accounting terminology, this retirement expense should be expensed on the income statement (lowering profits) with a credit going to the balance sheet to show the money owed.  A liability.  When a person retires and starts incurring retirement costs the employer pays for these and debits that liability account.  Reducing it.  And credits a cash account.  Reducing it.  When an employer pays a retiree it should be entirely a balance sheet transaction.  Completely off the income statement.  With no impact on profitability.  This payment should reduce their cash balances.  As well as their liability account for retirees.  For as they pay their retirees it reduces what they owe their retirees.

The U.S. Postal Service didn’t do this.  They simply paid and expensed these retirement benefits as they incurred them.  Greatly understating their retirees’ costs.  And overstating their profitability.  Leaving a massive unfunded retiree health care liability.  Funding this massive unfunded liability is bankrupting the U.S. Postal Service.  Or rather these massive retiree costs they were hiding off the books are now bankrupting the U.S. Postal Service.  Unions want to go back to NOT funding these retirement costs.  And have the U.S. taxpayer bail them out.  Just like they bailed out the UAW retirement plans when GM and Chrysler went bankrupt.

The U.S. needs not only to privatize portions of the U.S. Postal Service like the UK they also need to privatize pensions and health care plans.  Like most businesses have.  Give employees money to put away for their own retirement needs.  For the old ways just don’t work anymore.

Funny how progressives hate all of the other old ways.  Like thrift, going to church, waiting until marriage before having sex, etc.  But pensions?  Retiree health care benefits?  No, when it comes to these things they’re all for going back to the Fifties.

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Public School Teachers and Public Sector Workers have Secret Millionaire Retirements

Posted by PITHOCRATES - January 6th, 2013

Week in Review

President Obama stood firm during the fiscal cliff debate to raise taxes on the millionaires and billionaires.  To get those who can afford it to pay a little more.  The visible millionaires.  To help pay for the secret millionaires.  Public school teachers.  And public sector employees (see Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers by Randall Hoven posted 12/10/2012 on American Thinker).

Our President likes to use the phrase “millionaires and billionaires.” A person whose net worth is $1 million or more is a “millionaire.”

Most of us working stiffs have trouble thinking in terms of net worth; we are more used to the concept of annual salary. How does net worth translate into annual income, or vice versa? In round numbers, the annual income equivalent is 4% of an investment nest egg. So if you have $1 million socked away, consider that to be equal to $40,000 income every year…

That relationship can be turned around: if you have an annual pension of $40,000, you are effectively a millionaire, especially if that pension is adjusted for cost of living…

Now let’s look at public school teachers. In Illinois, where I live, the Illinois State Board of Education puts out a report on teachers’ salaries. The table below is a pretty good summary of that 110-page report. A beginning teacher with a Bachelor’s degree in a median school district might make about $40,000 per year. But by the time a teacher retires, she could be making $55,000 to $120,000, depending on how much graduate education she got and her school district.

And when that teacher does retire, what is her pension? If most school districts are like Chicago’s, the teacher will make about 50% of her final salary if she retires at age 55, or 75%, the maximum, if she waits until age 59…

In short, a lot of retired Illinois teachers are millionaires.

But that’s not all. Teachers who retired from the Chicago school district get 60% of their health insurance premiums subsidized. In round numbers, let’s call that a value of $8,000 per year.

Also, the above values do not include any other savings or investments made over the teachers’ careers, including home values. If they have their own 401k’s in addition to their pensions, those were not included. Social Security was not included either.

Wait, there’s more. These pensions are for life. Many or most of them are also adjusted for cost of living. Every month, for the rest of their lives, retired teachers get checks or automatic deposits of a reliable amount, indexed for inflation and guaranteed by the government. They don’t have to worry about investment risks…

The situation of the retired public school teacher is also not that much different from fire fighters, policemen, postal workers and other public employees. Nor is it that much different from a lot of other retired workers, especially union members such as General Motors retirees. If such people are getting pensions and benefits of $40,000 per year or more, not an exceptional amount, they are millionaires…

The main reason the US Post Office, the federal government and many state and local governments face unsustainable debt, bankruptcy and default is due to the costs of public employee pensions. GM went bankrupt largely due to the costs of its retirees’ pensions and benefits.

Businesses go bankrupt, governments face default and economic growth slows to a near standstill. Meanwhile, retired public school teachers, who had to work 9 months of the year during their careers, now pull in checks 12 months a year, indexed for inflation and guaranteed by the government, in amounts that often make them millionaires, maybe twice over.

So public school teachers, fire fighters, police officers, postal workers and other public employees are not the same as people who work in the private sector.  For when people retire from middle class jobs in the private sector they don’t live a long retirement like a millionaire.  They live a shorter life in retirement worrying that they may outlive their retirement savings.  Or that some illness may wipe out their retirement savings.  Forcing them to return to work in the last remaining years of their life.  Something school teachers, fire fighters, police officers, postal workers and other public employees don’t have to worry about.  As long as they can maintain a privileged class in America.  An American aristocracy, if you will.  The thing we fought the Revolutionary War to put an end to in the New World.  Old World aristocracy.

Not everyone can live like this.  For there just isn’t enough taxpayer income to tax away to pay for everyone.  Which is why the aristocracy is a privileged class.  In a ‘classless’ America.  A class that attacks rich people to pay their fair share.  So they can enjoy their millionaire retirements.  Without having the talent or ability of an entrepreneur.  The investment savvy of a Mitt Romney.  Or simply not having been lucky enough to be born into an aristocratic family.  Like a Kennedy.

And if you think these millionaire retirees have earned their good life like an entrepreneur, consider how hard they have to work for their Masters Degree.

You might notice from the table of teacher salaries that a Masters Degree with extra graduate hours can add $20,000 or more to a teacher’s annual salary. Just for fun I want to show you two course descriptions. The first one happens to describe an engineering course I teach which is for undergraduates, required of all engineering students and generally taken in a student’s 2nd or 3rd year of college.

 Engineering Mathematics: The Laplace transform and applications; series solutions of differential equations, Bessel´s equation, Legendre´s equation, special functions; matrices, eigenvalues, and eigenfunctions; vector analysis and applications; boundary value problems and spectral representations; Fourier series and Fourier integrals; solution of partial differential equations of mathematical physics.

This second course description is taken from the University of Missouri St. Louis bulletin. It describes a graduate level course in the Education school.

 The Educational Role of Play: Emphasizes play as a constructive process with applications to cognitive and social development. Special attention to facilitating play in early childhood classrooms.

Note that the first course description (the one with all of that math) was an undergraduate course.  While the second course description (all about having fun) is a graduate course in the school of education.  The person learning about fun in the classroom will live like a millionaire in their retirement.  While the odds are that the one that worked so hard to learn all of that math to help create the wonderful things in our high-tech economy will not.  Why?  Because brilliant engineers have to earn their retirement.  While the privilege class makes the engineers and other hard working Americans pay for their millionaire retirement.  Is that fair?  According to the Left, yes.

Worse, these are the people teaching our children.  This privileged class that exploits the taxpayer so they can live a longer and more comfortable retirement are teaching our kids the evils of capitalism.  To turn them into Democrat voters.  So they vote for the party that attacks those who earn their wealth.  To make them pay their fair share.  So these teachers and public sector workers can continue to live their millionaire retirements.  While most of their student’s parents struggle in their own lives because they’re paying so much in taxes to support the better lives of their children’s teachers.

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Even Cutting 28,000 Jobs will not help the USPS Compete against the Internet

Posted by PITHOCRATES - May 27th, 2012

Week in Review

The United States Postal Service (USPS) hates the Internet.  Before the Internet they had a monopoly in the letter industry.  If you wanted to send Granny a letter you had to go through them.  There’s only one problem with a monopoly.  Because they have a captive audience they don’t have to innovate.  They don’t have to improve anything.  Just make a lot of money.  And give your employees generous wage and benefit packages.  Just like the railroads did.  Before trucks came around, that is.  The trucking industry nearly destroyed the railroad industry.  But the railroads learned how to compete.  They helped redefine the transportation industry that now includes trains, ships and trucks.  The railroads are back.  Stronger than ever.  And making money.  But is it too late for the USPS?

The Internet is the USPS’ trucking industry.  It has all but destroyed the snail mail industry.  To survive the USPS has to do what the railroads did.  Reinvent itself.  Reinvent the industry they participate in.  If they can.  And they better hurry.  Because their monopoly is gone.  Not from other people entering the snail mail business.  But by new technology that created a better alternative to the snail mail business.  The Internet.  And it’s tap-dancing all over the USPS (see U.S. Postal Service offers buyouts to 45,000 workers by Emily Stephenson posted 5/25/2012 on Reuters).

The mail agency, which lost $3.2 billion in the first three months of 2012, plans to begin this summer moving mail-processing activities away from smaller sites to reduce annual costs.

As part of that plan, the Postal Service will offer $15,000 in two installments to full-time mail handlers who take early retirement or leave the agency, USPS spokesman Mark Saunders said on Friday…

The Postal Service has been hit hard by tumbling mail volumes as more Americans communicate online and by massive payments for future retiree health benefits…

The agency needs to reduce its workforce by 150,000 people by 2015, Saunders said. Consolidating and closing processing facilities, which will continue through 2014, could eliminate up to 28,000 jobs and save $2.1 billion a year, the Postal Service has said.

Saunders said he could not speculate how many mail handlers would take buyouts this year, but added that the change “will not affect mail service.”

It’s not enough.  If you annualize that $3.2 billion quarterly loss that comes to a $12.8 billion loss for the year (4 X $3.2 billion).  Cutting only $2.1 billion per year will not solve their problems.  They’ll still have an operating deficit of approximately $9.6 billion.  And if the Internet doesn’t go out of business in the foreseeable future these numbers are only going to get worse.

It’s pretty interesting that a company can cut 28,000 jobs without affecting its business operations.  Why, it’s almost as if they never shrunk their labor force all these years that their business has shrunk.  It’s as if 28,000 people have just been sitting around waiting for the work to pick up again.  While collecting a paycheck.  And while the USPS pours billions into a pension plan for their future retirement.  Hmm.  I wonder if this could have anything to do with that $3.2 billion quarterly loss. 

The clock is ticking.  While the USPS is still struggling to compete with email texting is giving email a run for its money.  And it just may be that the USPS is not as nimble as the railroad industry in pulling up its tracks and laying them on the road to profitability.

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The U.S. Postal Service is One of the Biggest and Least Successful Companies of All Time

Posted by PITHOCRATES - May 5th, 2012

Week in Review

The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) may not be part of the government.  But it sure acts like it is (see As a private firm the US Postal Service would rank 35th on the Fortune 500 list, but it would also be bankrupt posted 5/5/2012 on The Economist).

AT THE bottom of its press releases the US Postal Service brags that if it were a private company, it would rank 35th on the Fortune 500 list. Were it a private firm, it would also be bankrupt. The service loses $25m a day.

Hit hard by the recession and the march towards electronic mail, the Postal Service is in desperate need of reform…

A normal business could not operate like this. Over three-quarters of America’s post offices do not make a profit. Take, for example, the office in Alix, Arkansas, which last year cost $48,452 to run and brought in just $3,642 in revenue. Its earnings may be thinned by the presence of eight other post offices in an 11-mile radius. Under the Senate bill, the Alix office would remain open…

A more pressing concern for the service involves payments into a health-benefits fund for the future retired…

The focus will now shift to the House, which is considering a postal-reform bill of its own. Its author, Darrell Issa, a Republican from California, plans to end Saturday delivery and establish a financial-control board with a mandate to cut costs. His bill would take politics out of the process by creating an independent commission to oversee the closure of post offices. And it would aim to bring the pay of postal employees into line with the private sector.

The solution is easy to some.  Get rid of email.  Text messaging.  And paying your bills online.  That’s the solution they’ve used elsewhere in the economy to protect a dying industry from a higher quality, lower cost competitor.  They used tariffs to protect the U.S. automotive industry.  And as a result they have lost all but a fraction of the global market.  They’ve passed labor laws favoring higher cost union labor.  And chased manufacturers out of the country.  The Labor Department sued Boeing for building a new 787 Dreamliner plant in a nonunion state.  Because they wanted those planes to be built with costlier union labor.  Making them less competitive with Airbus.  Who continues to expand their market share.  So why not get rid of email?  It would be no more foolish than past solutions.

Of course, they can’t do that.  Too many young people enjoy emailing and texting.  And everything else in the digital world.  They can increase the price of a car or a plane ticket without it affecting your every waking moment.  You can’t do that with the Internet.  For the American youth have a fever.  And the only prescription is more Internet access.  Or more cowbell.  And if you take that away to save something they don’t use that will come back to bite them in the buttocks in the first election following that action.  And that’s a problem.  Because the youth don’t care about past institutions or economics.  Their world is centered on them.  And if you mess with their immediate pleasures in life they will punish you at the polls.

So the solution to the USPS may have to be a real solution.  To address the real problems.  Which are simple.  There isn’t enough paper mail to support the current size of the USPS.  Or the current budget.  So you’re going to have to close some offices.  Some sorting centers.  And other infrastructure.  Most important of all you’re going to have to cut the payroll.  Letting people go.  And reducing their pay and benefit packages for those who stay.  Including those for retirees.  Like they do in the real world.  It’s either that or figuring out a way to put a stamp on an email.  Which past postmasters have thought about.  And are no doubt thinking about again.  If they can just figure a way to blame George W. Bush.  Or the Republicans.  Because young people already hate them. 

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The British Government takes over Royal Mail’s Underfunded Pension Fund for Short-Term Deficit Reduction

Posted by PITHOCRATES - March 18th, 2012

Week in Review

The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) is going broke.  Why?  Two reasons.  People email and text today.  Even pay their bills online.  So they’re not mailing letters.  And every piece of mail the people don’t mail is lost revenue for the USPS.  Which can be a problem in an organization that has a high overhead.  And an aging and retiring workforce.  Which brings us to the second reason.  Pensions.  Just like in Britain (see Government to take on Royal Mail pension to pay down debt by Matt Falloon posted 3/19/2012 on Reuters).

Chancellor George Osborne will use a 28 billion pound ($44.36 billion) asset transfer from taking on the Royal Mail’s pension fund to pay down government debt next year, a government source said on Sunday.

The transfer of the state-owned mail company’s pension scheme – subject to European Union approval and due to be announced in next week’s budget – will reduce the government’s budget deficit next year, while the liabilities from the scheme, worth 37.5 billion pounds, will show up on the government’s accounts across the next two decades as they are drawn on by scheme members…

In the long run, however, there will be an overall cost to the Treasury from the transfer because the scheme’s liabilities outweigh its assets.

The Royal Mail is no different than the USPS.  People are emailing, texting and paying their bills online in Britain, too.  Which means neither 20th century postal service can make it in the 21st century.  They both need to reinvent themselves.  And fast.  But the LAST thing either nation should do is to bail out their postal service.  Not when each nation is struggling under record deficits.  For this will only delay the day of reckoning.  And make it far more costly.  Allowing greater losses to accrue.  In the face of growing pension payouts.

Short-term fixes for long-term problems is very bad policy.  It’s what we call kicking the can down the road.  It doesn’t fix any problems.  It only makes them more difficult to fix.  Burying the country under ever growing deficits.  And placing incredible tax demands on taxpayers not even born yet.   So you know the Americans will follow suit.  And bail out the USPS.  Because of late they seem to have a penchant for making bad decisions.

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The Current Volume of Mail only Warrants a Postal Service that is in Large Part Part-Time

Posted by PITHOCRATES - December 11th, 2011

Week in Review

Looks like the digital age is not causing problem just for the United States Postal Service (see Two thousand post offices to close and re-open with substandard service by Christopher Hope posted 12/11/2011 on The Telegraph).

Under plans that will be rolled out from June, one fifth of the branch network will be converted into new “PO Locals”, which offer a downgraded service within other commercial premises.

Customers will not be able to apply for driving licences, send post bulky mail overseas, pay car tax or make cash withdrawals using passbooks.

The changes will affect one in five of the 11,500 post offices across the country.

The profit in mail was in the mail.  But if people are talking, texting and emailing more than they are mailing, that’s a huge hit in the revenue stream.  And a cause for change.

Andy Burrowes, a postal expert at Consumer Focus, told The Daily Telegraph: “These are subtle but quite fundamental changes for customers concerned.”

He said the trials had found that often postal services were treated as a “secondary offer” by the shop or garage owner in PO Locals.

Instead of a dedicated counter for postal transactions longstanding post office customers would be expected to queue up behind other people buying milk and crisps in order to receive their weekly pensions…

Michelle Mitchell, Charity Director of Age UK, said: “Post offices are a real lifeline for many older people who use them as a ‘one-stop’ shop to access their pension, benefits, pay their bills, get advice and even in some cases socialise with others.

Ever see Green Acres?  An American sitcom from that aired from 1965 to 1971?  Sam Drucker ran the general store in Hooterville.  If you needed to buy anything you went to Sam.  And you went to Sam if you needed to mail a letter.  Because Sam was also the postmaster for Hooterville.  The little post office inside the general store was a secondary offering.  And it was like that through much of Rural America.

So the PO Locals is not a new concept.  And it may be the best way to fix the problem with ailing postal services everywhere.  Make them a secondary offering with part-time postmasters.  Because the current volume of mail only warrants a postal service that is in large part part-time.

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