The 2010 Census Confirms the Consensus that Liberalism has Failed

Posted by PITHOCRATES - December 19th, 2010

America is a Center-Right Country

The people voted against liberalism in the 2010 Midterm elections.  And they’ve been voting against it since 2000.  With their residency.  They’ve been moving out of the blue states.  And into the red (see New population count may complicate Obama 2012 bid by Charles Babington, Associated Press, posted 12/19/2010 on My Way).

The population continues to shift from Democratic-leaning Rust Belt states to Republican-leaning Sun Belt states, a trend the Census Bureau will detail in its once-a-decade report to the president. Political clout shifts, too, because the nation must reapportion the 435 House districts to make them roughly equal in population, based on the latest census figures.

People are moving out of the big welfare states.  They have rejected tax and spend.  They have rejected Big Government.  And they have rejected Big Union.  At least based on the states where they’re moving to. 

The biggest gainer will be Texas, a GOP-dominated state expected to gain up to four new House seats, for a total of 36. The chief losers – New York and Ohio, each projected by nongovernment analysts to lose two seats – were carried by Obama in 2008 and are typical of states in the Northeast and Midwest that are declining in political influence.

Out of the blue.  And into the red.  As one would expect in a center-right country.

Running away from Liberalism

So the people are literally running away from liberalism.  Why?  Because blue states are expensive to live in.  Especially on a pension (see The 10 Worst States for Retirees by Robert Powell, MarketWatch, posted 12/19/2010 on Yahoo! Finance).

Plenty of folks are aware of the best states for retirees. But what are the 10 worst states in which to spend your golden years?

Among them are states with the biggest financial problems.

Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, Oregon, Rhode Island and Wisconsin joined California as the 10 most troubled states, according to Pew’s analysis.

Of note, TopRetirements.com’s Brady suggested that retirees and would-be retirees might want to avoid states in fiscal peril because these locales might be expected to face decreasing services and increasing taxation.

And winning an honorable mention is New York.

New York wasn’t mentioned as being in fiscal trouble by the Pew Center, but it does have “very high taxes, including property taxes.” In fact, Brady said New York has the second-highest tax burden and fifth-highest per capita property taxes. Plus, he said, the Empire State has a “dysfunctional state legislature.” As if that wasn’t bad enough, it’s terrifically expensive to live in New York.

Surprisingly, people don’t want to pay high taxes.  No matter how generous the government is to other people with their money.  And big governmental payrolls and pensions are growing to be a bigger and bigger problem.

As for Rhode Island, Brady said it’s probably the worst-off state in the Northeast from a financial viewpoint. It also has high taxes, though he noted that the state does boast some great places to live.

New Jersey, according to Brady’s analysis, has the highest property taxes in the U.S., as well as the highest total tax burden of any state, as reported in a 2008 Tax Foundation report. Plus, New Jersey has serious pension-funding issues, Brady noted. States with the greatest tax burdens after New Jersey were New York, Connecticut, Maryland, Hawaii, California, Ohio, Vermont, Wisconsin and Rhode Island, joined by the District of Columbia.

America is a center-right country with smatterings of blue on the West Coast, the Midwest and New England.

New England had two other states on Brady’s list of worst places for retirees: Massachusetts, which has high taxes including high property taxes and a very high cost of living, and Connecticut, which has the third-highest tax burden of any state as well as high property taxes.

Nevada reelected Harry Reid.  Even though his state is in the toilet. 

Ironically, the 10th-worst place to retire is the one state where it’s easy to find a cheap place to live: Nevada. As many know, Nevada is presently the home-foreclosure capital of the world. In fact, the Silver State continues to lead the nation in terms of foreclosure filings per household, with one filing for every 79 homes, according to RealtyTrac. Yes, the state is having financial problems, but the good news for retirees living there or contemplating a move there is that it doesn’t have an income tax — at least not yet.

No income tax…yet.  When you have out of control spending to fund large government payrolls and pensions, you will run out of money.  And when they do, governments don’t cut spending.  They raise taxes.  So get ready for it Nevada.  Income taxes are coming.

Federalism Kept Big Government Small.  For Awhile.

I don’t know how many more ways we can say it.  We don’t like paying high taxes.  And we don’t like paying high taxes to help other people live better lives than we do.  We’ve said it at the mid-term elections.  And we’ve been saying it since the 2000 census.

This was the genius behind federalism.  It kept Big Government small.  If a state taxed and spent and regulated our lives too much, we could move to another state.  But with the growth of the federal government, we soon won’t have that option anymore.  For when the federal government oversteps its bounds and taxes and spends to support ever larger government payrolls and pensions, and they control our pensions (Social Security) and our health care (Obamacare), where are we going to move to in protest?  China?

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