The Obama Administration’s Dollar Devaluation lowers the Cost of Living in Britain

Posted by PITHOCRATES - October 6th, 2013

Week in Review

The British economy appears to be turning the corner.  Of course, they have an advantage over the American economy.  They’re not stuck buying petrol with a devalued American dollar (see UK economy growing at fastest rate in the developed world by Philip Aldrick, and Steve Hawkes posted 10/3/2013 on The Telegraph).

And there were hopes tonight that the signs of life could help tackle the cost of living, with a strong pound helping to push down the cost of petrol, which is traded globally in US dollars.

There are two primary forces that determine the price of gasoline.  Supply and demand.  And the strength of the US dollar.

Thanks to the worst economic recovery since that following the Great Depression, gasoline is not in as great of demand as it once was.  Before President Obama became president.  With so many people having left the labor force people just don’t have the money to put into their gas tanks.  Hence the ‘staycation’.  Spending the family vacation at home.  Doing fun things in the backyard.  Like cutting the grass.  And then when the kids’ chores are done there’s hotdogs on the grill.  Can a week at Disneyland compare to that?

Even though we’re buying less gas gasoline prices are still pretty high.  Why?  Because unlike the British we buy our gasoline with devalued dollars.  Due to all of that quantitative easing.  Printing money to buy treasury bonds.  To stimulate the economy.  Where only the rich Wall Street traders who buy and sell these bonds are getting stimulated.

With more money in circulation chasing the same goods and services in the economy it takes more dollars to buy what they once did.  Including gasoline.  Especially gasoline.  For the higher price of gas can be hidden in other products by reducing the package size of the product sold.  Such as smaller cereal boxes.  The prices may not be going up on cereal but we have to buy cereal more often.  Spending more money in the long run.  The higher price of gasoline (due to a weaker dollar) makes everything more expensive in the supply chain that ultimately puts those boxes of cereal on the supermarket shelf.  Ditto for everything else that is moved with gasoline or diesel.  But they can’t shrink the package size of gasoline to hide the added cost from the devalued dollar.  Because they sell gasoline by a fixed measurement.  We buy it by the gallon.  We don’t buy it by the box.  If we sold cereal by a fixed measurement we’d see cereal prices rising a lot higher than they are now.  But they’re not. So the boxes are getting smaller.

The British pound is stronger than the US dollar.  So when the British buy oil on the world market they exchange stronger pounds for weaker dollars.  Getting more dollars in exchange for their pounds.  Removing the U.S. price inflation (due to the devalued dollar) from the price of oil.  Lowering the cost of oil in Britain.  And lowering costs throughout the British supply chain.  Which will help lower the British cost of living.  Making life easier for the British consumer.  Because the British are more responsible with their currency than the Obama administration is with the American currency.


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