Greece is cutting their Goods and Service Tax (GST) to replace the Lost Economic Activity the High GST Caused

Posted by PITHOCRATES - August 3rd, 2013

Week in Review

There are few things more enjoyable than going out to a nice restaurant.  Where you and your significant other can enjoy a fine meal.  And some adult beverages.  A couple of cocktails each before dinner.  A couple of glasses of wine each with dinner.  Then dessert and coffee after dinner.  It doesn’t get better than this.  But it can get costly.  Especially when there is a 23% GST (see Greece slashes restaurant taxes by Alanna Petroff posted 8/2/2013 on CNNMoney).

This week, the Greek government slashed the restaurant sales tax on food and drink across the country, making it cheaper for everyone to go out and grab a meal.

The restaurant sales tax, which was 23%, has been cut down to 13%…

It’s expected that the break will cost the government €100 million in lost tax revenue in the short term, but will ultimately benefit the country in the long run as it boosts tourism spending and encourages restaurant owners to declare more of their revenue to the government.

They acknowledge that a high GST tax (goods and service tax) rate discourages people from going out.  But the notion that cutting a tax rate will cost the government is a foolish Keynesian notion that must be done away with.  For example, let’s look at the numbers for the above noted dinner out.  If each entree is €8, each cocktail/glass of wine is €5, each dessert is €5 and each coffee is €2 the total for a dinner out is €70.  Add in the 23% GST (€16.10) brings the total up to €86.10.  That’s a lot of money.  So let’s say we can only do this twice a week.

The best part of going out is relaxing over adult beverages.  Which is often the largest part of the bill.  In our example, we drink a total of 16 adult beverages in those two dinner outs (and walk home/back to the hotel or take a taxi as we shouldn’t drive anywhere after enjoying 4 adult beverages during a meal).  Our total GST comes to €32.20.  Equivalent to the cost of 6.4 adult beverages.  In other words, the GST makes us pay for 6.4 adult beverages that we’re not allowed to drink.  So our 2 nights out we pay for 22.4 adult beverages but can only drink 16 of them.  If we went out 4 nights a week we’d pay for 44.9 adult beverages but could only drink 32 of them.  Or drink about 71.3% of what we paid for.  Which would limit our evenings out.  Now let’s look at what happens when the GST is only 13%.

The GST for our 2 nights out only costs us 3.6 adult beverages.  Not 6.4.  Which isn’t too bad.  So we are more willing to eat out.  If we go out 4 nights a week that GST now only costs us 7.3 adult beverages.  In other words, we pay for 39.3 adult beverages while getting to drink 32 of them.  Or about 82%.  Which would encourage us to go out more than before.

So with the high GST rate we may go out only twice a week and pay €32.2 in GST taxes.  But at the lower GST rate we may go out 4 times a week and pay €36.40 in GST taxes.  A 4.2% increase.  And because the lower tax rate is getting people to go out the restaurant owner doesn’t have to cheat the government out of the tax to get people into the restaurant.  If the tax rate is reasonable people will pay it and the owner will pass it on to the government.

This is something Keynesians don’t understand.  They see only loss tax revenue with a cut in tax rates.  Not the additional economic activity those lower tax rates will generate.  Which is why Keynesians have horrible economic records.  Like President Obama.  And the Eurozone nations.  While people who understand classical economics have good economic records.  Like Ronald Reagan.  And Margaret Thatcher.

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