Double Entry Bookkeeping, Trial Balance, Financial Statements, Financial Ratios, Italian City-States and Capitalism

Posted by PITHOCRATES - January 8th, 2013

History 101

The Government Finances are a Train Wreck because they have the Power to Tax and to Print Money

President Obama averaged a deficit of $1.3 trillion for each of his first 4 years in office.  Bringing the national debt up to $16.4 trillion at the end of 2012.  And there will be another drop-down, drag-out fight to raise the debt limit in a couple of months.  Why does the government spend this kind of money?  Because they can.  And because they can they can buy a lot of votes by giving stuff away.  Stuff paid for with all of that spending.

When the government implemented Social Security and Medicare there was still an expanding birthrate.  More people were entering the workforce than were leaving it.  Providing an ever expanding tax base.  And a rising level of tax revenue.  Without ever having to increase tax rates.  And the smart government planners thought the good times would just keep rolling.  But they didn’t.  Thanks to birth control and abortion.  Which reversed the equation.  The population growth rate slowed down.  Fewer people entered the workforce than left it.  Resulting in a declining tax base.  And falling tax revenue.  Pushing Social Security and Medicare to the brink of bankruptcy.

The government finances are a train wreck.  And they keep digging their hole deeper.  Because they can.  For they have the power to tax.  And to print money.  Something private businesses can’t do.  Which is why few corporations’ finances are train wrecks.  Except those with unionized workforces with defined-benefit pension plans.  Something long discontinued by most in the private sector.  As it’s a failed economic model.  Just like Social Security.  And Medicare.  Over time more people move from being contributors to being beneficiaries.  Pushing defined-benefit pension plans, too, to the brink of bankruptcy.

At the End of each Accounting Period they run a Trial Balance to Verify the Total of Debits Equals the Total of Credits

The difference between private sector businesses and the federal government is that private sector businesses have to be responsible while the federal government does not.  The federal government focuses on what’s politically expedient.  While private sector businesses must focus on the bottom line.  Spending only the money they have.  Because they can’t tax or print money to fix their messes.  Like the government can.  And does.  A lot.  So they have to avoid making messes in the first place.  They can’t kick the can down the road.  Because in the private sector there is accountability.  And that accountability begins with getting their hands around their business numbers.  So they can understand what their businesses are doing.  And when it’s time to take appropriate actions.  To prevent a financial train wreck.  And it all begins with double-entry bookkeeping.

Double-entry bookkeeping includes debits and credits.  Each transaction is posted to the accounting records with at least one debit and at least one credit.  The dollar amount of debits equals the dollar amounts of credits.  If they don’t equal after recording a transaction they were posted incorrectly.  For example, when someone pays cash for something at a retail store there are two debits and two credits to post.  First we debit cash $20 and credit sales revenue $20.  Then we debit cost of goods sold $18 (the cost of the item sold) and credit inventory $18 (the cost of the item in inventory).   If posted correctly the total debits equal $38.  And the total credits equal $38.  If, for example, someone debited sales revenue instead of crediting sales revenue the total debits would equal $58 while the total credits would equal $18.  Because they don’t balance we know something was posted incorrectly.  And can go back, find the error and correct it.

A business accounts for every penny that flows through their business.  Each accounting period will have thousands of such entries.  And at the end of each accounting period they will run a trial balance to verify that the total of debits equals the total of credits.  When they do they can be pretty sure that the financial information they recorded fairly represent the financial activity of the business at the end of that accounting period.  Then they prepare the financial statements (the income statement, the balance sheet, the statement of cash flows and the statement of retained earnings and stockholders’ equity).  Businesses study these statements to assess the health of their businesses.  They calculate financial ratios to assess the liquidity, long-term debt-paying ability and profitability of the business.  As well as calculate ratios for investor analysis.  To make sure they are satisfying the owners of the company.  The stockholders.

The First Use of Double-Entry Bookkeeping dates back to the Italian City-States of Florence, Genoa and Venice

This is a lot of valuable information.  Courtesy of that double-entry bookkeeping.  Something that can be so mundane and mind-numbing at the data entry point.  Especially if you’re trying to figure out why your trial balance doesn’t balance.  But when it does balance.  And the financial information is fairly represented.  Business owners and managers can make informed decisions to avoid doing what our federal government does.  Including making the hard decisions that permit these businesses stay in business for a decade or more.  Even a century or more.  Thanks to merchant banking.  And the Italian city-states.

For those of you who hate bookkeeping blame the Italians.  Some of the Florentines were using it as early as the 13th century.  The Genoese were using it shortly thereafter.  Soon Florence, Genoa and Venice were using double-entry bookkeeping.  This mastering of economic data made these city-states the dominant economic powers of the Mediterranean.  Making them masters of trade.  And merchant banking.  To manage that trade.  This system of accounting even made it into textbooks in the late 1400s.  Helping to spread good business practices.  Where they were picked up by other great traders.  The Europeans.

With double-entry bookkeeping businesses were able to grow.  First with the help of government.  Mercantilism.  Then without.  Free market capitalism.  Which created the British Empire.  And gave us the Industrial Revolution.  Then the United States came into their own in the late 19th century.  And surpassed the British Empire.  Economic activity exploded in the United States.  Because they were able to get their hands around all of those financial numbers.  And thanks to free market capitalism they focused on the bottom line.  And made the necessary decisions.  No matter how painful they were.  Something that the federal government just can’t do.  Because those decisions aren’t politically expedient.

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