Without a Bill Clinton the Bursting of the Canadian Housing Bubble will be less Painful than in the US

Posted by PITHOCRATES - November 10th, 2012

Week in Review

The subprime mortgage crisis caused the Great Recession.  And bad government policy caused the subprime mortgage policy.  First with artificially low interest rates to encourage everyone to borrow money and take on enormous amounts of debt.  Then the Clinton administration took it up a notch.  By charging lenders with discrimination in their lending practices.  And if they didn’t find a away to qualify the unqualified for mortgages they would soon find themselves out of the mortgage business.  So they came up with subprime lending.  Adjustable rate mortgages (ARM).  No documentation mortgages.  Anything to get the government off of their backs.  And the government was so pleased with what they saw they started to buy (and/or guarantee) those toxic mortgages with their Government Sponsored Enterprises Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.  Clearing those toxic mortgages from the lenders balance sheet by unloading them onto unsuspecting investors.  Clearing the way for even more toxic subprime lending.  The government was pleased.  And the bankers were making money with bad lending practices.  Something they normally would have avoided because it is very risky.  But when the government was transferring that risk to the taxpayer what did they have to lose?

Governments like a hot real estate market.  Because housing sales drives so much economic activity.  Because people put a lot of stuff into those houses.  Which is why governments are always quick to use their monetary authority to lower interest rates.  Which is what they did in the US.  Cheap money to borrow.  Lax lending practices thanks to the Clinton administration.  Creating a housing boom.  And a housing bubble.  It was a perfect storm brewing.  The only thing that it needed was a raise in the interest rates.  Which came.  Causing the subprime mortgage crisis as those ARMS reset at higher interest rates.  Leading to a wave of subprime mortgage defaults.  And the Great Recession.  Which raced around the world thanks to those toxic mortgages Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac unloaded on unsuspecting investors.

Canada did not suffer as much from the Great Recession.  Because they did not pressure their lenders to qualify the unqualified like Bill Clinton did in the US.  But they still used their monetary authority to keep interest rates artificially low.  So while they escaped the great damage the Americans suffered in their subprime mortgage they still have a housing bubble.  And it looks like it may be time for it to burst (see Analysis: Canada braces as housing slowdown takes hold by Andrea Hopkins posted 11/10/2012 on Reuters).

Long convinced the country’s housing boom would never end in a crash, Canadians have watched this autumn as a sharp slowdown in real estate spreads across the country, leaving would-be home buyers hopeful and sellers scared…

Signs are everywhere that Canada’s long run-up in house prices is over, hit by a combination of tighter mortgage lending rules and growing consumer reluctance to take on more debt. Sales of existing homes are down steeply, with condo sales hit especially hard, and some long-booming prices have started to fall…

Canadian households hold more debt than American families did before the U.S. housing bubble burst, which has led the government to tighten mortgage lending rules four times in four years…

Tal believes slower sales activity will be followed by falling prices in many cities. But he says Canadian lending standards have been higher, and borrowers more cautious, than in the United States before its crash, which will prevent large-scale mortgage defaults and plunging prices.

Mindful of what happened in the United States, the Canadian government has tightened mortgage rules to prevent home buyers from taking on too much debt. While interest rates are low and expected to stay low into 2013, the fear is that eventual rate hikes will drive borrowers out of their homes or into bankruptcy…

The last round of mortgage rule changes took effect in July, forcing home buyers to cut back on their budget and pushing many prospective first-time buyers out of the market entirely.

The Canadians may escape the damage the US suffered as Bill Clinton was an American and not a Canadian.  So they only have to suffer the effects of bad monetary policy.  Not the effects of government enforced bad lending practices.  So housing prices will fall in Canada.  And there will probably be a recession to correct those inflated real estate prices.  But housing prices probably will not fall as far as they did in the US.  For the Canadians were more responsible with their irresponsible monetary policy than the Americans were.

The lesson here is that when markets determine interest rates housing bubbles are smaller and recessions are less painful.  If you don’t believe that just ask an American with an underwater mortgage.

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