France is Raising Taxes on Wealthy Individuals and Businesses to Stimulate Economic Activity

Posted by PITHOCRATES - September 30th, 2012

Week in Review

When a store wants to increase sales what do they do?  Raise prices?  Or lower prices?  Well, based on those sales papers, one has to say they lower prices to increase sales.  Because if someone stops buying from a store raising prices just isn’t going to bring them back to that store.  For how many people ever say they would shop more at a store if only they would raise their prices?  Zero people.  For no one ever shops where their money will buy less.

The higher the price of something the less we buy.  Something few people will dispute.  Unless, of course, it’s rich people investing in job-creating businesses.  As government people believe that rich investors will spend more money the less they can make from their investments.  Especially in France (see Hollande opts to punish French rich with €20bn of new taxes by John Lichfield posted 9/29/2012 on The Independent).

France’s Socialist government insisted yesterday that it could solve the conundrum of simultaneous deficit-cutting and growth which has eluded every other European country from Greece to Britain.

As new clouds gathered over the eurozone, President François Hollande pushed ahead with the country’s toughest budget for three decades, taking €20bn (£16bn) of new taxes from big businesses and the wealthy but imposing relatively moderate €10bn cuts on state spending.

With growth stagnant and unemployment rising sharply, the success or failure of the 2013 budget could decide whether Europe’s second-largest economy becomes part of solution to the eurozone crisis or a new, and devastating, part of the problem.

If we can learn anything from history it’s this.  Tax cuts stimulate economic activity.  Tax hikes don’t.  So growth will remain stagnant in France.  And unemployment will rise even further.  Especially when they will tax very successful business people at 75% on earnings and eliminate business tax breaks.

Among other things, the budget introduces Mr Hollande’s “temporary” 75 per cent tax on personal earnings over €1m and abolishes the tax breaks on large firms introduced by his predecessor, Nicolas Sarkozy.

The Prime Minister, Jean-Marc Ayrault, spoke of a “fighting budget” which would help to get France “back on track” after 38 years of successive state deficits. He insisted the target of 0.8 per cent growth next year was realistic and would be achieved.

But opposition politicians said the budget had been “muddled together”, and was more concerned with preserving Mr Hollande’s campaign promises than addressing France’s – and Europe’s – deepening economic crisis. They pointed out that, while almost all European countries were cutting back spending, the French budget for 2013 preserved the 56 per cent of GDP spent by the state and marginally increased the number of state employees, by 6,000…

Critics complained, however, that the budget did nothing to tackle the erosion of France’s international competitiveness, which has been blamed for large-scale redundancies in the car industry and other sectors. The cost of employing a worker in France has increase by 28 per cent in the past decade, compared with an 8 per cent increase in Germany.

A growth rate of 0.8%?  They’ll be able to achieve what many call a recessionary level of growth?  Not much of a goal.  No wonder France has one of the most uncompetitive workforces.  That massive welfare state costs money.  And there’s only one way to get the money to pay for that massive welfare state.  Taxes.  Even if a government runs a deficit they finance with borrowing.  Because they have to pay the interest on that debt with taxes.

Everything comes back to jobs.  The more jobs there are the more tax revenue the government can collect.  But to create more jobs businesses have to grow larger.  But when governments tax businesses (and business investors) so excessively there is little incentive to grow these businesses larger.  So France’s actions are not likely to have any of the intended results.  In fact they will probably only make a bad situation worse.  And may make them part of the problem in the Eurozone crisis.

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