The European Central Bank taking Steps to make the Eurozone Crisis Worse

Posted by PITHOCRATES - September 22nd, 2012

Week in Review

To increase the money supply central banks can do a few different things.  To stimulate economic activity.  They can lower reserve requirements to stimulate money creation via fractional reserve banking.  They can print money.  And they can buy bonds with money they create that they inject into the economy with their bond purchases.  These actions will put more money into the economy.  In hopes people will use it to generate economic activity.  Of course there is a tradeoff.  Increasing the money supply can also create inflation.  And often does.  Unless the economy is so far into the toilet that no one spends any money even with all of this new money in the economy (see ECB in ‘panic’, say former chief economist Juergen Stark posted 9/22/2002 on The Telegraph).

“The break came in 2010. Until then everything went well,” Juergen Stark, the German who resigned from the ECB in late 2011 after criticising its earlier round of buying up of sovereign debt, told Austrian daily Die Presse in an interview.

“Then the ECB began to take on a new role, to fall into panic. It gave in to outside pressure … pressure from outside Europe.”

Mr Stark said the ECB’s new plan to buy up unlimited amounts of eurozone states’ bonds, announced on September 6, on the secondary market to bring down their borrowing rates was misguided.

“Together with other central banks, the ECB is flooding the market, posing the question not only about how the ECB will get its money back, but also how the excess liquidity created can be absorbed globally,” Mr Stark said.

“It can’t be solved by pressing a button. If the global economy stabilises, the potential for inflation has grown enormously.”

The European Central Bank (ECB) wasn’t trying to stimulate economic activity with these bond purchases.  What they were trying to do was throw a lifeline to those nations in the Eurozone about to go belly up because no one will buy their bonds.  Because the chances of them ever repaying their enormous debts are slim to none.  Because of this these indebted countries have to offer very high interest rates to entice anyone to take a chance buying their risky bonds.  These high interest rates, though, were hurting these countries.  Increasing their financial woes.  And pushing them ever closer to bankruptcy.  So the ECB caved.  And bought their worthless bonds.  By doing something only a central bank can do.  Create money out of thin air.

These additional Euros thrown into the money supply could very well end up depreciating the Euro.  And sparking off inflation.  Which monetary expansion ultimately does.  Unless an economy is so far into the toilet that no one will spend this additional money.  And it just sits in the bank.  But if the economy does turn around there will be a lot more money available to borrow.  At exceptionally low interest rates.  So low that some will borrow it because of those low interest rates.  Which could spark off inflation.  Helping the Eurozone to settle back into recession.

This is not going to help anyone in the Eurozone.  Especially those staring down bankruptcy.  Because this won’t cut spending.  This won’t reduce any deficits.  And this won’t lower any debt.  All of the old problems that caused their problems will still be there.  Along with a new problem.  Inflation.  Guaranteeing that things will get worse in the Eurozone before they get better.

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