Free Trade

Posted by PITHOCRATES - November 28th, 2011

Economics 101

When People can Buy and Sell as they Please without Outside Interference we call it Free Trade

Agriculture advances gave us food surpluses.  Food surpluses gave us a division of labor.  The division of labor gave us trade.  Money made that trade more efficient.  Religion and the Rule of Law allowed great gatherings of people to live and work together in urban settings.  Thus unleashing human capital.  And creating a great diversity in economic output.  Because all these people with spare time could create new things.  That other people discovered.  And wanted.

The Rule of Law gave us property rights.  And it’s because of property rights that people take chances.  Then.  And now.  To create things.  Invest their labor and capital.  Because they own what they create.  And are free to trade these products of their own labor and capital.  Freely.  With whom they want to.  At the value of exchange they agree to.  Encouraging others to do the same.  So they, too, can enjoy the products of their own labor and capital.

When people can buy and sell as they please without outside interference we call it free trade.  Outside interference can include many things.  But mostly it means government interfering with market forces.  Such as taxing things differently.  Placing tariffs or quotas on imported goods.  Subsidies to certain domestic manufacturers.  Etc.  All things that complicate the exchange of goods and services.  Because you have to consider all of these other things in addition to the goods and services you wish to exchange.  Complicating the economic exchange.  Making it more costly.  Less free.  And simply less of it.

The Overregulation of a Free Market Creates a Black Market

The less free and more complicated trade gets something happens.  The overregulation of a free market creates a secondary market.  A black market.  Where economic exchanges occur free from government interference.   The black market then becomes the free market alternative to the overregulated ‘government’ market.

The former Soviet Union is a good example.  Government bureaucrats completely controlled the market.  They set the prices.  And allocated the resources.  Poorly, I might add.  And the result?  Stores full of items no one wanted to buy.  Long lines at stores selling the basic necessities of life (such as soap and toilet paper).  Where people waited to buy their allotted quota because there was so little available to sell.  And a thriving black market where you could buy the latest in Western fashion and electronics.  Which proved very handy in bribing government bureaucrats.  Because even they wanted what the Westerners traded freely.

Another good example are cigarettes.  Stores across certain state lines do very well selling cigarettes.  For these stores can sell cigarettes at steep discounts compared to those on the other side of the border.  Why?  Cigarette taxes.  And some cities and states really pile them on.  Making some people spend more money on gas as well as risking trouble with the law to get these more affordable cigarettes.  Often buying them in bulk.  And then smuggling them back home.

An Overly Regulated Market alters our Economic Decision Making, Resulting in Less Economic Activity

A free market lets us come together freely to buy and sell what we choose.  An overly regulated market alters our economic decision making.  Due to higher prices.  And regulatory costs.  A minimal amount may not affect our purchasing decisions.  Whereas an excessive amount pushes some outside the law.  Into the black market.  Back to a free market.  Which is what we all want.  To freely buy and sell what we choose.

The net effect on the economy?  The less free the market is the less economic activity there is.  Either due to higher prices.  Or higher regulatory costs.  Both of which leave us with less to spend on other economic exchanges.  And less motivation to commit labor and capital to create new things to trade.

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